2020 Verve+ 2 As Daily Commuter?

sfdint51

New Member
Hi All,
I was hoping you might provide your thoughts on using a 2020 Trek Verve+ 2 as a daily commuter. I am 5’ 11” and weigh 150lbs. I intend to put about 25 miles per day on this bike, with a few significant hills on my route. And I intend to ride it rain or shine. I like the Verve as it seems to have the things important for commuting, but hopefully keeps me from overbuying. Thank you for your input!
I test rode one yesterday. The bike is so comfortable and unintimidating. I found it plenty of powerful for commuting if you don't need a snappy acceleration. I tried it on a steep hill in town. I powered up to Turbo and geared down to the lowest gear and maintained 8mph all the way up. I ended up buying a Powerfly 5 because I like to do some heavier duty trail riding, but the Verve+2 is an elegant, simple, attractive bike.
 

Madison Dan

New Member
I've been using a Verve+ as a daily commuter for 6 months. My commute is 9 miles round trip. People will say the bike is under-powered compared to some options and while I know what they mean, I like it the way it is. For me, it's a bike that helps me sometimes rather than a bike that does most of the work for me. I use Eco mode most of the time, moving up to Tour mode for hills and harsh headwinds. I save Turbo for the steepest hills or for when I'm in a hurry.

The benefits are that the bike is lighter than a lot of alternatives and I can almost never hear the motor over the wind noise in my ears. I just feel like an extra strong cyclist.
 

rochrunner

Member
My wife certainly loves her '19 Verve+ Lowstep and can get 70-80 miles in Eco mode on a full charge. Of course, she runs about 115 lbs and our terrain is almost totally flat (she sticks mainly to rail-trails). She is also out to maintain her fitness and runs at low boost or even with the motor off on the easier stretches.
 

Mister orange

New Member
I have been doing a 20 mile round trip commute with a few steep hills for the last year on a trek verve from 2019. It’s been more than enough for me. I used to do the commute ona regular bike for years, but I was getting old and although I could still do it, I felt like crap on some days and couldn’t always reliably happily do it, especially if I was slightly under the weather, or the weather or wind was really bad. Now I can always do it, no problem at all. It’s about 40 minutes. I don’t think it’d be much faster with a 28mph motor…maybe shave 10 minutes? As for the hills, one is very steep, I crawl up it ona regular bike, and I still crawl up it on the ebike, but go a little faster and im not huffing and puffing. in fact, it barely feels like a hill, but again, im moving slow, maybe 6mph? I don’t think more power would enhance my commute, this is enough. I am not a super strong rider, justa regular recreational rider. Perhaps it would be different if I were a weak rider? I bought the bike because the dealer was nearby and I too was concerned about problems. So far, 5000 miles, zero problems. Except for chain drop. I really dislike the chain drop, chain gets really wedged in there and its difficult to pull out. I paid 2,000, worth every penny, even if the motor dies right after the 2 year warranty, but I doubt it will. To me, the warranty and nearby service is worth a lot. A bit more speed or power would not really change my commute much, although i wouldnt mind having it, just not for a big price jump. id be willing to pay, say, 300 more for the extra speed, just for the fun of it. but the 28 mph treks are way more than a 300$ price jump.. Personally, I think the verve is probably the right choice for your circumstances.
 

Marci jo

Well-Known Member
Congrats on your Verve, Mister Orange!
All the Verve owners in my cycling club LOVE them. It would be interesting to see if it is Trek’s top ebike seller.
 
Congrats on your Verve, Mister Orange!
All the Verve owners in my cycling club LOVE them. It would be interesting to see if it is Trek’s top ebike seller.
The dealer I bought mine from a few months ago stated it was their top E bike seller and I am beyond happy with mine
 
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rochrunner

Member
I saw the 2020s at a dealer the other day and see that they have fixed one of the problems with our 2019, namely the fenders. On the older models, the fenders really hugged the tires closely, and on my wife's Verve+ we were having so much trouble with the fender rubbing on the tire (not much adjustment possible) that we finally just had the dealer remove it. The 2020s have wider fenders with sufficient clearance from the tires. Good move, Trek!
 
