2020 : Our Rides in Words, Photos & Maps

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Riveting Story …
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Story Bridge & Brisbane Central
Jen and I first crossed the Story Bridge in our Kombi back in 1972. None of the buildings in the background was there then. More significantly the bridge has been upgraded for cyclists; note the green railings on the far side. I must have crossed the Story Bridge hundreds of times on my rides through the city centre.

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The bridge's structure reminds me of my childhood Meccano constructions that were a significant part of my life before it was hijacked by the more pressing concerns of adolescence. My Christmas and birthday gifts regularly included Meccano but never sufficient to make this bridge. No adoring little sister either! Meccano advertisement 1920; Story Bridge construction 1935–1940. My parents (born 1912 and 1915) would have been the same age in 1920 as the children in the Christmas advertisement… and I have a photo of Mum dressed just that way.

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Click photos to fill screen.
The Story Bridge's thousands of flat sheets of steel are held together by countless rivets – one and a quarter million is the accepted total but I doubt that anyone has checked. And then there's the never-ending task of painting. As with almost every big steel bridge there is an urban myth that painters start at one end and when the other is reached it is time to start all over again. (It doesn't quite look like that is the case.)

Eighty years old in July. There'll be many steel cantilever bridges around the world edging towards their century, including the Jacques Cartier Bridge in Montreal on which the Story Bridge was modelled. Brisbane's bridge has more rivets.
 

Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
Another sunny, but chilly day here. I decided to ride up towards Conconully after the thermometer hit 40. Conconully is a not quite ghost town that was a former gold mining town. It has a small store, gas station, a couple bars/restaurants and a state park. It is at a higher elevation so the ride there is up. Conconully is now a fishing, hunting, ATVing place.

I did better than I thought. I stopped at the top of a big climb and looked at the time. It was later than I thought so I headed back home. I had 5 more miles to go to make it to Conconully. I didn't want to be too worn out as tonight is orchestra practice. I am last violin.

I'd had a @#$% headwind for most of the way up. On the big hill, I finally had a bit of help from the wind and did it in granny gear at the Sport level.

The cows are hatching and the history sign has not been shot up (yet), so all is good.


The maternity ward:
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Down the bank behind this sign looks to be a dumping spot.
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The Basin:
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Cowlitz

Well-Known Member
I'm fascinated with the Cascades. Pity I can only watch them on the Google Maps and pictures. Remind me Cowlitz: What e-bike are you riding?
I ride a nerdy, but comfortable Gazelle Arroyo. The North Cascades look a lot like the Alps to me, but without roads and resorts. I can only say this from looking at pictures and watching Rick Steves shows though.

We have Leavenworth, dur Bavarian Willage for a real tourist experience, It is a couple hour drive for me though, and parking is hard to come by in Leavenworth.
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Home from the sea — prawn trawler …
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Moreton Bay seen from Shorncliffe Parade, Brisbane.
Early morning is a good time to start a ride up the coast. Tuesday's ride began near Brisbane Airport and, after following the Moreton Bay Cycleway down to the sea at Nudgee Beach (a common turnaround for rides starting in the western suburbs), took me through the wetlands which, for once, were genuinely wet before depositing me on the clifftop from which I took this photo.

The prawn trawler was returning to its base in Cabbage Tree Creek (click for photo of trawlers). It was 7.40 am by now and, after an hour of riding I was eager to meet up with Mario the barista near Shorncliffe Pier but, I'm glad I paused for a few moments to watch the trawler with its net drying pass by.

The view is ENE with Moreton Island (click for info), one of the world's largest sand islands, on the horizon. Beyond the entrance to Moreton Bay (just left, north of the island) it is clear across the Pacific to the Panama Canal or wherever whim and fuel supply might lead you. On the horizon just in front of the trawler – forgive my the landlubber's terminology! – a container ship can be seen on its way out of Moreton Bay.

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Ride : 119 km : Map (photo at 23 km)
 

Readytoride

Well-Known Member
David - Thanks for supplying the links. Reading the history of places one sees, or goes to, just makes it all the more personal and interesting.

