Upgrade Yukon 750 Light?

NevadaRocks

New Member
I was wondering if anybody has upgraded the front light on their Yukon? I measured the power goin to the stock light and it is providing 50 VDC at 24 mA (or 1.2 Watts). I see that a number of the more robust lights out on the market can demand up to 7.5 watts of power. I am a bit concerned that pulling that amount of power through the controller may damage whatever component controls that output. I really want to keep the control through the panel working and use the main battery as the power source, therefore, I have ruled out externally powered units. I was just curious if anyone had accomplished this upgrade.
 

Jamesa

New Member
I was wondering if anybody has upgraded the front light on their Yukon? I measured the power goin to the stock light and it is providing 50 VDC at 24 mA (or 1.2 Watts). I see that a number of the more robust lights out on the market can demand up to 7.5 watts of power. I am a bit concerned that pulling that amount of power through the controller may damage whatever component controls that output. I really want to keep the control through the panel working and use the main battery as the power source, therefore, I have ruled out externally powered units. I was just curious if anyone had accomplished this upgrade.
I’m about to upgrade both front and back. The light I have ordered is 3W on the front and 2W on the back. This going on my 2019 Yukon 750. I’m going to remove the stock lights and connect the new ones on the same existing line. The next thing I want are turn signals
 

mbouck

Member
You should talk to VoltBike and ask them what the headlight output is rated for (volts and maximum amps). I know for Bafang most of the controllers have 6V @ 500mA outputs. If you're saying you're measuring 50V for the headlight then they either have some additional circuity incorporated or are perhaps using an alternate motor controller. Either way, you need to figure out the current rating and then make sure the light you want to run is within that rating or you risk blowing-out the lighting circuit. If you know the controller's output voltage and the watts of the headlight you can get to the amps required trivially by using the appropriate calculation. Worst case the light you want to run exceeds the current rating of the feed in which case you can still run it provided you insert a bit of additional circuitry to handle the increased load.
 

NevadaRocks

New Member
Thank you mbouck for your data. I finally put on a Spaninga double led light rated at 60 Lux which is pretty decent for most biking situations. It pulls 3.2 watts and so far has not created any issues. Now that the days are getting a bit shorter, I have finally had a chance to use it for extended periods of time. I did not change the rear light as it seems to be sufficiently bright to be seen. So, the total wattage with the upgraded front light is probably real close to your 5 watt number.