Who has a Verve that wishes it was Faster : I have heard you can't maintain 20MPH :
I have had my Verve for about two months and ride mainly flat paved trails. Usually ride on eco-or no assist at all but have no problem maintaining 18 to 20 mph steadily but the boost does kick off at 20. I use it for recreation only so for my personal use don’t need it to go any faster and didn’t want to spend big dollars for a class3. On a couple of down hills I have hit 35 mph and I’m so impressed how stable the bike feels.
 

Rick53

Active Member
I have had my Verve for about two months and ride mainly flat paved trails. Usually ride on eco-or no assist at all but have no problem maintaining 18 to 20 mph steadily but the boost does kick off at 20. I use it for recreation only so for my personal use don’t need it to go any faster and didn’t want to spend big dollars for a class3. On a couple of down hills I have hit 35 mph and I’m so impressed how stable the bike feels.
I hear what you are saying : I have a 2019 Dual Sport 2 and a 2020 Verve 3 regular Bikes : Obviously the verve is more comfortable on longer commutes : I've been looking at Specialized Vado and Como in class 3 : The Como is similar in Upright comfort as the Verve plus : It just has the smaller tires 650 vs the Verve 700 : Although I see the New Trek Alliant has the same Smaller tires: I also hear you on the Cost$$$ : I am retired > Physically in really good shape > Plus I only weigh 178 at just under 6 ft >

I am a recreational Rider : I love to ride but it's not an addiction or a needed gas saver as it is for some . I live in Michigan so My season like it was this year is 4 months and snow on the other end and at the beginning : So for me to ride 1000 miles a season would be a lot:

My thinking is an e-bike would allow me more miles in the same time I spend now : I also notice the more I read that even with Class 3 > Getting to 28 MPH and staying there even with assist . Doesn't last the whole ride and still takes a stronger cadence speed :

Were I to go with My Wife She wouldn't even want to go over 20 : She's in better shape then I am
 
I hear what you are saying : I have a 2019 Dual Sport 2 and a 2020 Verve 3 regular Bikes : Obviously the verve is more comfortable on longer commutes : I've been looking at Specialized Vado and Como in class 3 : The Como is similar in Upright comfort as the Verve plus : It just has the smaller tires 650 vs the Verve 700 : Although I see the New Trek Alliant has the same Smaller tires: I also hear you on the Cost$$$ : I am retired > Physically in really good shape > Plus I only weigh 178 at just under 6 ft >

I am a recreational Rider : I love to ride but it's not an addiction or a needed gas saver as it is for some . I live in Michigan so My season like it was this year is 4 months and snow on the other end and at the beginning : So for me to ride 1000 miles a season would be a lot:

My thinking is an e-bike would allow me more miles in the same time I spend now : I also notice the more I read that even with Class 3 > Getting to 28 MPH and staying there even with assist . Doesn't last the whole ride and still takes a stronger cadence speed :

Were I to go with My Wife She wouldn't even want to go over 20 : She's in better shape then I am
I am in my mid-50s and the exact same height and weight. I can ride year-round in the Pacific Northwest just as long it is not pouring down rain! E bike laws vary from state to state but I am thankful I got the class one because I am finding more and more areas are not allowing class III and the trail I ride they are actually patrolling. in the last 20 years I probably put less than 100 miles on my traditional mountain bike and in two months I have about 150 miles on the Verve. I love the fact it rolls so very well if you keep the tires inflated properly and with the slightly wider tire it is very smooth and absorbs nicely. My rides usually average about one hour and on flat surfaces I am most comfortable at around 17 mph on PAS 1
 

