2019 Pedego Ridge Rider 20mph limiter - easiest hack around this?

iamjcl

Member
In considering various E-bikes and having some knee issues, the Ridge Rider is an appealing choice, with both torque and cadence PAS, in addition to throttle only.

Apparently these bikes had a 25mph limit for PAS or throttle, but now (late 2018 and I assume 2019 forward) have a 20mph limit.

There are "hacks" or programming sequences all over the net for other brands, systems, motors etc..., but wondered about the possibility on the Ridge Rider?

I know the motor / controller appears to be by Dapu - surely there must be a way to restore an off-road 25mph speed?

With such a powerful motor and solid battery, 20mph seems a bit restrictive.

Thanks for any insight.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I believe Ridge Rider comes with this typical Pedego display with preset top speed.

Watch this video.

 

iamjcl

Member
I believe Ridge Rider comes with this typical Pedego display with preset top speed.

Watch this video.

Thanks - So you're saying the newer units can definitely still be set to higher than 20 (as the video shows)? I was under the impression this wasn't possible anymore.
 

mako

Member
I know if you take the controller off a newer Pedego and replace it with the older controller then you will be able to increase the mph setting successfully. I also heard that you can plug up to the new controller, via the USB connection, with an IPAD and do the same. YMMV
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Thanks - So you're saying the newer units can definitely still be set to higher than 20 (as the video shows)? I was under the impression this wasn't possible anymore.
I have no way to confirm if that's the case. I do not work for Pedego so I am not sure..
But yea, the Ridge Rider comes with 864W max motor, so it is indeed, a bit restrictive.
 

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
If the 20mph limit is a deal breaker for you, why not get a different bike? I wouldn't not want to try to hack such an expensive item. Or, you may try the bike and discover that 20mph is all you need? My bike has one of the older controllers that goes faster (up to 25mph). Do I go that fast? Um, no, I don't. I only exceed 20mph when going downhill and that, of course, is unassisted.

Happy ebike shopping!
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
In October of 2018, Pedego sent me a new (at the time) Dapu controller to replace a defective unit on my Platinum Interceptor. The new controller came from Pedego with the speed set at 20 MPH. When I questioned tech support, I was told, with a wink and a nod, to use the display menu to set the top speed to 25 MPH. Now the bike is back to a 25 MPH top speed. I was told the factory 20 MPH setting was just to satisfy some regulation.

I don't know if this fix is the same for the controller on the Ridge Rider though.
 

iamjcl

Member
I believe the Pedego Ridge Rider is powered by Dapu M155 CH motor & most likley Dapu JK3 speed controller, which is designed to go 28mph (45km/h).

To unlock the top speed, unless Pedego changed the connectors, you can just use Dapu display.
http://www.dapumotors.com/control-panels/
Thank you for this info.

I'm not sure I follow you here though - do you mean connect another display unit to the pedego bike wiring and program it that way? I wonder if the firmware changes that have the limit resides in the controller or the display unit?

If I understand correctly, the newer pedego display will still let you put in a number up to 25, but the speed controller still will limit motor use to 20.

I really don't know much about this, but rode a "new" Pedego ridge rider recently (but dealer has had it since last summer) and it did go over 20mph, but think it was an "old" bike with the old firmware probably.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Thank you for this info.

I'm not sure I follow you here though - do you mean connect another display unit to the pedego bike wiring and program it that way? I wonder if the firmware changes that have the limit resides in the controller or the display unit?

If I understand correctly, the newer pedego display will still let you put in a number up to 25, but the speed controller still will limit motor use to 20.

I really don't know much about this, but rode a "new" Pedego ridge rider recently (but dealer has had it since last summer) and it did go over 20mph, but think it was an "old" bike with the old firmware probably.
Yeah it is typically the display that is restricting the top speed.
I can't speak for the Pedego specifically, but generally, that's how it works.

For example, my Juiced CrossCurrent Air came with the 20mph top speed. (Yes, I know Juiced is known for making fast bikes, but they did make 20mph bikes like early CrossCurrent, U500, etc.)

Anyways, Juiced used to have LED display with "eco, 1, 2, 3" modes. Limited to 20mph.
And they came up with "eco, 1, 2, 3, S" modes. "S" stands for sport and went up to 28mph instead of 20mph.

So I changed that display to raise the limit to 28mph. Did I change the speed controller? No, because it's the display that's governing the speed.

Now, Juiced has this LCD digital display instead of LED one. The LCD display will let you set the top speed up to 99mph, however Tora said that it will only go almost 35mph or so since the motor will meet the structural limitation.

As I said, I am not sure about Dapu, but that's how Bafang hub drive motors work.