But...you gave us such a small snippet. I want to hear about the rest of the ride. :)
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Around The Raszyn Radio Tower (with three hundred watts of power!)

These are the modified lyrics to the Modern Lovers' song "Roadrunner", of which the "Twice" version I love above all other songs in the world!

Well. The sunshine didn't let me stay at home. The initial temperature was 10 C (50 F) and the final was 6 C (43 F). Winds should be milder than before. As I didn't want to experience the range anxiety, I chose my faithful steed Lovelec that time. I can ride bike lanes with this e-bike and yes I planned ride them wherever available. I made only very general route planning (go East -- what is a known location eastwards? Lesznowola. Let the Lesznowola be it).

During the ride I found out my Lovelec exhibited the long range capability again. After riding 22 km, 3/4 of the battery was still available. So I stopped navigating and went on a relaxing and exhilarating ramble.

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Bad news is: You need to go onto a short segment of dangerous Route 721. Good news is: The bike lane will be completed in some future.

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That's the Raszyn Radio Tower. The place-name "Raszyn" is historical here; the actual location is Łazy. The broadcasting centre commenced its operation in 1931. The current mast was built in 1949. Until 1962, the 335 m tall construction was the tallest in Europe. Another radio tower, completed in 1974 in Konstantynów was indeed the tallest Europe's structure but it fell down and "became the longest one"... 🤣 The Raszyn Radio Tower was important during the Cold War as it transmitted Polish Radio One on long waves and the broadcast could reach Polish communities even in North America. Nowadays, the tower is used for broadcasting digital TV and FM radio stations.


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Lesznowola. The elephant demonstrates the skill of the local stone-mason.

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A horsie in Stara Iwiczna.

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Piaseczno. As it was just an hour to the sunset, I had already known the return way would be mostly at dark. I learned to love the night rides!

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At the dusk in Wólka Kosowska, the site of an immense Chinese & Turkish wholesale warehouse area. I was just roaming in the general direction of home. I'm not that ignorant of my own neighbourhood, only the route details are not always clear to me, because many new local roads have been built there.


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Lost. That was the moment I started enjoying wandering. While I was perusing Google Maps, a landowner approached me and said: "Do you already know where you are?" -- "In general terms, yes I do" -- "Ride on! An asphalt road begins soon and then you'll even have a bike lane; you'll reach Nadarzyn in no time!" I was glad I had the Cateye Volt 1700 headlight (it was set to 600 lm here). I was taking weirdest roads and even rode a single-track in a forest at complete darkness! The CatEye lamp is very expensive but I have never regretted purchasing it.

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I thought of a 45 km trip and ended up with the 60 km one. So glad!


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Theguvna

Member
After being a passenger on the forum for over 9 weeks and reading about peoples adventures, and looking at their photos was very entertaining i can now contribute! Yesterday, after a 9 week gestation period our bikes finally arrived. I was so excited to post a picture with my bike in the foreground with some stunning landscape in the background. The weather was co-operating with a brillant blue sky albeit a tad chilly 12c and me on my new eBike with a smile so big i'm sure i scared the young children as i rode past. I had walked our entlebucher for his 5k exercise earlier, all the while thinking about which route i was going to take once i got back home and had my cup of tea. One tired dog down, our basset doesn't need the same amount of exercise so i was good to go. Did a pre ride check for tire pressure and brakes (trying to start with good habits), buckled up the helmet and i was off. I did 18 kms and stopped to enjoy the sun and take my picture when i looked at my rear rack without my trunk bag and realised i had raced off without my camera and energy bar. It was another 18 km ride home which gave me plenty of time to realise i need to start writing things down to remember. Getting old is so much fun!! So, the attached picture is from the same spot only two days prior while out walking with my wife and both dogs.
The Vedder River attracts a wide variety of animals because of the salmon runs which last about 10 months. This time of year it's what we call "chum" salmon, not very good eating for human consumption but there's always a gauntlet of fisherman the fish need to get past. We've seen Kingfishers, Turkey vultures, eagles, bobcats, coyotes, and herons. In the summer the river is very pleasant for a swim or just a long slow float on a tube.
 

