Will the popularity of tuning kill eBikes?

Once again, this forum performs as admirably as a self-righting boat.

I doubt it will surprise anyone if I throw out the possibility that "someone" with such animus isn't likely to be completely new to our forum.
 

Johnny

Active Member
No one is advocating anything here.

You are venting here under a fake account and I don't think that is ok and you don't deserve a proper reply for your post. I guess the best thing to do is to stop feeding this troll.

Just like the other forum members my opinion is that you suck.
 
I occasionally hear a very similar argument regarding fast or modified cars being involved with the motor sports industry all my life. Some people just don’t get the desire for modifications and improvements no matter the explanation. All my cars are modified with ridiculous horsepower and performance and yet I never get speeding tickets or been in an accident. Just because I have it, doesn’t mean I’m going to use it irresponsibly. You can pretty much bank on Ebikes getting more and more powerful and faster as well. Customers will want it and manufacturers will provide it.
 

Ken M

Well-Known Member
....the main event that started the ball rolling was when the bicycle industry was able to get Congress to pass a law amending the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s (CPSC) definition of a “bicycle” to include “low speed electric bicycles” (which implies they are equivalent status by federal regulation) which is defined as a “two- or three-wheeled vehicle with fully operable pedals and an electric motor of less than 750 watts (1 h.p.), whose maximum speed on a paved level surface, when powered solely by such a motor while ridden by an operator who weighs 170 pounds, is less than 20 mph.”

As pointed out above, the CPSC’s definition of an electric bike centers around a 20 mph limit, with the caveat that this 20 mph must not be exceeded if the electric bike is solely powered by its motor. Accordingly, this definition permits an electric bike which is powered by its rider (with the possible assistance of a motor, making the electric bike what some call a “pedelec”) to travel faster than 20 mph. The distinction is key to a correct interpretation of the CPSC’s definition.
 
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J.R.

Well-Known Member
With so many companies offering ebikes outside legal regulations, we can count on less access to cycling infrastructure.

Comparing ebikes to automobiles and motorcycles is a losing proposition. We've spent years fighting regulations that told us our bikes were motor-cycles, and now we are making the comparison. Most cycling infrastructure is designed for speeds up to 15 mph and communities aren't willing to spend money on speed enforcement. Personally I'd rather spend the money on more miles of paths, trails and separated bike lanes. Either way, if a community is asked to pay for the policing of cycling infrastructure, they'd very likely just choose to ban us all.

Cyclists are a minority and ebikers are a minority within that minority. We don't have the political clout to demand anything. I've been involved in the fight for access and it's an uphill battle. We aren't getting any assist from the high power ebike segment.
 
I think the comparison to cars is valid in this argument. Virtually every car sold today can exceed posted limits yet they are sold and allowed on the streets. There are no government regulations on power or speed limits for cars and I would oppose that if it were tried. The rules generally apply to how they are operated and I believe this is the proper way to address bikes and Ebikes as well. Does it matter if I’m riding my class 3 in an area restricted to class 1 if riding responsibly at posted speeds? I don’t think so. To me, the issue is always the human, not the machine.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
I think the comparison to cars is valid in this argument. Virtually every car sold today can exceed posted limits yet they are sold and allowed on the streets. There are no government regulations on power or speed limits for cars and I would oppose that if it were tried. The rules generally apply to how they are operated and I believe this is the proper way to address bikes and Ebikes as well. Does it matter if I’m riding my class 3 in an area restricted to class 1 if riding responsibly at posted speeds? I don’t think so. To me, the issue is always the human, not the machine.
It's really not a valid comparison. Automobile infrastructure is designed for much greater speeds, is policed with serious consequences for breaking the law and autos are designed with safety features to handle a problem.

I don't want DOT standards of safety equipment. Although I have a motorcycle license, most don't and most don't want to have to prove riding proficiency. I taught motorcycle safety for a decade and can tell you many fail. If you want the same privileges as a driver of an automobile, there's going to be a big cost. License, registration, insurance, policing and all the DOT safety equipment. There won't be the same level of enjoyment and the public won't allow you to go any faster.