1st rear wheel puncture

Papparay

Member
I was unfortunate to have a puncture yesterday on my fairly new NCM Moscow + whilst cycling along a canal towpath. I thought no problem as I carrying a spare inner tube, tools and a repair kit.
Snag number one! I could not remove the rear wheel, it was jammed on tight. Another cyclist came to my aid and it still wouldn't budge. So I removed the tube with the wheel on to fix the puncture. Snag number two, I couldn't hear the leak. Water needed! And even though I had a canal full of the stuff at the side of me, I didn't fancy dunking the whole bike into it. Luckily a little old lady spotted my plight and brought me a tub of water out from her cottage. 2 punctures found and repaired and tyre put back on.
Snag number 3. I should have loosened the display and turned it so it didn't get scratched (as someone previously advised).
And what have I gained from this experience : If your bike is new, make sure you can remove the wheels before setting off on a long ride. It took a clout with a mallet to remove mine once I got back home IMG_20200824_111558.jpg(1st time removal). Secondly make sure you cover the handlebars with something before turning the bike over, or loosen the display. Thirdly make sure you have all the tools to fix whatever the problem is. And lastly check your google maps to ensure you go the correct way back home. I added an extra 10 miles by going the wrong way.
Happy Days 🚲🥴
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I always enjoy humor (humour;)) injected into stories like this.

The rides I remember most are ones where something goes wrong.

Good anecdote!
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
I was unfortunate to have a puncture yesterday on my fairly new NCM Moscow + whilst cycling along a canal towpath. I thought no problem as I carrying a spare inner tube, tools and a repair kit.
Snag number one! I could not remove the rear wheel, it was jammed on tight. Another cyclist came to my aid and it still wouldn't budge. So I removed the tube with the wheel on to fix the puncture. Snag number two, I couldn't hear the leak. Water needed! And even though I had a canal full of the stuff at the side of me, I didn't fancy dunking the whole bike into it. Luckily a little old lady spotted my plight and brought me a tub of water out from her cottage. 2 punctures found and repaired and tyre put back on.
Snag number 3. I should have loosened the display and turned it so it didn't get scratched (as someone previously advised).
And what have I gained from this experience : If your bike is new, make sure you can remove the wheels before setting off on a long ride. It took a clout with a mallet to remove mine once I got back home View attachment 63456(1st time removal). Secondly make sure you cover the handlebars with something before turning the bike over, or loosen the display. Thirdly make sure you have all the tools to fix whatever the problem is. And lastly check your google maps to ensure you go the correct way back home. I added an extra 10 miles by going the wrong way.
Happy Days 🚲🥴
As you've suggested, I to am a proponent of practicing fixing the inevitable flat at home, rather than on the trail.

Others have reported good results with the Handlebar Jack to help with turning a bike upside down without damaging accessories.
 

Brighamdoc

New Member
Ugggg
I know your pain!
Yesterday I biked on a rough path near the bird refuge near me
Both front and back tires attacked by Goat Head sticker weeds
Nice 6 mile walk home
 

Papparay

Member
As you've suggested, I to am a proponent of practicing fixing the inevitable flat at home, rather than on the trail.

Others have reported good results with the Handlebar Jack to help with turning a bike upside down without damaging accessories.
I didn’t know there were such a thing as handle bar jacks! though I doubt I'd have had enough room in my tiny tool bag to carry them.
 

Papparay

Member
Ugggg
I know your pain!
Yesterday I biked on a rough path near the bird refuge near me
Both front and back tires attacked by Goat Head sticker weeds
Nice 6 mile walk home
Wow.. Goat head sticker weeds!! Sounds pretty deadly. Hope you didn't get too many blisters with that long walk home. 👣
 

RJC

Active Member
I was unfortunate to have a puncture yesterday on my fairly new NCM Moscow + whilst cycling along a canal towpath. I thought no problem as I carrying a spare inner tube, tools and a repair kit.
Snag number one! I could not remove the rear wheel, it was jammed on tight. Another cyclist came to my aid and it still wouldn't budge. So I removed the tube with the wheel on to fix the puncture. Snag number two, I couldn't hear the leak. Water needed! And even though I had a canal full of the stuff at the side of me, I didn't fancy dunking the whole bike into it. Luckily a little old lady spotted my plight and brought me a tub of water out from her cottage. 2 punctures found and repaired and tyre put back on.
Snag number 3. I should have loosened the display and turned it so it didn't get scratched (as someone previously advised).
And what have I gained from this experience : If your bike is new, make sure you can remove the wheels before setting off on a long ride. It took a clout with a mallet to remove mine once I got back home View attachment 63456(1st time removal). Secondly make sure you cover the handlebars with something before turning the bike over, or loosen the display. Thirdly make sure you have all the tools to fix whatever the problem is. And lastly check your google maps to ensure you go the correct way back home. I added an extra 10 miles by going the wrong way.
Happy Days 🚲🥴
I found a couple of 1 inch wooden blocks under the handle bar grips was enough to clear the display from touching the ground when at home.. I guess you could use a couple of thick dead branches if any nearby when off road.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
I didn’t know there were such a thing as handle bar jacks! though I doubt I'd have had enough room in my tiny tool bag to carry them.
I haven't used them but others report that they are light and fold into a small volume though they probably wouldn't fit a saddle bag.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I haven't used them but others report that they are light and fold into a small volume though they probably wouldn't fit a saddle bag.

they would easily fit in saddle bag. they end of folding up to about the size of an empty toilet paper roll
 
For anyone with difficulty removing hub motors, I would also recommend spinning the axle a little. Sometimes, they can rotate inside the dropouts, making it seem like the wheel is glued to the bike. Technically, they aren't supposed to spin at all inside the dropouts, but I've found on several bikes that you might get a tiny bit of rotation.
 