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steve mercier

Well-Known Member
After being a passenger on the forum for over 9 weeks and reading about peoples adventures, and looking at their photos was very entertaining i can now contribute! Yesterday, after a 9 week gestation period our bikes finally arrived. I was so excited to post a picture with my bike in the foreground with some stunning landscape in the background. The weather was co-operating with a brillant blue sky albeit a tad chilly 12c and me on my new eBike with a smile so big i'm sure i scared the young children as i rode past. I had walked our entlebucher for his 5k exercise earlier, all the while thinking about which route i was going to take once i got back home and had my cup of tea. One tired dog down, our basset doesn't need the same amount of exercise so i was good to go. Did a pre ride check for tire pressure and brakes (trying to start with good habits), buckled up the helmet and i was off. I did 18 kms and stopped to enjoy the sun and take my picture when i looked at my rear rack without my trunk bag and realised i had raced off without my camera and energy bar. It was another 18 km ride home which gave me plenty of time to realise i need to start writing things down to remember. Getting old is so much fun!! So, the attached picture is from the same spot only two days prior while out walking with my wife and both dogs.
The Vedder River attracts a wide variety of animals because of the salmon runs which last about 10 months. This time of year it's what we call "chum" salmon, not very good eating for human consumption but there's always a gauntlet of fisherman the fish need to get past. We've seen Kingfishers, Turkey vultures, eagles, bobcats, coyotes, and herons. In the summer the river is very pleasant for a swim or just a long slow float on a tube.
My wife used to live in Yarrow when she was a young teacher in Chilliwack. We enjoyed cycling around there. I recall that we liked it along the dykes to Vye road to Huntington and down to 0 avenue , West towards Poplar , Peardonville ,Aldergrove Etc. The Sumas mountain area is very beautiful riding too. Next time bring your camera!
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
David OOPS...no I am wrong . I did have a passenger bus, which was similar to your Kombi which I erroneously thought was the same as a "Thing"! I also wanted a Schwimmwagon but was afraid of drowning in it.
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FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
David OOPS...no I am wrong . I did have a passenger bus, which was similar to your Kombi which I erroneously thought was the same as a "Thing"!
I also wanted a Schwimmwagon but was afraid of drowning in it. View attachment 46023
A local friend had a large collection of military vehicles including the Schwimmwagon and the original Thing... ;)

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David Berry

Well-Known Member
Home from the sea — the dog paddlers …
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Newport Waters, Deception Bay
After stopping for coffee at Shorncliffe, my ride north along the Moreton Bay Cycleway followed the water's edge around Bramble Bay, crossed the Ted Smout Bridge (click for photo) and brought me an hour later to the northernmost tip of the Redcliffe Peninsula.

Although the route is along bike paths and a few quiet streets, one glimpse at the 'satellite' version of Google Maps reveals that there are tens of thousands of people living here. Medium high-rise apartments are sprouting up to welcome an influx of retirees in search of an idyllic place to live. Many have found it.

The couple in this photo was heading back to a canal development across the quiet waters of Deception Bay, the very inlet that I had often explored in my small yacht in the eighties and nineties. Disconcertingly, the boat washed up on the shore beyond the canal development entrance was the same size and colour as mine. I was paying more attention to it than I was to the paddlers and it was only on looking at the photos on my computer that I realised that the plastic crate on the white canoe was holding a cargo more precious than a packed lunch and a picnic blanket…

Better than being left at home …
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Readytoride

Well-Known Member
Sigh.

That was the first thing that escaped my lips yesterday afternoon as I realized the temps were moving much higher on the thermometer than predicted, encouraging a temporary escape from the daily routine for a relaxing ride through the countryside.
The rollercoast ride of temperatures was reaching a high that begged me to come outside and enjoy because the temps for the next few days were going to be Arctic.

That was it. No discussion. One quick pill to make my arm forget any complaints, and my bike and I were off to enjoy a very quiet and peaceful cycle through the warming countryside.

