2020 Trek Verve +3 BRAND NEW on USA Website

Rick53

Active Member
There should be a suspension fork version coming as well!
THat's the Alliant +7 with the Bosch performance Line 28 MPH : I'm told these have the Bosch Gen4 Active Line Plus vs The Verve 2 has just teh ACTIVE LINE : More Torque and easier to peddle past 20MPH. The Alliant +7 is also $3999.00 vs $2999.00

Allows for additional battery to extend range : Glad I Waited
 
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Rick53

Active Member
Any idea when?

Any idea what the weight is? With the 500 battery what would you expect the range to be on relatively flat surfaces? Any idea when the suspension fork will be available? Thanks
They told me March-April 2020 : They told me that about The New Verve and it's here : I would expect the other Soon
 

Rob NJ

Member
The short answer in our experience is about 50 miles.

I have an Allant 9.9 with gen 4 Bosch speed motor and 625 battery. My wife has the SuperCommuter with gen 3 Bosch speed and 500 battery. We rode from St Petersburg to Dunedin and back one day a few months ago. In Florida, 14 to 16 mph, relatively flat, mostly on Eco with a bit of Tour to speed us home on the final 10 miles. The total ride was 54 miles, and she had very little juice left. I had a bit more with the 625. So I would say that a range of 50 miles on relatively flat terrain is easily expected. We are nearing about 2,000 miles on the Supercommuters (now mine is Allant). We would not think twice about energy on 30 to 40 mile ride. Would be more thoughtful on 50. Hope this helps
 

Rob NJ

Member
$1100 for a 500Wh extended range battery though is highway robbery, and this bike is not even highway legal.
I agree, which is why I do not have another battery. TBH, we rarely go over 50 miles in a day. A few years ago, I rode from NJ to Vermont over 5 days with only one battery. Longest day was 70 miles. Did about 30 miles early, then stopped for a big brunch to charge up, and did the last 40. For the way we normally ride, one battery is enough. But the cost is high for a spare, no doubt.
 
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Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
I prefer a rigid fork because it's lighter and cheaper. I see no need for a suspension fork unless I'm mountain biking. I know a lot of people here like it and like the suspension seat post, but my preferences are different.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I prefer a rigid fork because it's lighter and cheaper. I see no need for a suspension fork unless I'm mountain biking. I know a lot of people here like it and like the suspension seat post, but my preferences are different.
On road it is not needed but yesterday I rode a long stony trail at full speed which would put you in hospital for a kidney transplant without suspension so the tradeoff is more route options vs less weight. Different horses for different courses.
 

opimax

Well-Known Member
I thought they did not have any for the newest Bosch? I don’t follow closely, the last I read was not working, not really sure...