TomTom Multisport GPS Watch & Others

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Thinking about a TomTom with heart rate. Want to upgrade by downsizing my current bike mountable Garmin.

Experience?
Opinions?
Advice?
Other Sport-Watches?
 

Noreen

Member
I'm waiting to see the Apple Watch - which I think is going to be introduced Monday. It might be too small for GPS, but might be better than my i-Phone mounted on a handle bar. Which Garmin are you using?
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I'm waiting to see the Apple Watch - which I think is going to be introduced Monday. It might be too small for GPS, but might be better than my i-Phone mounted on a handle bar. Which Garmin are you using?
Hey Noreen, I'll be interested to see the Apple, I saw a blurb on the news yesterday. Don't think I'll wait for a reasonable price on one though, I've never owned an iphone. It may spark competition. I'm using a 6 year old Garmin etrex, time for an upgrade.
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
I use Microsoft Band. It has a gps enabled Biking function that provides stats, heartbeat, elevations and mapping in one.
Interesting product. Microsoft is forced to go cross platform, so you get support for Android you'll never get from Apple (any time soon). Plus the price is right.

I generally just run Google's 'My Tracks' program on a budget Android, to get data and a map, at the end. (You can get a serviceable Android phone sub $100). The GPS in the Band supplies the basics. Most of these heart monitors are unreliable at higher heart rates. I use a chest strap when I want that info, and yet another wrist device. How well does the Band work for HRate?

The Apple watch does seem to have a moving map. That's kind of cool for GPS functionality. The Sony SmartWatch 3 has the GPS, but the Android wear OS doesn't integrate to Google Maps just yet. Which is typical of Google. Lots of potential, much of it 'coming soon'. I was looking at the Sony over Christmas, on sale for $300. Now it's $230 at Amazon. I think they want to move the product before the April iLaunch?

Don't know where MS Health will end up:

That being said, Microsoft seems to be on to something with its Health platform. The software still has some kinks, and it's unclear how close the company is to delivering on its ambitious promises. But the focus is right. Rather than worrying too much about how many steps you took or how many calories you ate, Microsoft Health aims to provide insight into your broader well-being. That could mean helping you avoid skin cancer, or taking care of that balky knee you insist on running on. There's obviously room to grow, but compared to its primary competitors -- which happen to be locked to a single mobile platform -- Microsoft Health seems to have the most promise. (Engadget)
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
The promise of the Band was that it uses 'better' technology to measure heart rate. They calling optical heart rate monitor.

The optical heart rate monitor in your Microsoft Band uses a light sensor to detect minor fluctuations in your capillaries. The heart rate monitor is located on the back of the clasp. You’ll see a green light when it’s active.


Whether it is better is really hard to tell, in my opinion, it doesn't matter too much. I will let the analRetentives and planted naysayers to argue one brand over another. For me it is important to observe TRENDS of my heart rate over time. In other words let's just say that the three brands have different results to my average heart rate

Apple's monitor 67
Microsoft Band 70
Android 75

as long as their measurements are relatively consistent then by observing improvements and deviations over time I would have received the info I am after.
 

Noreen

Member
I am not that impressed with the Apple Watch. I am all-in with Apple products, and would like a GPS cycling computer. I don't really need the high-end stuff like heart rate, power meters, etc. I just don't see the Apple Watch as the solution. Of course, that could all change with a visit to the Apple store. I was considering a Magellan/Mio 505 (?); or the Garmin Edge Touring, but for now am using my iPhone on the handle bar.

Because I like to get off the main roads, I frequently get lost - and it really annoys me. I rarely get lost in the car, but it happens a lot cycling. I think I am paying more attention to the scenery and traffic, than which direction I am going.

I might look at the Microsoft Band - I never even looked at that/heard of it. Does it need a monthly subscription?
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I too have taken a quick look at the MS Band, I need to look at the details. As @Noreen noted, I'm wondering about unit and ongoing costs. @Brambor can you give us a first hand accounting of the costs?
 

Noreen

Member
I don't see that it has built in GPS/mapping. It does seem to track where you've gone, but not give directions - which is what I need. "TURN RIGHT - OK, you missed it. Turn around, and try again." Maybe I'll stick with the Garmin or Mio. Also, when I left MS for Apple products in 2009, I vowed I would never return.
 

Brambor

Well-Known Member
MS Band will not give you directions. It will map your route and measure your heart rate and number of 'steps' you've taken during that route. It will also show your speed at various sections and color code them on the map. There is no monthly cost. There is no subscription.

It does many other things in addition to this, mainely connects to your emails and facebook and text messaging and shows you those on the watch. That comes in handy at some meetings where checking your cell phone might be inappropriate :)

It also has a starbucks card feature so you can just walk to the counter and scan the barcode directly from the watch

It has a UV sensor to tell you to put on sunscreen - that sounded like a cool feature but I have never really used it

If you do workouts it does connect to those couch to marathon (or something like that) guides and other workouts where you get coached at intervals

It buzzes you every mile if you set it to workout or bike or run mode

It has alarm feature, missed calls, weather forecast info

It has a cool sleep function where it measures your quality of sleep - I really like that
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
The Band sounds pretty decent. I have this feeling a lot of this stuff will come together in the next year, especially with Apple in the game. GPS is getting cheap, but they need the map in some form. Everything feels a little 'not quite there'. I know the cardio people want to hit high pulse rates, but I'm not convinced a wrist band is accurate enough for them. A lot of people are in this space, with products.

http://www.connectedly.com/smartwatch-buyers-guide?nopaging=1
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
Thank goodness for GPS on smartphones though. There are topographical maps one can load on their phone and of course specialty GPS gadgets one can purchase for on road and off-road tracking. I tend to not pay good attention to where I am exactly when I'm riding on my bike. Bad habit I know, but it's very different than when I'm driving my car.
 

PowerMe

Well-Known Member
LOL. I practically need GPS to get out of my driveway. I'm directionally challenged at times, but at least I know it and use the appropriate tools. Garmin Nuvi GPS in my car and Google maps or other GPS on my phone.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Any opinions on the Fitbit line? Specifically the Surge. Same type of device as the MS Band, I think...
 
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PowerMe

Well-Known Member
I worked at a company for several months on contract and they were designing a website to integrate with Fitbit and other fitness tracking wearable devices so their members could upload the stats. I noticed that people tend to stop wearing their devices after about 6 months. This is not a scientific study, it's just something I noticed. The people at that company were able to get a Fitbit for super cheap, like a fraction of the cost. Like any fad it took off and then waned. By the end of my contract I hardly saw anyone wearing such a device.

For cyclists, the existing wearable devices like Fitbit don't track all the metrics that cyclists want/need to track. For runners and walkers they're fine.
 

Mike leroy

Active Member
Apple announced iwatch integration with Strava, which will be popular.

I actually develop iphone apps that deal with health. You would think that I would be heavily into the iwatch. When I exercise, I like to escape technology. My iPod touch is my favorite, because it is small and contains 64Gigs of music. No cell phone connection to disturb me. I bring the iPhone for emergency only.

I just pay attention to my breathing and sweat levels. I like the freedom to run or walk based on how the mood strikes me at the moment. Sometimes, My feet just start running all by themselves. At other times, I take in a beautiful view or animal. I really do not want technology to intrude. The spontaneous moments are the best part of my day.