Throwing your leg over an E-Bike

#1
Have a RadRover and just put on the Ibera rack and quick attach bag. The combo sits higher than the seat buy about 6”. I’m 73 and 6’2” and it is hard for me to swing my leg over the bike with it on. Have two replaced knees. 3 hip replacements. Arthritis in my L5. I found I can remove the bag, swing my leg over, then twist around reattach bag. Sure I’m not the only one that has this problem. Has any have any tricks I could try?
 
#3
Yeah, but I had no problem with my Cannondale manual and have no problem without the bag. Guess I didn’t foresee the problem or I might have even bought a different rack and bag. It sure is a slick setup though.
 
#4
The older I get, the stiffer my muscles get. Hasn't affected my heart health or endurance, but agility is way down. See the drop frame left. I am not a girl. I started having trouble getting over the bar in my early sixties. Glad you are a decade behind me in stiffness. I'm 68.
I do 30 toe touches with twist bidaily, plus the quad stretches, but that just gets me limber enough to get down the stairs.
 

JayVee

Well-Known Member
#5
If you still have some strength in your arms, back, and upper body, you could try this:

- Make both pedals level (horizontal). Put the outer pedal to the back of the bike.
- Step away from the bike by about a foot whilst holding the handlebars firmly with both hands
- Now tilt the bike towards you as much as you can.
- With the lowered height of the bike, step over the frame and progressively right the bike up again.


Other step over technique:

Grab the handlebars with your left arm and the saddle with your right arm. Lift your foot and place it on top the frame. If you can make it that far, lowering your leg to the other side is usually pretty easy. Go slowly and make sure you don't get tangled in the pedals!!!


You might want to ask someone to assist you the first time, if you're not sure you have enough strength or mobility in your legs.
 
#6
Have a RadRover and just put on the Ibera rack and quick attach bag. The combo sits higher than the seat buy about 6”. I’m 73 and 6’2” and it is hard for me to swing my leg over the bike with it on. Have two replaced knees. 3 hip replacements. Arthritis in my L5. I found I can remove the bag, swing my leg over, then twist around reattach bag. Sure I’m not the only one that has this problem. Has any have any tricks I could try?
The step through is the way to go. I have either a basket for errands or a trunk bag or panniers.
 
#7
Have a RadRover and just put on the Ibera rack and quick attach bag. The combo sits higher than the seat buy about 6”. I’m 73 and 6’2” and it is hard for me to swing my leg over the bike with it on. Have two replaced knees. 3 hip replacements. Arthritis in my L5. I found I can remove the bag, swing my leg over, then twist around reattach bag. Sure I’m not the only one that has this problem. Has any have any tricks I could try?
My Right knee has been replaced, and I'm 6' and my Specialized Mtb has a Rack on it. My method of mounting is to Lower the bike to the Left before mounting my Steed . 👍 Maybe this might work for you, and maybe play with seat height ?
 
#9
It’s too bad you can’t use a mounting block for bikes the way you can for horses, isn’t it?
I've actually thought of something like that. My hips, knees and lower spine are shot (I'm in my early fifties) and I can barely make it over a step through frame now. I have a couple of small step stools from a dollar store, they're about a foot high and a foot by 6 inches in size. I've seriously considered strapping one of those to my rear rack using some bungy cord. Right now I can step a foot away from the bike and tilt it towards me to get my foot over, but the other day my toe caught in the frame and I ended up face first in a mud hole.
 
#10
If you still have some strength in your arms, back, and upper body, you could try this:

- Make both pedals level (horizontal). Put the outer pedal to the back of the bike.
- Step away from the bike by about a foot whilst holding the handlebars firmly with both hands
- Now tilt the bike towards you as much as you can.
- With the lowered height of the bike, step over the frame and progressively right the bike up again.


Other step over technique:

Grab the handlebars with your left arm and the saddle with your right arm. Lift your foot and place it on top the frame. If you can make it that far, lowering your leg to the other side is usually pretty easy. Go slowly and make sure you don't get tangled in the pedals!!!


