Stromer and the front wheel fork.

bluecat

Well-Known Member


In 2009 the first Stromer was ready for the swiss roads. Rigid aluminium fork, narrow 26" tires and on behalf of the 360Wh battery 5 Bar pressure (to reduce the rolling resistance and improve the range). No doubt, riding at Stromer speed was shake, rattle and roll. On non-paved forest trails or on snow covered roads with frozen lane grooves was it impossible to exceed ridiculous speed.

The solution: FOX F100 / 32 RL at that time the best suspension fork for fast road bikes. The FOX changed everything, especially the geometry of the bike. Seating position raised, handlebar raised even more - and steering angle becomes more flat. With other words: The Stromer lost some agility.

The real different thing was the adjustment of the suspension. It should relieve my wrist - but not dive too much on regular braking. The rebound was left untouched.

The company was aware of this dilemma. The answer was the ST1 with flexible carbon fork and larger tires. The still weak motor (lack of torque) let the people raise the air pressure. This hindered the comfort somewhat.

In 2014, the ST2 appears. A milestone for the e-bike industry. With the same suspension concept as the ST1 but with stronger motor. Rolling resistance is no more topic. The riding comfort is similar to the Stromer with the FOX fork.

More difficult the situation with the ST2s. Tires little bit more narrow, air pressure high due to the sporty riding style. once again, this hindered the comfort somewhat.

Then the ST1x. With same tires as ST1 / ST2, but with rigid aluminium fork. This saves some money, as the ST1x is the new entrance model. I didn't ride engouht long long with it, but I would understand everybody who complaint about lack of comfort.

Soon, the ST5 will come. A completely different Stromer. Larger wheels, much bigger tires and rigid aluminium fork. Riding pressure allowed down to 1.9 Bar. All components together give a new suspension concept without reducing steering precision. Personally, I strongly recommend a long test ride to build your own opinion!
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
I would need to ride one of each , w/suspension and w/o to make sure. Thinking I am ok when 1st testing i know I can fool myself and think it is Ok until I try it w/suspension. The question is NOT is the ride great , ok , or crappy , it is would it be better w/suspension at all? For my tender old behind I am willing to bet the cost of the bike I will like it better w/suspension.
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
Even when your suspension fork is set properly by the best experts, the will still be a safety risk on emergency braking.

The point is: You can't test or simulate an emergency braking situation. But when the situation happens, you will pull the brake levers by reflex with full force - just to avoid collision. As an effect, the handlebar dives down. The saddle becomes much higher than the handle bar. You will be kicked out of the saddle. What next?

The following fotostory will illustrate such situation:

Riding on the bike lane. Reduced speed due to the heavy traffic. You pass the still standing red car.




Suddenly, the red car turns to the right. You're surprised - and do the same, beginning to brake.




The car comes closer, collision seems unavoidable. The last hope: Pull the brakes with full force.




Finally, you're stopped. But the rear wheel is high in the air, you're no longer on the bike. The dashcam sees the ground...




In my case, I luckily managed to get my feet on the ground.

Now, you're in the dilemma: Soft suspension fork or safe riding? OK, you can set the saddle dom to the frame, riding like on a chopper with the handlebar high in the air and with slow speed. But is this what you bought a Stromer for?
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
For my tender old behind I am willing to bet the cost of the bike I will like it better w/suspension.
The myStromer AG is a very innovative, but small company. They are willing to satisfy their customers. The engineers know, some riders prefer suspension forks under all circumstances. The major problem is, the suspension forks on the market are built either for MTB or for slow road bikes. As shown above, event the best equipment can bring you in trouble.

That's why they started (with an industry partner) the development of an high speed e-bike suspension fork. This fork will have less travel range, smaller air compartment and a much more progressive characteristic. The goal is to maintain steering precision, suspension effect and riders savety.

I expect, the price will be in line with the ST5...

