Solar MPPT Portable Power Generator (UPS) frustration

webcurl

Active Member
Hi all.
Trying to simplify my Bosch solar charging scenario with the 4A Bosch charger (needs constant 200W Pure Sine AC).
So far i've looked at these UPS's:

and what seems so far to be ideal except only 18V solar input:

I'd like to use my 2 lightweight panels that can put out up to 220W but voltage may be up to 40VDC.
Problem is, all of these either don't have a Solar MPPT that can handle up to 200W or are limited with input voltage or are just plain heavy (i'd like one with just 200Wh capacity), or they do not allow pass-thru charging.

Has anyone found anything decent?
 

PDXzap

Active Member
This is just a suggestion for a possibly different approach, it might not be at all what you want to do but Grin Technologies posted this under the comments from this youtube video.
"
Grin Technologies1 year ago
"You should be able to charge the bosch battery from a solar panel if you use an MPPT charge controller that is set to no more than 4A, you hack the connector off of your existing charger in order to obtain the proprietary plug, and you wire up a 5V regulator so that the output of the MPPT generates a 5V signal which goes to the 3rd pin on the charger plug and in turn 'opens up' the charging port of the battery pack. Without this 5V present on the 3rd pin of the plug you won't be able to put in any charge current. And from our experience using a Satiator to charge a Bosch ebike pack, as soon as you hit 4.5amps, the charge port will shut off as well."
 

webcurl

Active Member
This is just a suggestion for a possibly different approach, it might not be at all what you want to do but Grin Technologies posted this under the comments from this youtube video.
"
Grin Technologies1 year ago
"You should be able to charge the bosch battery from a solar panel if you use an MPPT charge controller that is set to no more than 4A, you hack the connector off of your existing charger in order to obtain the proprietary plug, and you wire up a 5V regulator so that the output of the MPPT generates a 5V signal which goes to the 3rd pin on the charger plug and in turn 'opens up' the charging port of the battery pack. Without this 5V present on the 3rd pin of the plug you won't be able to put in any charge current. And from our experience using a Satiator to charge a Bosch ebike pack, as soon as you hit 4.5amps, the charge port will shut off as well."
Thankyou, i've seen this and i will go down that track when my warranties finish. However, they may have only tested that with the older 300 & 400Wh Bosch batteries, which may have a slightly different handshaking protocol between charger & battery (eg. None, just 5V).
It's extremely difficult to get any clear information on all this Bosch charging stuff, seems at times i'm the only one interested.
 

PDXzap

Active Member
However, they may have only tested that with the older 300 & 400Wh Bosch batteries, which may have a slightly different handshaking protocol between charger & battery (eg. None, just 5V).
I see.

You've probably already thought about this but you could always piece together your own power pack with a solar charge controller for lithium. I've never tried any of them but there are a few out there designed for lithium. I actually have one but I've only used it on the "flooded" setting.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Everything you are looking at is way too small. Start with a Goal Zero Yeti 1000, to be able to handle that size Bosch charger and amp rating, and add on their MPPT optimization module. And for the amount of time it will take to charge enough watt hours for the Bosch battery packs you probably would want 4 , 100 watt panels to make the system halfway practical. The panels you have to remember, are charging at relatively low voltages. Maybe 16 to 17 volts at peak, and lower on average throughout the day. I built my own solar charge station a few years ago, using a 100 amphour lead acid battery. Speaking from practical experience.