You might want to ask someone to assist you the first time, if you're not sure you have enough strength or mobility in your legs.
JayVee- It is funny you mention this technique, as I have developed this from a very young age back in the days when my dino-bike had a bag of rolled newspapers strapped to the handlebars supported by hooks and the front fender. By natural instinct, I always tilted the bike towards me to mount and dismount during deliveries. So, today, it is second nature for me to always get on/off my bike this way. Some things are just instinctive to each one of us when simply riding a bike. If it works for you just don't fix it. :cool:
 
#11
It’s too bad you can’t use a mounting block for bikes the way you can for horses, isn’t it?
I have a large milk crate for carrying groceries on the back and am still able to step over the frame although some days it is a bit of a challenge if I am stiff. I will stand on the firewood chopping block at home to mount the bike and there is usually a curb or bench handy after I reach my destination to remount after shopping.
 
#13
I've actually thought of something like that. My hips, knees and lower spine are shot (I'm in my early fifties) and I can barely make it over a step through frame now. I have a couple of small step stools from a dollar store, they're about a foot high and a foot by 6 inches in size. I've seriously considered strapping one of those to my rear rack using some bungy cord. Right now I can step a foot away from the bike and tilt it towards me to get my foot over, but the other day my toe caught in the frame and I ended up face first in a mud hole.
I hope you are ok. Your step stool idea sounds great. I hope it works. At least we don’t have to worry about our bikes taking a stroll away from the “mounting block” as horses sometimes do.
 
#14
In a rare moment of foresight, I ordered a step thru R + M last year. When I rode it the first few times, I found myself habitually swinging my leg over the top. I thought briefly, hmmm, maybe I didn't need a step thru. Then I banged my shin on the rack the other day and I congratulated myself for my clairvoyance.

Sounds like tilting/leaning the bike over is the best way to go.
 
#16
In a rare moment of foresight, I ordered a step thru R + M last year. When I rode it the first few times, I found myself habitually swinging my leg over the top. I thought briefly, hmmm, maybe I didn't need a step thru. Then I banged my shin on the rack the other day and I congratulated myself for my clairvoyance.

Sounds like tilting/leaning the bike over is the best way to go.
I'm Considering 3 different models for my new Ebike. One of them is a step thru, The Scoozy Veego 750 Mini Fat bike. The Rack is built in to the frame . 👍
 
#17
If you still have some strength in your arms, back, and upper body, you could try this:

- Make both pedals level (horizontal). Put the outer pedal to the back of the bike.
- Step away from the bike by about a foot whilst holding the handlebars firmly with both hands
- Now tilt the bike towards you as much as you can.
- With the lowered height of the bike, step over the frame and progressively right the bike up again.


Other step over technique:

Grab the handlebars with your left arm and the saddle with your right arm. Lift your foot and place it on top the frame. If you can make it that far, lowering your leg to the other side is usually pretty easy. Go slowly and make sure you don't get tangled in the pedals!!!


You might want to ask someone to assist you the first time, if you're not sure you have enough strength or mobility in your legs.
Thanks JayVee
I’ve used the first method and works fine for my short legs. I find it helps to hold the brake levers hard to help stabilize the bike.

I Googled that Ibera bag and omg that thing is ginormous. Looks like cycling with a piece of luggage. Maybe time for panniers. Or smaller bag and riding with less “stuff “.
My 2 cents.
 
#18
There’s a previous thread called mounting and dismounting. I use the following approach mentionEd in the thread, my wife describes it like mounting a horse:

I'm 52 and have no trouble mounting the diamond frame bikes even with panniers or trunk bags in place. I push off on one pedal and swing a leg over whilst the bike is in motion. My wife sees me do that and comments that she is afraid to try it. If I'm honest, probably on occasion my leg brushes the trunk bag or pannier. On our Terns which she rides and are like step-thru bikes (because the top tube is so low to the ground), I will mount by stepping through and then pushing myself onto the saddle. So for bikes I alone ride I only want a bike with a top tube (not step thru) but for bikes she and I both ride or she rides its gotta be a step thru style. Court comments frequently in his reviews that many of the bikes are more of a mid-step design vs a true step thru. Thus offering increased rigidity whilst still allowing for an easier mount.
 
#20
Umm buy a woman's bike, i'm considering it with a bad back, not into style, more function.
Actually they are now called “step through” bikes, although there are bikes out there specifically designed for a women’s proportions (shorter upper body); these may be step through or step over.
If you have a bad back, you may need to do some looking, and ride before you buy-/my upper body has shrunk pretty dramatically thanks to scoliosis and disc disease. I’ve gone from 5’8” to 5’5”, although my legs have stayed the same length. This has put me on a small bike frame, but I’ve had to play with the stem and seat height.