Suspension Seat Posts

AHicks

Well-Known Member
New Thudbuster owner here, pretty impressed with just one short ride on it. I was checking out seat posts on Amazon. My butt doesn't hurt bad enough to justify what they get for a Kinekt, but when I saw a "used" Thudbuster in the size I needed (Rad 27.2) available for 87 dollars, I jumped on it. Amazon used I've learned recently, is mostly stuff that's been returned for one reason or another and is generally in new condition. So I rolled the dice and won. It arrived in perfect "unused" condition and even had a couple of extra #9 cushions that came with it in addition to the 2 lighter ones that are supposed to come with it. I'm 300lbs, so I put a #7 and a #9 together and gave that a try (1 step down from the firmest available). So far, kinda glad I didn't pair up the ultra stiff #9's as their documentation suggested. First impression is it's going to do what I wanted, which isn't really looking for a lot of travel to try and soak up jumps off curbs and dealing with pot holes. I'm after isolating the high frequency/chatter bump stuff from the seat, and it seems to be doing that just fine! -Al
 

Feliz

Well-Known Member
The Kinekt has different coloured spring not different numbers. The Thudbuster and Bodyfloat are not the same post. Unless my memory is failing even worse than I thought.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
New Thudbuster owner here, pretty impressed with just one short ride on it. I was checking out seat posts on Amazon. My butt doesn't hurt bad enough to justify what they get for a Kinekt, but when I saw a "used" Thudbuster in the size I needed (Rad 27.2) available for 87 dollars, I jumped on it. Amazon used I've learned recently, is mostly stuff that's been returned for one reason or another and is generally in new condition. So I rolled the dice and won. It arrived in perfect "unused" condition and even had a couple of extra #9 cushions that came with it in addition to the 2 lighter ones that are supposed to come with it. I'm 300lbs, so I put a #7 and a #9 together and gave that a try (1 step down from the firmest available). So far, kinda glad I didn't pair up the ultra stiff #9's as their documentation suggested. First impression is it's going to do what I wanted, which isn't really looking for a lot of travel to try and soak up jumps off curbs and dealing with pot holes. I'm after isolating the high frequency/chatter bump stuff from the seat, and it seems to be doing that just fine! -Al
Not a bad price for a "new" Thudbuster LT! I recommend getting the boot that covers the elastomers. It keeps out the dirt and prolongs the life of the bushings.

I'm 260# and use a pair of #7's. The trick is to have the seat depress slightly when just sitting to allow you to "float". Then the rest of the 3" travel can be used to absorb shock. When set up this way, IMO, it beats the more expensive Kenekt post due to the extra travel.
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
What color springs would that be? There wasn't a color selection with the purchase.

And yes, I could select my weight category (100-150). My current seat post had the specs on it - just had to take it out and read the size.
I think it works this way: The weight category you purchase means that the correct springs for that weight are already installed. But you also get the other springs for different weights. This is just to save you the trouble of having to change them, but I'm pretty sure you could buy any weight category post and then change the springs (included) to get to the one you want.

At least that's how my post came. And I didn't have to change the springs... only needed to adjust the tension screw to get to the comfort level I wanted.
 

Handlebars

Active Member
I'm thinking of re-adjusting my Suntour so that it's able to really soften the continual lesser bangs rather than to protect from the biggest hits, because I can stand on the pedals for the bigger hits.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
A couple more short rides later, initial results confirmed. This Thudbuster CAN isolate my butt from the harsh high frequency chatter type bumps pretty effectively. Expansion joints in the pavement for instance, or even running on a single track/grass mix trail. This means I can relax a bit more while riding, but still prepared to get up off my seat for the larger hits. Testing/tweaking to continue. Raising the air pressure to reduce rolling resistance for instance. Previously, I would run it as low as I could to get the best ride possible. That may not be necessary any more! -Al
 
Here is an interesting alternative. PNW has a air suspension dropper post than can be tuned to the rider's weight. It has 40mm of travel and can have either internal or external actuator cable routing. It is priced at $179 USD.

I learned the hard way that one should not use the saddle as a handle for lifting the bike when you have a dropper as that strains and weakens the seals on the dropper air cartridge. I have one of these on order and will post my impressions when it has been installed and I have a chance to ride on it for while.
I'm in the club that learned not to lift with the saddle as well...

You have found a dropper to be very worthwhile, so the PNW might be a good fit, the only caveat I can see is the direction of travel is along the line of the seatpost. Years ago I had a suspension seatpost with that geometry which was better than nothing, but was left far behind by the performance of the Kinekt which moves down and back to absorb the shocks which come from the rear wheel hitting uneven surfaces.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I'm in the club that learned not to lift with the saddle as well...

You have found a dropper to be very worthwhile, so the PNW might be a good fit, the only caveat I can see is the direction of travel is along the line of the seatpost. Years ago I had a suspension seatpost with that geometry which was better than nothing, but was left far behind by the performance of the Kinekt which moves down and back to absorb the shocks which come from the rear wheel hitting uneven surfaces.
It is not feasible to do a dropper post with a parallelogram mechanism like the Kinekt or Thudbuster. The two functions are mutually exclusive. The shock mechanism takes up too much verticle space leaving too little vertical travel for the dropper to be effective.

I agree that the parallelogram configuration is superior for ergonomic shock absorption. However the adjustable air shock integrated within the post giving 40mm of shock travel leaves all the vertical travel in place for a useful dropper function. In my opinion, that is the correct compromise to make.

If I had a hard tail bike, I would favor the Kinekt as the suspension function would be first priority. On a full suspension bike like my Delight Mountain, the priority shifts to the dropper function for ease of mounting and comfort at stops. Getting a little added cush for the tush is a bonus with the PNW.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I was just asking and would advise that this one seems to good to be true and most like is. I really don't want to share any of my information with a ganef.
 
still kicking myself for all the years I was taking unnecessary pounding from the road, there should be a kinekt loaner / demo program for forum members so people can see what they're missing
 
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DaveMatthews

Well-Known Member
Indeed... here's the original, still not shipping...