@opimax Additionally to the suspension fork, I would recommend the BodyFloat. With the steel spring and the different construction the ideal seat post suspension (and superior to its rubber competitors)
 
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opimax

Well-Known Member
We have 2 rubber Thud buster (LT) and one worn out Bodyfloat. None ever set correctly though. The Thud buster rides better when not properly set up compared to the BF not properly set up. The Thudbusters can and have been rebuilt, the BF is worn out and should be replaced. There is slop vertically and horizontally.

For me it is not just the big pot hole , more plain old comfort, especially on extended all day rides.

On my 1st week long ride 20+ years ago I met coupe who explained comfort while sitting on a bike. There are a million things to make a bike comfortable none of them work ! Some may improve it a little :)....I could not sit on my 5th and final day of 250+ miles.

Thx for the update.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
...and one worn out Bodyfloat. None ever set correctly though...the BF is worn out and should be replaced. There is slop vertically and horizontally....
Do you know how many miles you got out of the BF before you deemed it worn out? Just wondering how many I might expect out of mine (oldest has 2,200 miles and I am 165 pounds using black springs).
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
Do you know how many miles you got out of the BF before you deemed it worn out? Just wondering how many I might expect out of mine (oldest has 2,200 miles and I am 165 pounds using black springs).
@opimax and @Over50 ,
You may just need to replace the springs. If the post itself is worn out then it's a different issue.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
There is much free play on my unit, the side to side motion looks like wear on the bearings they would need repacking. My shaft did bend but since I am no longer using on the st1 and leaving in my bike full time the bend doesn’t effect anything.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
I love that Stromer is pushing the industry away from MTB suspensions. After replacing the low end suspension on my Juiced CCS with a rigid fork, I love the nimbleness of the front end, especially with the fast balloon tire I just installed, the Schwalbe g one speed.

That said, I haven't tried an ebike specific suspension.
 

fxr3

Active Member
I love that Stromer is pushing the industry away from MTB suspensions. After replacing the low end suspension on my Juiced CCS with a rigid fork, I love the nimbleness of the front end, especially with the fast balloon tire I just installed, the Schwalbe g one speed.

That said, I haven't tried an ebike specific suspension.
I don’t know about pushing the industry..... ........
They are selling a proprietary fork for ST2s- that has a short taper to it, so rock shox will not fit in head tube.
 

bluecat

Well-Known Member
A straw man is a common form of argument and is an informal fallacy based on giving the impression of refuting an opponent's argument, while actually refuting an argument that was never presented. One who engages in this fallacy is said to be "attacking a straw man.“
This must be a saying or a phrase or somewhat. Sorry, I'm not familiar with - and im not sure about my translation.

I raised this topic as I'm aware it's hot debate. All my observations are made from the point of a fast and sport rider. This means speed range 40 to 45 km/h, saddle slightly higher than the handlebar. The conclusion in terms of ST1 and ST2 is, that with or without a suspension fork, the riding comfort is similar but the geometry of the bike is changed.

But I'm also aware, other peoples riding style might much different from mine. This might lead to other outcome.

The ST5 is much different in wheel size, geometry and suspension capabilities. I strongly recommend a test ride on your commuter parcours (and please publish the outcome :)

 

bluecat

Well-Known Member


In Switzerland, it's mandatory to indicate with your arm if you will do a turn (to the left). See also the government advertising on left part of the picture.

This maneuver can be challenging, if you're at Stromer speed. Not only road bumps are disturbing, the rear view mirror does also (if he is not properly mounted below the handlebar.) On the ST5, I felt alway save, even if there was only one hand for steering.
 

vigilante

New Member
Hi, does anydbody know if it is possible to mount this rigid Stromer fork into a regular, non-electro bike? the lower cone of the shaft, is it suitable to fit a regular 1/18 bearing onto it? Thanks!
 
I also put a Fox suspension fork on my ST1 when I converted my bike to a fire road warrior. It really made a big difference in handling and comfort.

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