If I were you, I would double check with Dapu, and don't even bother asking Pedego because they're well known for being against their customers modifying or interchanging parts with other bikes.
 

iamjcl

Member
Yeah it is typically the display that is restricting the top speed.
I can't speak for the Pedego specifically, but generally, that's how it works.

For example, my Juiced CrossCurrent Air came with the 20mph top speed. (Yes, I know Juiced is known for making fast bikes, but they did make 20mph bikes like early CrossCurrent, U500, etc.)

Anyways, Juiced used to have LED display with "eco, 1, 2, 3" modes. Limited to 20mph.
And they came up with "eco, 1, 2, 3, S" modes. "S" stands for sport and went up to 28mph instead of 20mph.

So I changed that display to raise the limit to 28mph. Did I change the speed controller? No, because it's the display that's governing the speed.

Now, Juiced has this LCD digital display instead of LED one. The LCD display will let you set the top speed up to 99mph, however Tora said that it will only go almost 35mph or so since the motor will meet the structural limitation.

As I said, I am not sure about Dapu, but that's how Bafang hub drive motors work.

If I were you, I would double check with Dapu, and don't even bother asking Pedego because they're well known for being against their customers modifying or interchanging parts with other bikes.
I hear you - Pedego isn't about anything but stock, mainstream use.

There probably aren't too many Pedego users who modify anything either, if I had to guess, since the target market generally just buys it and uses it.

I"ve always been into modifying things when beneficial, or at least knowing how it all goes together, so in that regard I'm not a typical Pedego customer, but I do like the general quality of this bike, but think it is overpriced and probably ready for a model refresh since its been around 4 years or so in its current form. Resale probably isn't good either, being as many of their customers probably would prefer to buy new.

Batteries are $1K, which is a little steep too, in my opinion.

May just go with something like a RadRover to get into it, and then keep it around as a beater if I decide to get something more sophisticated - looks like a fun and reasonably priced bike.
 

ebikemom

Administrator
Staff member
Yeah, I don't think most folks who spend a lot on something want to mess with it unless they are experts. And my local bike tech said that the Pedego components are terrific, so no need to upgrade anything.
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
I hear you - Pedego isn't about anything but stock, mainstream use.

There probably aren't too many Pedego users who modify anything either, if I had to guess, since the target market generally just buys it and uses it.

I"ve always been into modifying things when beneficial, or at least knowing how it all goes together, so in that regard I'm not a typical Pedego customer, but I do like the general quality of this bike, but think it is overpriced and probably ready for a model refresh since its been around 4 years or so in its current form. Resale probably isn't good either, being as many of their customers probably would prefer to buy new.

Batteries are $1K, which is a little steep too, in my opinion.

May just go with something like a RadRover to get into it, and then keep it around as a beater if I decide to get something more sophisticated - looks like a fun and reasonably priced bike.
yeah it sucks how Pedego doesn't support that, because modifying bikes is the part of having fun with your bike.

Especially if you're coming from MTB background, I remember myself getting a new crank, fork, and upgrading brakes and whatnot.

If you're looking for a Rad Rover, it's probably not a bad idea.
Bolton makes a 35A controller. https://boltonebikes.com/collections/motor-controllers-and-displays/products/radrover-upgrade-kit
That's 1680W max if use 48V battery.

The difference is quite significant... here's the review of this kit. https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/radrover-controller-display-upgrade-kit.27089/
 

Timpo

Well-Known Member
Yeah, I don't think most folks who spend a lot on something want to mess with it unless they are experts. And my local bike tech said that the Pedego components are terrific, so no need to upgrade anything.
To each their own.

My Juiced has been upgraded.. quite a bit. Speed Controller, display, fork, pedals, seat, tires and all the other things normal bikes guys would do.

I know you said it's expensive, which is true, but in the motorcycle community for example, it was almost harder to find a stock bike than modified bike.
Ebikes are a lot more simpler and so much easier to modify... just like bicycles. Honestly, modifying your bike is part of fun.

Have you ever walked into the bike shop with lots of modification parts and/or looking at bike magazine trying to think about your next project?

That said, even though bicycles/ebikes are simple to work on relative to motorcycles.. it can be intimidating if you have never done it.
I had to learn how to do it in my childhood and yeah, I remember messing up a lot of stuff. (everyone starts somewhere, lol)

Nowadays there are people on YouTube showing step by step how to do stuff on your bike so it's a lot easier.
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
I hear you - Pedego isn't about anything but stock, mainstream use.

There probably aren't too many Pedego users who modify anything either, if I had to guess, since the target market generally just buys it and uses it.

