Tongsheng Motor Kit installed as Reviewed here on EBR

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
In case anyone is interested, we can sell you this kit, for the same $999 shown, and fully install for just $50. For Chicago area consumers or anyone who can bring their bike in.
https://electricbikereview.com/eunorau/48v-500w-tongsheng-mid-motor-kit/

We've installed a number of these, and our customers love them, getting in many cases a much better bike that they know fits them, while having the benefit of a great price. We extend the warranty and also do a much cleaner product for wiring. On some designs we can run wiring internally. Also the range on these can go further than many stock ebikes, with how they have designed their torque sensing, the options available for gearing.

The 850c color display is awesome, being better quality than most stock OEM displays, including the phone charge port, and 9 levels of assist. Also, the entire bike weight is usually 10 to 20 lbs lighter than most OEM ebikes... 30lbs lighter than Pedegos. Depends of course on your current bike weight. We know it to be true for the Biria 's, Jamis, and Trek models we've outfitted, just to name a few.

See one of our testimonials on this exact kit conversion purchased by Steve and Amy Feder.

Www.mikese-bikes.com
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
I have used the TSDZ2, but as a 52v x 16A system, for a few years now. The earlier systems had some issues that over time have been addressed by TongShen so I feel that is a plus that they were willing to listen to their customers and make the necessary improvements.

My use is primarily rugged mtb terrain which as alluded to in the review should be possible and I will agree that it is. The torque sensing as noted is very good and what originally drew me to the system as I never could get to like any cadence based system enough to invest in one. Although mine has 4 levels of assist I only use the lowest, Eco, level even when climbing stupid steep and gnarly single track. If you have low enough gearing, which is a bit hard to do because a 42t front chainring is the lowest you can use while having reasonable chainline in the lowest cogs in the cassette and I have a 46t back there, I have yet to find a slope it won't conquer while following an existing trail or road. But I also did a 25 mile group road ride one time and have on other occasions drafted a few roadies and taken some pulls with the system also. Although I prefer my hub bikes for road use for getting to the trailhead it does ok.

The reason why I stick with it is the fact that it is the only mid drive system of this power output that has torque sensing and a throttle. I use it just as the reviewer does, for starting off from a dead stop, no matter if it is flat or on an incline, and the odd burp now and for that it is indispensable I feel. But as I always pedal and the TA system is so good that is what I use 99% of the time.

I feel that for a little over a thousand as is being advertised here that these are a very viable option if you have a bike that suits your needs as it will provide as much performance or more than most of the manufacturers bikes. It does take a bit of work to get it on there but the more shops like Mikes that offer the service and back them after the sale the better. A full install for $50 is quite frankly a deal.
 

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Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Thanks JRA for the extra testimonial and experience you related. I've got it at this competitive install price to simply get more people into ebikes. It's a challenge to find any good quality ebike at a price point below $1400, so if someone has a good bike to start with, and its comfortable, besides saving money, you're ' re-purposing' your bike and saving resources by not discarding it, and extending it's useful life.

And if the ebike lowers people's car use, that helps the environment too, while gaining better physical health.

There are so many good regular bikes out there going back a lot of years, that people spent good money on, and those same quality bike's cost hundreds more at today's prices. If they need new tires, tune up, or brakes, etc. will do that for them as well. (At an added cost of course, but still reasonable).

Ps. Added a photo of one conversion. Bike is new in this case. I should have taken more photos but at least can get an idea of wiring (use braided shield to minimize having wires everywhere) and on step thru designs usually have to go with rear rack mount battery. Added dual kick stand, suspension seat post, comfy Bikeroo seat, mirror and ergo grips. Cobra rubber clasps work great,since they have slot for cable. Cleaner than just zip ties.
 

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linklemming

Active Member
I have used the TSDZ2, but as a 52v x 16A system, for a few years now. The earlier systems had some issues that over time have been addressed by TongShen so I feel that is a plus that they were willing to listen to their customers and make the necessary improvements.

