The next (new) juiced bike . Juiced scorpion

CarlB

Member
stillFrame3.jpg
stillFrame2.jpg


Stills from the video. Makes the bike look pretty small. Or low. If the seat was up 3 or 4 inches, it might work.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
What watt hours per mile do people get on the Scrambler, with and without pedaling?

Given the compromised mechanical position, pedaling may not help energy efficiency much. I imagine most of the reason it's designed this way is to come under ebike regulations instead of moped ones.

Would be cool to sell an aftermarket add on to replace the pedals and crank with stationary footrests.

Thanks for the stills, Carl.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
Just got an email saying pre-ordering starts tomorrow at 6 am pacific time. I'm undecided at this moment. On the one hand, it looks really cool, plus full suspension. On the other hand, why do I need another ebike, I don't ride my current one nearly enough.

And the Hyper overlaps my current bike performance wise (upgraded Radrover that does 30+ mph, with hydraulic brakes). So why spend $2000 to do the same thing.

Decisions decisions...
 

CarlB

Member
Juiced is replying to some questions about height with some standard copy: "The Scorpion and HyperScorpion are a great alternative for shorter riders that may find the Scrambler too tall to ride! Both the Scorpion and HyperScorpion will have a standard 30.9” saddle height, but an optional tall seat (33.5”) will be available for an additional fee."

What do you all think? Will 2-1/2 inches in seat height (33.5" seat height) be enough to make this work for someone 6'1"? My inseam is about 32.5 inches.

I want an ebike, I just don't know if this will work. I like everything about it except it's size. I worry I may need the Scorpion El Grande Edition with 24-inch plus tires and a few inches more in seat and handlebar height. Unfortunately it only exists in my mind.
 

CarlB

Member
I'm not going to do the Scorpion pre-order. The specs are out there now and the cheapest prices were close to gone. I think I'll wait for the thing to get into production and some reviews are out and I have time to study the specs. I think Juiced is a good company, but I don't like the pressure of buy now before I know what I'm getting. Add to that the trade situation with China and other new bikes coming out... I just feel better waiting. If I end up going with the Scorpion, Juiced makes a few hundred dollars extra, I get a known production bike and all is well. :)
 
Last edited:

FlatSix911

Active Member
"My one complaint is about the size of the bike. I’m a tall-ish guy at a little over six feet tall, and I prefer to not have my knees bumping into my elbows when I ride."

https://www.theverge.com/2019/9/24/20875870/juiced-scorpion-ebike-price-specs-release

I really hope they do make a larger frame Scorpion. Maybe with 24 inch plus tires like I joked/mentioned before.
Perhaps a new seat is in order... a quick history of the 60/70's mini bike ;)





1569380012567.png
1569380182598.png



Because it wasn’t good enough to only invent one hobby, Duffy Livingstone’s Go-Kart Manufacturing Company also popularized the minibike, which was first known as the Go-Kart Cycle. Many imitators popped up, the magazines covered the new racing scene, and in 1960, Rod & Custom dubbed them minibikes. They are still hot today, and ROADKILL’s own Joe Sebergandio is leading the charge with his annual Joe’s Minibike Reunion (JoesMinibikeReunion.net). The guy in the photo is Duffy himself.
 
Last edited:

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
A mini bike that happens to have pedals. My harley Davidson mini bike back in the 70's, was a lot of fun. Scorpion is a cool looking mini for kids or teens. Of course there are adults wanting to relive their 'yutes.' I'd opt for mag wheels, as the spokes will probably get shredded. Too bad they didn't offer the blue color with the mags.
 

CarlB

Member
More detailed information from Electrek...
Thanks FlatSix911. I see the same thing, again though: "The downside, as I mentioned previously, is that it is a laid back pedalling position and it is hard to get full leg extension for moderate to tall folks." I love everything about the bike but the size. :(
 

FlatSix911

Active Member
Thanks FlatSix911. I see the same thing, again though:
"The downside, as I mentioned previously, is that it is a laid back pedalling position and it is hard to get full leg extension for moderate to tall folks." I love everything about the bike but the size. :(
I agree... perhaps you could add a riser to the seat along with raising the handle bars.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
Is there any bike or this shape or Scrambler's that is 24"? That would be perfect ergonomically, a fat tire of that size would have a total tire diameter very similar to a road bike.

And looking at the Scrambler now, honestly the frame is kind of ugly because the rear is perched so far above the wheel. If it were 24", you wouldn't have that problem.

Of course overall wheelbase would grow.
 

andyraf

New Member
I'm curious what hub motor the hyper uses. I read it's a 1000w Bafang, but I wasn't aware they made a hub motor that powerful. Is it a new Bafang motor, or a MAC from other hyper models, or are they just running the regular Bafang at way higher power?
 

CarlB

Member
Is it a new Bafang motor, or a MAC from other hyper models, or are they just running the regular Bafang at way higher power?
From their comments and videos from the Scrambler launch, it sounded like the MAC controller was a pain to get programmed right. But I don't know if that means they are leveraging what they learned from that or if they think they can do better with something else.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
I'm curious what hub motor the hyper uses. I read it's a 1000w Bafang, but I wasn't aware they made a hub motor that powerful. Is it a new Bafang motor, or a MAC from other hyper models, or are they just running the regular Bafang at way higher power?
It sounds like what they are just feeding 33A to a G060 bafang. That motor can take a lot more than 750w, the weak spot are might the input wiring. I'm running a G060 750w on 52v and a 35A controller, only difference is that I have Kenda off road fat tires. So here's the kind of performance you can expect: 31mph on throttle alone, ~33 mph on PAS. The max speed with no load was 37 mph so in theory, you can expect assist up to that point.
 

andyraf

New Member
It sounds like what they are just feeding 33A to a G060 bafang. That motor can take a lot more than 750w, the weak spot are might the input wiring. I'm running a G060 750w on 52v and a 35A controller, only difference is that I have Kenda off road fat tires. So here's the kind of performance you can expect: 31mph on throttle alone, ~33 mph on PAS. The max speed with no load was 37 mph so in theory, you can expect assist up to that point.
So my next question... any way to retrofit a more powerful controller to a CCX? Not looking to do it now, but would be nice to know if the option we're available down the road.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
So my next question... any way to retrofit a more powerful controller to a CCX? Not looking to do it now, but would be nice to know if the option we're available down the road.
I don't think there's any 3rd party upgrade controller available yet. So any solution would require you to rewire (and figuring out which wire is which) a new controller to matching connectors with Juiced bikes. Plus find one that fits into the frame where the controller sits.

Kyle from Bolton ebikes, who sells the controller upgrade kit for the Radrover, said in a Q & A few months ago that he's looking into something for the Juiced bikes, when someone asked him about it.