Suspension Seat Posts

Al P

Active Member
INEFA's Shock Stop seatpost is definitely a scam. I'm still waiting for mine from Redshift, who has been emailing updates from the beginning. They are supposedly shipping now, but not for $39.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
New Thudbuster owner here, pretty impressed with just one short ride on it. I was checking out seat posts on Amazon. My butt doesn't hurt bad enough to justify what they get for a Kinekt, but when I saw a "used" Thudbuster in the size I needed (Rad 27.2) available for 87 dollars, I jumped on it. Amazon used I've learned recently, is mostly stuff that's been returned for one reason or another and is generally in new condition. So I rolled the dice and won. It arrived in perfect "unused" condition and even had a couple of extra #9 cushions that came with it in addition to the 2 lighter ones that are supposed to come with it. I'm 300lbs, so I put a #7 and a #9 together and gave that a try (1 step down from the firmest available). So far, kinda glad I didn't pair up the ultra stiff #9's as their documentation suggested. First impression is it's going to do what I wanted, which isn't really looking for a lot of travel to try and soak up jumps off curbs and dealing with pot holes. I'm after isolating the high frequency/chatter bump stuff from the seat, and it seems to be doing that just fine! -Al
I just got a thudbuster installed on my bike, too. It definitely soaks up a lot of the small jolts and makes riding less tiring. Takes the “hard” our of “hard tail”.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Timpo,
That illustration shows a pretty simple spring, and though many seats have springs built into them, that one is going to offer more travel.

A point that recently occurred to me though (I can be slow like that, so maybe everyone else has already considered this), is illustrated clearly in that pic. That's the point that most seats allow for a range of positions for the clamp to be fastened. My original thinking was that this "range" was to allow for different distances from the handlebars for rider positioning. What I just realized is that not only is that a factor, but you are also changing the leverage your weight has on the springs built into the rear of the seat!

The further forward the seat is positioned the more leverage your body weight has on those seat springs. The further back the seat is, the less leverage your body has on those springs.

Point here being, you might want to consider that when mounting your "cruiser" style seats (e.g Cloud 9). With the clamp mounted forward, I'm thinking it might be difficult to get full travel from thse springs even on bigger hits. With the clamp mounted towards the rear, the springs may bottom out frequently.

So, something that seemed so simple at first, suddenly becomes much more complicated! -Al
 

Handlebars

Active Member
Timpo,
That illustration shows a pretty simple spring, and though many seats have springs built into them, that one is going to offer more travel.

A point that recently occurred to me though (I can be slow like that, so maybe everyone else has already considered this), is illustrated clearly in that pic. That's the point that most seats allow for a range of positions for the clamp to be fastened. My original thinking was that this "range" was to allow for different distances from the handlebars for rider positioning. What I just realized is that not only is that a factor, but you are also changing the leverage your weight has on the springs built into the rear of the seat!

The further forward the seat is positioned the more leverage your body weight has on those seat springs. The further back the seat is, the less leverage your body has on those springs.

Point here being, you might want to consider that when mounting your "cruiser" style seats (e.g Cloud 9). With the clamp mounted forward, I'm thinking it might be difficult to get full travel from thse springs even on bigger hits. With the clamp mounted towards the rear, the springs may bottom out frequently.

So, something that seemed so simple at first, suddenly becomes much more complicated! -Al
To me it looks as if there are 2 ways to increase /decrease leverage - one is where the post joins the spring and the other is where the seat joins the spring
 

Handlebars

Active Member
I'd buy that if it didn't raise the seat even more. My suspension seatpost raised the seat to where feet flat on ground is still just possible. A combo of post and that spring could possibly give a ride that absorbs both small and big shocks.
Notice that the video shows the position with softest ride.
Also look at the angle on the seat...looks like way too much for comfort type bike.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I have an old saddle with a spring mounted on it that looks like this. I forget who makes it. I used it on one of my early MTB's. It works ok for absorbing shock but it has no side to side stability. Leaning to one side causes the seat to tilt sideways.

I don't know for sure but it seems like this product will do the same thing.
 

CSH

Active Member
I have an old saddle with a spring mounted on it that looks like this. I forget who makes it. I used it on one of my early MTB's. It works ok for absorbing shock but it has no side to side stability. Leaning to one side causes the seat to tilt sideways.

I don't know for sure but it seems like this product will do the same thing.
Yup, You can see a little Side-to-Side tilt happening in the video. :50 sec in to the vid.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Simple, Clean, Cheap... Brilliant! ;)
Scary! $16.50 and definitely a copycat. Imagine the damage to a riders buttocks when this spring fails. This is An Aliexpress item I’d run from. Add horizontal flex to vertical and...well...I cannot imagine it not failing. Add questionable source...

Top Rinsten, bottom Chinese copy.
 