KuRi

Active Member
I have neved turned the bike upside down for tubes repair... :D

Anyway after 1 year of punctures I made my wheels tubeless, and no more punctures since then!!! 4000+km on my bike (2000+ with tubeless).

I really recommend turning your wheels into tubeless... they are great!
 
I replaced the standard grips with Ergon GP3 style grips and they keep the display clear of the ground on a flat surface when upside down. Either that or use the handlebar jacks, two bits of timber or a pair of shoes under your grips to avoid damage.

I find a 10mm open spanner invaluable in your toolkit to just turn the axle slightly to free it when removing the rear wheel.

My personal preference is also to remove the brake caliper and tuck it out of the way before removing the wheel. It's a lot easier to line up the caliper on the rotor afterwards when the wheel is back in than to try and slide the rotor back in between the pads - I find that the rotor bends (slightly) too easily with the weight of the hub motor if you're not careful.
 

Papparay

Member
I have neved turned the bike upside down for tubes repair... :D

Anyway after 1 year of punctures I made my wheels tubeless, and no more punctures since then!!! 4000+km on my bike (2000+ with tubeless).

I really recommend turning your wheels into tubeless... they are great!
I was planning to fit a new tube, which would have required turning the bike over! But I like the idea of going tubeless... Thanks
 

KuRi

Active Member
I was planning to fit a new tube, which would have required turning the bike over! But I like the idea of going tubeless... Thanks
Once I had a puncture on the rear wheel while riding with a friend and we managed to remove the wheel and change the tube without turning the bike over, but we were 2 people, so he was with the bike while I changed the tube :D

To go tubuless you need a 20-21mm tape, new tubeless valves, new tubeless tires and some sealant. It is an easy procedure if you have done it before, but can be a pain if never done ;)
 

Papparay

Member
I have neved turned the bike upside down for tubes repair... :D

Anyway after 1 year of punctures I made my wheels tubeless, and no more punctures since then!!! 4000+km on my bike (2000+ with tubeless).

I really recommend turning your wheels into tubeless... they are great!
I was thinking of fitting puncture proof tyre strips! Has anyone tried them?
 

KuRi

Active Member
Never tried them... but another cool thing you can do is carry a small bottle of sealant liquid for inner tubes and a valve remover and just fill the tube whenever you have a puncture. This way you can go back to home and there replace the tube easily.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
I was thinking of fitting puncture proof tyre strips! Has anyone tried them?
I've used tire liners/thorn strips for years in our mech bikes with excellent results. When we got our new ebikes ~16 months ago I just wanted to ride so I put off installing thorn strips. After 3 flats in the first few months I finally installed them. No flats since. It's been well over 1,000 miles now. BTW - our mech bikes haven't had a flat in ~2 years, a combined 4,000 miles.

I use THESE. I unroll them and let them 'relax' overnight before installing. Otherwise it's like working with a spring to put them in the tire.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
This recent article by Outside magazine speaks to the benefits of tubeless tires and how tubeless rated rims differ from conventional rims. Basically rims rated for tubeless use have a bead that is a special shape, designed to lock in the matching bead on a tubeless rated tire. This is all intended to prevent the bead from letting go under even the most severe use.

In years past it was common to convert conventional rims to tubeless use with special rim tape, valve stems, and sealant. My sons did this when they raced cross country MTBs is school. They were constantly dealing with blowouts and other issues. Newer tubeless rated systems are much better. My sons swear by them now.
 
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Papparay

Member
I've used tire liners/thorn strips for years in our mech bikes with excellent results. When we got our new ebikes ~16 months ago I just wanted to ride so I put off installing thorn strips. After 3 flats in the first few months I finally installed them. No flats since. It's been well over 1,000 miles now. BTW - our mech bikes haven't had a flat in ~2 years, a combined 4,000 miles.

I use THESE. I unroll them and let them 'relax' overnight before installing. Otherwise it's like working with a spring to put them in the tire.
Thank you buddy! You've convinced me to give these thorn strips a go.
Thanks.
 

lanlavina

New Member
I was unfortunate to have a puncture yesterday on my fairly new NCM Moscow + whilst cycling along a canal towpath. I thought no problem as I carrying a spare inner tube, tools and a repair kit.
Snag number one! I could not remove the rear wheel, it was jammed on tight. Another cyclist came to my aid and it still wouldn't budge. So I removed the tube with the wheel on to fix the puncture. Snag number two, I couldn't hear the leak. Water needed! And even though I had a canal full of the stuff at the side of me, I didn't fancy dunking the whole bike into it. Luckily a little old lady spotted my plight and brought me a tub of water out from her cottage. 2 punctures found and repaired and tyre put back on.
Snag number 3. I should have loosened the display and turned it so it didn't get scratched (as someone previously advised).
And what have I gained from this experience : If your bike is new, make sure you can remove the wheels before setting off on a long ride. It took a clout with a mallet to remove mine once I got back home View attachment 63456(1st time removal). Secondly make sure you cover the handlebars with something before turning the bike over, or loosen the display. Thirdly make sure you have all the tools to fix whatever the problem is. And lastly check your google maps to ensure you go the correct way back home. I added an extra 10 miles by going the wrong way.
Happy Days 🚲🥴
I use the 2 styro block that comes with the bike. I think it was the ones holding the wheels...