My use is primarily rugged mtb terrain which as alluded to in the review should be possible and I will agree that it is. The torque sensing as noted is very good and what originally drew me to the system as I never could get to like any cadence based system enough to invest in one. Although mine has 4 levels of assist I only use the lowest, Eco, level even when climbing stupid steep and gnarly single track. If you have low enough gearing, which is a bit hard to do because a 42t front chainring is the lowest you can use while having reasonable chainline in the lowest cogs in the cassette and I have a 46t back there, I have yet to find a slope it won't conquer while following an existing trail or road. But I also did a 25 mile group road ride one time and have on other occasions drafted a few roadies and taken some pulls with the system also. Although I prefer my hub bikes for road use for getting to the trailhead it does ok.

The reason why I stick with it is the fact that it is the only mid drive system of this power output that has torque sensing and a throttle. I use it just as the reviewer does, for starting off from a dead stop, no matter if it is flat or on an incline, and the odd burp now and for that it is indispensable I feel. But as I always pedal and the TA system is so good that is what I use 99% of the time.

I feel that for a little over a thousand as is being advertised here that these are a very viable option if you have a bike that suits your needs as it will provide as much performance or more than most of the manufacturers bikes. It does take a bit of work to get it on there but the more shops like Mikes that offer the service and back them after the sale the better. A full install for $50 is quite frankly a deal.
Very well stated, it is a nice system (which is why I bought one with 52V battery).

I am running the opensource software on mine (never ran stock software) and have it setup to output up to 650watts.

I am running the brass gear and its too noisy IMHO even with the later revision helical secondary gears right by the chainrings.

I only now use this bike for dirtier rides and will probably be taking the tsdz2 off in the near future.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Very well stated, it is a nice system (which is why I bought one with 52V battery).

I am running the opensource software on mine (never ran stock software) and have it setup to output up to 650watts.

I am running the brass gear and its too noisy IMHO even with the later revision helical secondary gears right by the chainrings.

I only now use this bike for dirtier rides and will probably be taking the tsdz2 off in the near future.
Did your mod's make it noisy ? It's an otherwise very quiet motor in Stock configurations.
 

linklemming

Active Member
Did your mod's make it noisy ? It's an otherwise very quiet motor in Stock configurations.
The brass gear is known to be noisier which is why I mentioned it. I ran the brass gear from day 1 as stripping this gear seemed pretty common and I didnt want to have the bike breakdown 20 miles from home.
 

linklemming

Active Member
The brass gear is known to be noisier which is why I mentioned it. I ran the brass gear from day 1 as stripping this gear seemed pretty common and I didnt want to have the bike breakdown 20 miles from home.
I just recently opened the motor up and checked all bearings(all seemed good) and regreased and same noise
 

JRA

Well-Known Member
I don’t use, but am aware of, the open source firmware as I have never had issue with the original 52v controller and display as it is. I have the brass gear and straight cut drive gear but have no noise complaint using red lithium grease.

My biggest complaint, as I use the bike on technical terrain, is ground clearance followed by the inability to run less than a 42t chainring. I had gone pretty far down the rabbit hole of getting a bike made with the Bafang M600 integrated motor as it has a throttle option but wasn’t happy with the level of support Bafang is providing for that platform at this time.
 

linklemming

Active Member
I don’t use, but am aware of, the open source firmware as I have never had issue with the original 52v controller and display as it is. I have the brass gear and straight cut drive gear but have no noise complaint using red lithium grease.

My biggest complaint, as I use the bike on technical terrain, is ground clearance followed by the inability to run less than a 42t chainring. I had gone pretty far down the rabbit hole of getting a bike made with the Bafang M600 integrated motor as it has a throttle option but wasn’t happy with the level of support Bafang is providing for that platform at this time.
Im also using the red lithium grease (lucas red and tacky).

At its quietest(about 2 rides in), it was about the same as a shimano e8000 mid drive demo I rode for a few weeks.

Who knows if its just me (I favor the quietest drives possible having bought a brose equipped mid-drive bike for that reason) or something wrong with my tsdz2. Everything looked fine when I regreased it. I have considered buying another but would be pretty bummed if they both did it.

I do hear the same noise on tsdz2 youtube videos although couldnt really hear it in the EBR review.

The noise is more pronounced when spinning at lower assist at high cadence. If I shift up and use higher assist it does quiet down a tad.