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FlatSix911

Active Member
Scary! $16.50 and definitely a copycat. Imagine the damage to a riders buttocks when this spring fails. This is An Aliexpress item I’d run from. Add horizontal flex to vertical and...well...I cannot imagine it not failing. Add questionable source...

Top Rinsten, bottom Chinese copy.
Nonsense... more FUD. This item is available on Amazon with a 4 star review rating.
A decent seat suspension @$22 for someone who does not want to spend $250... YMMV ;)

 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Nonsense... more FUD. This item is available on Amazon with a 4 star review rating.
A decent seat suspension @$22 for someone who does not want to spend $250... YMMV ;)


Point taken. But IME It always pays to read reviews. A 4 star rating, of a product, could have 20% catastrophic failure rate. The Amazon version, IME with cheap Chinese knockoffs ought to scare a sensible buyer off. Maybe a fella that rides his bike once week or month, weighs under 150LBS won't snap the spring and drive it up his butt....

I'm 220 and until I went to a minimum purchase of just under $90,The NCX post, I destroyed every seat post suspension I tried. Some things just cost more. I don't ned the $250 version as I'm not an offload or dirt track rider. From my view this $16-$21 spring is a goofy design and on par with a Walmart bike. I can buy a new bike for $150, but find that sub $600 gets me a bike I can't live with and depend on daily. Someone will ALWAYS have a counterpoint, but that's my experience in 58 years of owning and riding a large range of bikes.

Amazing that even the 4 and 5 star ratings comments are enough to put me off....
I started with 2 star....

Took a lot of fiddling around to get it to work right. It often creates a seesaw effect where the horn of the saddle swings up into your groin. Outch. More painful than just hitting the bumps. Wouldn't recommend unless professionally installed. Want back to a bigger saddle with springs.

When using it on my mountain bike in rough terrain it works it’s way off.

Initially, this item was pretty much unusable, however, I changed the saddle to a more traditional narrow mtb saddle and turned the unit upside down to provide better stability.

Rad Mini kind of spongy even on the shortest setting

I want to like this product, but I have yet to find the spot where the suspension is not too loose or too tight.

Even though I only weigh 145 pounds I set the tension to the hardest ride position.

There is one design flaw. The Allen head bolt that clamps the seat to the spring keeps working lose.

The seat is sorta flippity floppity. Not sure yet if I will keep it on the bike. The seat tilts side to side and front to back
 

Readytoride

Active Member
@Mtl_Biker, @Alaskan -

My Kinekt arrived yesterday from Amazon, right on time. Hubby got a chance to examine it and was VERY impressed. We put it on the bike this morning, did a few adjustments as I tried it out... and away I went for a lovely 25.5 mile ride on our local mix of gravel and paved roads.

All I can say WOW!! This seatpost is INCREDIBLE!!

It floated over every bump, every washboard, every washout, every imperfection there was, bar none, on both types of roads. I felt like I was riding on air. What a fabulous feeling!!! I am blown away in love with it, and my ebike smile is now bigger than ever!!

I can now happily and comfortably incorporate close to 100 miles of local gravel roads into my cycling routes. Woohoo!! 😁

THANKS, GUYS!!!!
 

Mtl_Biker

Active Member
@Mtl_Biker, @Alaskan -

My Kinekt arrived yesterday from Amazon, right on time. Hubby got a chance to examine it and was VERY impressed. We put it on the bike this morning, did a few adjustments as I tried it out... and away I went for a lovely 25.5 mile ride on our local mix of gravel and paved roads.

All I can say WOW!! This seatpost is INCREDIBLE!!

It floated over every bump, every washboard, every washout, every imperfection there was, bar none, on both types of roads. I felt like I was riding on air. What a fabulous feeling!!! I am blown away in love with it, and my ebike smile is now bigger than ever!!

I can now happily and comfortably incorporate close to 100 miles of local gravel roads into my cycling routes. Woohoo!! 😁

THANKS, GUYS!!!!
Glad you're happy with it! I was, for some strange reason, totally against a suspension seat post (probably from being an OLD hard-core cyclist for more than 50 years) but after trying one, I was sold. World of difference. And maybe one factor is that now I'm riding an e-bike, at consistantly higher speeds, than I was riding a road bike (when I was younger). And by not pedaling quite as hard, at speed, I felt bumps like I hadn't before. (Maybe my butt got softer?) Anyway, I'm completely sold on using a quality suspension seat post on an e-bike. Thanks to @Alaskan and @Thomas Jaszewski for all the recommendations and good great advice!
 

Bobsiii

Active Member
Nonsense... more FUD. This item is available on Amazon with a 4 star review rating.
A decent seat suspension @$22 for someone who does not want to spend $250... YMMV ;)

I tried it, threw it out. Side to side, front and back, it's like being in a rowboat in a Perfect Storm.