It was my intention to only ride the gravel roads that afternoon, which meant more short and steep sections that would demand some higher assist and lower gears, but would also pretty much ensure I should have the planned 16 miles all to myself without a car in sight. Blissful solitude.

My plan worked flawlessly. It was just the birds, the sun, and I enjoying the spat of warmth and the gentle miles. Not even a breeze bothered to stir. Along the way Spring peeked out at me here and there through small groups of deep green bulb leaves sprouting from the dark earth, and buds swelling on the very tips of trees and bushes. It was as if everything was just holding it's breath, waiting for the final telltale spin of the planet to let loose the explosion of new growth and a kaleidoscope of awe inspiring color that was true Springtime.

But it as not yet time. The grays and browns of Winter maintained their position over the landscape, refusing to yield ground. I cycled past miles of century old stone walls warming in the sun, still wearing their warm blankets of autumn leaves and summer moss. They had infinite patience, unlike the bits of green grass at the base of the walls, their tiny thin spikes already eagerly pushing aside the dead leaves that still littered the ground from last fall. Most of the casualities of last Autumn were already halfway on their journey to be reclaimed by the soil, the entire landscape swathed in a reflective mood, musing over the certainities of the past while contemplating the uncertainties of the future.

The memories of other centuries so very long ago tend to swirl in deep eddies along these gravel roads. Memories that reach out to brush lightly across the mind as one cycles along watching the land move past at a languid pace, bits of memory nudging the past forward into view to be assured it is not forgotten by those who are lucky enough to look for it.

I stopped at a beautiful house about 5 miles enroute to visit a neighbor (everyone who lives out in the country is a neighbor if they live within 5 miles) that I had met last fall while I was hacking down the road while she was cycling up the same road on her new ebike. Of course my friend and I just had to stop and chat with her, our horses happy to chill out and nap while we all talked.

As we three concluded our impromptu chat she and I happily agreed to get together for a bike ride, and she took down my number. I hadn't heard from her since, but knew where she lived, so my visit was to get caught up. It was a quick visit and she was thrilled to touch base again. She had been out on her bike only three more times since we met, and said she had wanted to call me several times but was worried that she wasn't in good enough shape to ride with me. She said she was just too shy to make that leap of faith. I laughed and assured her with an easy wave of my hand that a casual slow jaunt down the road was my preferred method of cycling anyway, so her company would be more than welcome. It would be perfect. Once the good weather had come to stay, I promised I'd get her out for a ride. She was eager to see my bike, so we continued our conversation outside in the warm sun, enjoying ebike talk as only ebikers can do.

After our goodbyes and a last pat to her trio of endearing and very enthusiastic Labradors, I set off on the remaining part of my ride, following the gravel roads as they wound through woods, crossed streams via low water dams, and traveled the fence lines of endless pastures dotted with pampered horses wearing colorful, albeit very muddy, winter horse attire.

The rolling roads kept me busy shifting my assist and gears, and the slow pace kept my arm - still under the influence of the one pain pill - happy and without complaint. My goal at that point was to visit a riding friend's farm to see the progress of the solar panels she was having installed on her expansive stable.
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She had smartly taken advantage of the closing rebate period and was intent to go as green as possible with all her future energy needs. The panels would generate a very nice 38kW of power on an optimum day for all the farm and house needs. She was out of state at the moment, so no chance to catch up...which we will do later. The temps were already dropping, so I didn't linger except to chat briefly with the installers - who were on their second to the last panel to set in place - take a photo, then head on towards home.

The final half mile to my farm was a small stretch of paved road heading downhill. From the heights one overlooked the long stretch of the Blue Ridge mountains as they lined up north and south, a solid wall of ancient rise that predated the dinosaurs. Tired, old, and in their second fall towards the embrace of Mother Earth, they were still a sight of the immense beauty that defines our planet. And of home.

I set my bike to freewheel in delirious joy down the paved road in increasing speed until the wind whistled around my speeding frame and my grin reached from ear to ear, a delightfully childlike way to end any bike ride.

Sigh.
 
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