I set it up as my own DIY speed pedelec MTB hardtail(with climbing ability) as a project. With the 42T chainring on 26inch MTB tires it really only goes around 25 or so, any higher requires a bit of effort (potential motor cadence limit). My Juiced CCX with same 42t/11 gears gets up to 28(speed limited) with less effort. Difference could also be the whole mid-drive vs hub motor at speed/big chainring efficiency thing
 
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JRA

Well-Known Member
Don't get me wrong it is not totally silent as there is still a low growl but as you suggest the unit runs quieter at a lower cadence as I probably average around 60/70 rpm on my mtb whereas on my road bikes more like 90/100. However I don't ever find higher assist modes than Eco necessary so don't spin out much unless on the road at times with a 42/11 but it is my experience that after 25mph, pretty much where my 29" wheel bike tops out also, that gear becomes pretty ineffective anyway.

Drive train efficiency is known to suffer some at higher speeds but it is still important to have a high enough ratio to be able to over come that and still be able to effectively pedal. On my hub bikes I have higher gear ratio's to use via my Schlumpf bb drives, 45t/11 on the speed drive which is maxed out around 28 mph and 60t/11 on the high speed drive which you can still pedal along effectively on top of the motor at speeds well over 30 mph.

This is one of the things I am suspicious about with most of the manufacturer Class 3 bikes in that while they provide a high enough gear ratio to achieve 28mph the human effect is null because the gearing is maxed out and at that point you are just hamstering with little human input being applied. But if you put higher gearing via a larger chain ring on the motor will just assist up to the new limit, unless limited via software, and the same problem occurs. That is why I like to keep PAS out of the equation on my road bikes as I can tailor the motor assistance to my input and stay on top of the motor instead of the other way around at any speed without having to adjust the assist level relative to the gear ratio required for my desired input vs. speed over terrain.

Of my three eBikes my Grin All Axle hub motor is the quietest, as in silent, no matter what the watt output or torque being asked of it. My 9c has a steady buzz that isn't that loud but odd enough that it will turn peoples heads when I approach them which actually works out ok on MUP's. The funny thing is that once you ride a silent eBike that kind of spoils you for any that aren't I suppose.
 

linklemming

Active Member
Don't get me wrong it is not totally silent as there is still a low growl but as you suggest the unit runs quieter at a lower cadence as I probably average around 60/70 rpm on my mtb whereas on my road bikes more like 90/100. However I don't ever find higher assist modes than Eco necessary so don't spin out much unless on the road at times with a 42/11 but it is my experience that after 25mph, pretty much where my 29" wheel bike tops out also, that gear becomes pretty ineffective anyway.

Drive train efficiency is known to suffer some at higher speeds but it is still important to have a high enough ratio to be able to over come that and still be able to effectively pedal. On my hub bikes I have higher gear ratio's to use via my Schlumpf bb drives, 45t/11 on the speed drive which is maxed out around 28 mph and 60t/11 on the high speed drive which you can still pedal along effectively on top of the motor at speeds well over 30 mph.

This is one of the things I am suspicious about with most of the manufacturer Class 3 bikes in that while they provide a high enough gear ratio to achieve 28mph the human effect is null because the gearing is maxed out and at that point you are just hamstering with little human input being applied. But if you put higher gearing via a larger chain ring on the motor will just assist up to the new limit, unless limited via software, and the same problem occurs. That is why I like to keep PAS out of the equation on my road bikes as I can tailor the motor assistance to my input and stay on top of the motor instead of the other way around at any speed without having to adjust the assist level relative to the gear ratio required for my desired input vs. speed over terrain.

Of my three eBikes my Grin All Axle hub motor is the quietest, as in silent, no matter what the watt output or torque being asked of it. My 9c has a steady buzz that isn't that loud but odd enough that it will turn peoples heads when I approach them which actually works out ok on MUP's. The funny thing is that once you ride a silent eBike that kind of spoils you for any that aren't I suppose.
Thanks for the feedback on the Grin motor, I have been researching that for awhile but was concerned about the noise mentioned by grin. I am definately spoiled by my silent brose.

At speed, you dont notice the noise much on the TSDZ2.

I do love the simple no clutter/clean installation of the TSDZ2. I have been debating a bafang BBS02 for years but just dont like how cadence only sensor systems work.
 
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