Batteries are $1K, which is a little steep too, in my opinion.
I've modified many things on my Pedego including handlebars, rear cassette, stem & stem riser, seat, seatpost, tires & tubes and the battery rack. None of this has any affect on the warranty. Motor or wiring alterations however would void the warranty. The only wiring modification I plan to make is to add a second battery switch. Until the warranty expires, I'll just swap batteries manually on long rides.

Pedego sends warranty repair parts directly to me without having to see a dealer. I ordered a spare 48V 15 AH battery directly from them and paid $719.

There aren't many motor, controller or display upgrades available for the Dapu components but other than that, I don't see Pedego being overly restrictive on modifications.
 

iamjcl

Member
I've modified many things on my Pedego including handlebars, rear cassette, stem & stem riser, seat, seatpost, tires & tubes and the battery rack. None of this has any affect on the warranty. Motor or wiring alterations however would void the warranty. The only wiring modification I plan to make is to add a second battery switch. Until the warranty expires, I'll just swap batteries manually on long rides.

Pedego sends warranty repair parts directly to me without having to see a dealer. I ordered a spare 48V 15 AH battery directly from them and paid $719.

There aren't many motor, controller or display upgrades available for the Dapu components but other than that, I don't see Pedego being overly restrictive on modifications.
Thanks for that - Do you have the Ridge Rider ? I'm curious about your thoughts on the torque sensor. When I rode it yesterday, I thought it was a very coarse application of power - like an on / off switch, no matter what PAS level I chose. I realize that is the characteristic of cadence sensors and many bikes that only have that respond that way (and that isn't necessarily a bad thing I guess) but I rode a Yamaha mid drive MTB a week or so ago and it was so smooth and transparent that I just felt like superman pedaling - motor power came and went without really noticing it. Did not get that impression at all on the Ridge Rider, but maybe the torque sensor was either broken or the one they use on that bike is a very basic one. Still a very nice bike though, to be sure.
 

iamjcl

Member
yeah it sucks how Pedego doesn't support that, because modifying bikes is the part of having fun with your bike.

Especially if you're coming from MTB background, I remember myself getting a new crank, fork, and upgrading brakes and whatnot.

If you're looking for a Rad Rover, it's probably not a bad idea.
Bolton makes a 35A controller. https://boltonebikes.com/collections/motor-controllers-and-displays/products/radrover-upgrade-kit
That's 1680W max if use 48V battery.

The difference is quite significant... here's the review of this kit. https://electricbikereview.com/forums/threads/radrover-controller-display-upgrade-kit.27089/
Thanks! I did see this - very simple mod, and one that provides some custom programming options (configure max amp draw, for example) that are nice.

Comparing Rover to Juiced Ripcurrent S, you could get RR, kit you mention and a 2nd battery and still be in it for less $. Sure, still no hydro brakes and non torque sensor (and I'm not so sure how well that one works), but otherwise pretty close. Also like how the RR has mounts for a front rack on the steering tube - something I might possibly use -vs- a rear rack.

Rad Rover looks like it's a solid offering at that price, and can be modded simply since there are quite a few of them out there. I wonder about adding a more fluid pedal assist sensing tech to it - like a torque sensor etc..., but I guess I should post that over in the Rad section...
 

6zfshdb

Well-Known Member
Thanks for that - Do you have the Ridge Rider ? I'm curious about your thoughts on the torque sensor. When I rode it yesterday, I thought it was a very coarse application of power - like an on / off switch, no matter what PAS level I chose. I realize that is the characteristic of cadence sensors and many bikes that only have that respond that way (and that isn't necessarily a bad thing I guess) but I rode a Yamaha mid drive MTB a week or so ago and it was so smooth and transparent that I just felt like superman pedaling - motor power came and went without really noticing it. Did not get that impression at all on the Ridge Rider, but maybe the torque sensor was either broken or the one they use on that bike is a very basic one. Still a very nice bike though, to be sure.
I have the Platinum Interceptor but from the Pedego website, it appears both bikes use the same torque sensor. Yes, the sensor is a bit "coarse" as you put it. It does act almost like an on off switch when you first start out. After you get moving, the sensitivity and top speed vary depending on what PAS level you use. I've definitely seen better performance on other bikes.
 

iamjcl

Member
I have the Platinum Interceptor but from the Pedego website, it appears both bikes use the same torque sensor. Yes, the sensor is a bit "coarse" as you put it. It does act almost like an on off switch when you first start out. After you get moving, the sensitivity and top speed vary depending on what PAS level you use. I've definitely seen better performance on other bikes.
Ok thanks - that helps a lot. I didn't want to assume this was normal if in fact there was an issue with the particular bike I rode. The dealer rode it and he said it was normal, so I assumed he'd know but it's good to get clarification. Not a deal breaker, but a little disappointed. Those mid-drive bikes are really nice in this respect - there is a big difference.