Rick53

Active Member
I am in my mid-50s and the exact same height and weight. I can ride year-round in the Pacific Northwest just as long it is not pouring down rain! E bike laws vary from state to state but I am thankful I got the class one because I am finding more and more areas are not allowing class III and the trail I ride they are actually patrolling. in the last 20 years I probably put less than 100 miles on my traditional mountain bike and in two months I have about 150 miles on the Verve. I love the fact it rolls so very well if you keep the tires inflated properly and with the slightly wider tire it is very smooth and absorbs nicely. My rides usually average about one hour and on flat surfaces I am most comfortable at around 17 mph on PAS 1
Thanks for the feedback. I live in the country : So while I occasionally use a Bike Trail : Most of My rides are long rolling stretching of hills : And the rode surface is a Gravel based Black Top : So a Rougher Friction then riding the Trails : Many of our Trails are Privately Funded . Where you pay $30.00 a season for a pass : Keeps the Govt out of the way . Plus the Citizen funded trails are kept in far better shape. Plus we have State and County Trails where the Railroads used to go.
IMO The Govt shouldn't be wasting time patrolling Bike Trails vs far more vital things they are letting get trashed : Especially in your neck of the woods
 

rochrunner

Member
E bike laws vary from state to state but I am thankful I got the class one because I am finding more and more areas are not allowing class III and the trail I ride they are actually patrolling.
The Class 1 vs 3 rules really annoy me. If I'm riding 15mph on a trail on a Class 3 bike and they tell me I can't ride there because the bike will do 28, it would be like when I'm driving 20mph through my neighborhood and they could tell me I couldn't drive there since my car can go 100mph! In some countries, the higher-speed-rated bikes are classified more like motor scooters with a lot more requirement for lights, horn, license, maybe helmet, etc. But here it's just the "potential" top speed, when I see young hardbodies on the same paths on their triathlon bikes going as fast as a Class 3 e-bike. To me the distinction should only be pedal-assisted vs throttle-controlled.

(This rant is due to the fact that, although I'd be happy with a Class 1 bike, the only ones I've seen so far with the features that I'd like happen to be Class 3, and I'm having trouble deciding if I should go that route and just hope that I won't be caught.)
 
The Class 1 vs 3 rules really annoy me. If I'm riding 15mph on a trail on a Class 3 bike and they tell me I can't ride there because the bike will do 28, it would be like when I'm driving 20mph through my neighborhood and they could tell me I couldn't drive there since my car can go 100mph! In some countries, the higher-speed-rated bikes are classified more like motor scooters with a lot more requirement for lights, horn, license, maybe helmet, etc. But here it's just the "potential" top speed, when I see young hardbodies on the same paths on their triathlon bikes going as fast as a Class 3 e-bike. To me the distinction should only be pedal-assisted vs throttle-controlled.

(This rant is due to the fact that, although I'd be happy with a Class 1 bike, the only ones I've seen so far with the features that I'd like happen to be Class 3, and I'm having trouble deciding if I should go that route and just hope that I won't be caught.)
I completely agree many times I am blown off the road or trail by the future Tour de France wannabes. Absolutely in my opinion the distinction should be between pedal assist only and the throttle bikes. I would never attempt to do it with my bike because it is not necessary but I have read many posts where people have adjusted something in the controller to raise the top assist speed from 20 to 24 mph I don’t know if you can do that with all the bikes or only some. Maybe that is with hub drive bikes only not sure.
 

meiniles

New Member
I saw the 2020s at a dealer the other day and see that they have fixed one of the problems with our 2019, namely the fenders. On the older models, the fenders really hugged the tires closely, and on my wife's Verve+ we were having so much trouble with the fender rubbing on the tire (not much adjustment possible) that we finally just had the dealer remove it. The 2020s have wider fenders with sufficient clearance from the tires. Good move, Trek!
I ride the 2020 Verve+ 24 miles daily for my commute. Overall I'm satisfied with the bike, keeping in mind that every bike has its shortcomings.
The rear fender is a major disappointment. While I'm happy not to have the tire-rubbing problem, the fender is too short. The first time I rode in the rain I showed up at work with my back covered in a muddy spray from the rear tire. My temporary solution is to cut a water bottle in half and zip-tie / duct tape those two pieces on the end of the fender.
The chain guard can be a real pain when the chain derails. Had to turn the bike upside down to dislodge the chain and put it back on. The front light is too washed out to illuminate anything, and is partially blocked by the front fender. And the stock saddle was the worst I've ever touched.