what type should I buy?

Frank Baker

New Member
I am planning to buy a fat bike that can help me ride in winter. But when I researched on it I found it to be a little expensive than the other types. Why is it so?
Can I ride other type bikes in winter also?
 

Ravi Kempaiah

Well-Known Member
I am planning to buy a fat bike that can help me ride in winter. But when I researched on it I found it to be a little expensive than the other types. Why is it so?
Can I ride other type bikes in winter also?
Fat bikes are popular because they provide traction in snow.
Any plus size tire bike or AWD bike should do equally well (may be not in deep snow) but they do pretty well. I myself ride with winter tires on a regular E-bike and it does well on roads. I don't ride when there is too much snow or black ice and I have not had any accident.

What will be your main usage of the bike?
What's terrain like where you ride?
What's your budget and fitness level?

all of these play into picking the right bike for you.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
Are you looking for a 2WD fat tire, mid-drive or hub, with or without throttle?

I ride a 4" fat tire rear hub 750w/80nm TQ Radrover ebike all year; but, don't ride in snow/icy conditions. I mostly work commute and studded tires might wear down very quickly at +75 miles per week on paved roads. Radrovers come in pretty cheap at under $1800 and you can upgrade with aftermarket studded winter tires in the 4" to 4.8" range for around $120-$220.

I do ride the sandy trails in the spring/summer and fat tires do an excellent job floating on top compared to digging in with thinner tires when the hot loose sand gets 3-6 inches deep. Having full 750w of instant throttle power available to keep your momentum can be the difference of powering through deep spots or dismounting and pushing your ebike for a while.
 

Frank Baker

New Member
Fat bikes are popular because they provide traction in snow.
Any plus size tire bike or AWD bike should do equally well (may be not in deep snow) but they do pretty well. I myself ride with winter tires on a regular E-bike and it does well on roads. I don't ride when there is too much snow or black ice and I have not had any accident.

What will be your main usage of the bike?
What's terrain like where you ride?
What's your budget and fitness level?

all of these play into picking the right bike for you.
The main usage of the bike will be to commute daily to my office which is around 10 miles from my home.
We are in the somewhat hilly area. The roads are slightly inclined here.
My budget is not much but average.
 

Frank Baker

New Member
T
Are you looking for a 2WD fat tire, mid-drive or hub, with or without throttle?

I ride a 4" fat tire rear hub 750w/80nm TQ Radrover ebike all year; but, don't ride in snow/icy conditions. I mostly work commute and studded tires might wear down very quickly at +75 miles per week on paved roads. Radrovers come in pretty cheap at under $1800 and you can upgrade with aftermarket studded winter tires in the 4" to 4.8" range for around $120-$220.

I do ride the sandy trails in the spring/summer and fat tires do an excellent job floating on top compared to digging in with thinner tires when the hot loose sand gets 3-6 inches deep. Having full 750w of instant throttle power available to keep your momentum can be the difference of powering through deep spots or dismounting and pushing your ebike for a while.
Thanks for the information. Will think about it.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
If you are staying on pavement, I'd say 2.1" tires will do most of what you want. When there is ice on the ground, only studded tires can deal with that and those will not last very long for a commuter. Plus some people report fat tires are difficult to get off the rim when you have a flat. Depends on whether you have a support person to take you home or to the bike shop, including wreckers, when trouble occurs.
Fat tires are fashionable, so much so that the 4th e-bike I've seen here was a replacement for a fat tire bike (pedego) that was stolen.
Fat tires do help bikes without a suspension cope with higher speeds, say over 12 mph.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Mine is a DIY conversion of a cheap Walmart clearance fatbike, but it's just like a Radrover with similar 750W motor in the rear. I put on better, lighter tires, and being DIY it has no speed restrictions. I added a front derailleur to facilitate pedaling unpowered, one of the few fatbikes with 21 speeds. I once had two hub motors for 2WD, but re-discovered that snow sucks. I only have the rear wheel powered now. It's 62 pounds, just about what it weighed as a non powered bike. There was a lot of steel bits in it originally, The frame is steel and all that remains of its Walmart heritage.

A fatbike would need fenders for rain/snow. The knobby tires will toss it in your face and down your back. Otherwise, a fatbike probably makes a nice commuter. They usually have enough power. Comfy, visible, big and fast. I think snow sucks and commuters have to deal with ice under the snow, That means studded tires in my opinion. If you have that, I think a mountain bike/hybrid style will work just as well and is more versatile as an everyday bike and less attention grabbing to thieves.

I should add that I ride for recreation, mostly on paved paths although there's many loops with grass and gravel. A lighter bike makes more sense for me when I'm just cruising, I only use m fatbike about 5% of my rides,
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
...
A fatbike would need fenders for rain/snow. The knobby tires will toss it in your face and down your back. ...
Where I live there are extensive winter trails, many of which are now open to fat biking. In addition some hardy souls are opening more fatbike-specific trails. I've never seen a fat bike here equipped with fenders. General consensus seems to be that snow will get trapped in the fender until the wheels won't turn anymore.

Obligatory fat biking video (notice there are no fenders in use):

 
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33red

Member
You should stay away from any fatbike to commute. Get a used bike it might be an hybrid with 35 or 38 mm studded tires. If you like it buy a similar one with an assist. Winter commutes are slow here in Montreal, Quebec. 10 miles is about the longer distance. Let s say in summer it takes you 40 min. it will be around 60 in winter. You need 2 studded tires and some like about 2 in others prefer 35 or 38 mm. To survive i use sidewalks and i ride against trafic, it is a jungle and your survival is in your hands. Avoiding traffic hours is a good idea.
 

mrgold35

Well-Known Member
I've been work commuting 2 1/2 years all year on my two Radrover 4" fat tire bike with over 7000 miles total. The only two changes I made was upgrading the tires to something street/high speed friendly (Vee8 120 tpi) and adding Spyke TRP brakes. Very comfy ride at 18-25 mph and I can take detour and hit the trails on the way home. Not the tool, it how you use it.