Solar charging a PIM e-Bike

JackA

Member
The built in 12 VDC to 44 VDC converter is the key to solar charging your PIM e-Bike. Why charge with 12 VDC? Well how about camping in remote areas, or while driving to the ride. The picture attached is a Goal Zero Yeti Lithium storage system connected to a Boulder 100 solar array. The day I took this picture the solar panel was producing enough power that the Lithium pack did not have to supply any while charging the PIM.
IMG_0857.JPG
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
How much does it cost to not plug into the grid? Seems like an expensive way to avoid sending the power company 50 cents for charging from the grid.
 

JackA

Member
How much does it cost to not plug into the grid? Seems like an expensive way to avoid sending the power company 50 cents for charging from the grid.
Hey, excellent point! The intended use is to charge the PIM e-Bikes while camping far away from the electrical grid. In the past we got one ride; with this solar system we can recharge both e-Bikes every day. We also use the system as a power back up for our home in north central Washington to keep the refrigerator and gas fire place operational during power outages. So, the charging of the e-Bikes is really just a side benefit.
 

jazz

Well-Known Member
What is the rate of charge and how long does it take to charge up the battery?
 

JackA

Member
What is the rate of charge and how long does it take to charge up the battery?
I was plugged into the 12 VDC outlet which is rated at up to 10 Amps. This would mean the maximum output would be 120 Watts. The 380 Wh battery would, if the starting point was fully discharged, take 380/120=3.2 hours. Lithium achieves its best charge cycle life when kept at a SOC (State of Charge) between 20% and 90% so we try not to discharge our packs below 20%. One improvement to the PIM pack I would appreciate is SOC shown in percentage rather than "Bars". This would make it easier to see the 20% boundary while riding.