2021 Class 3 Commuter Ebikes Thread: A Comprehensive Listing

nublar

Member
Haibike Urban Plus is class 3, comes with full fenders, kickstand, and rear rack, 2.4" 650B balloon tyres, and is only $1600
 

pushkar

Well-Known Member
Haibike Urban Plus is class 3, comes with full fenders, kickstand, and rear rack, 2.4" 650B balloon tyres, and is only $1600

I believe the price is $3599. Yes, there are a ton of options with full fenders, kickstands, rear racks. You can also build one yourself.

At Watt Wagons we are building a more refined, nuanced product. We offer the most powerful street legal (in the US) ebike , with tons of detail and components that users will typically find in a fairly high end product (think RM, Stromer etc).

I am responding specifically to the OP - building about offering or "making high powered commuter ebikes" . A commuter e-bike isn't just speed - it is the ability to commute on a wide variety of terrain, offer consistent performance in a variety of weather and be super reliable, all at the same time.
 

RUMBA

New Member
Scientific studies done to compare the safety of a 28mph e-bike vs a 20mph e-bike? Good luck finding that one. It’s not just the impact velocity that matters either. It’s that lower speed differentials give a car approaching you from behind more time to see you and react. Here’s a quote from your link on speed differential:

If on a particular road, the speed variance is high, this will result in less predictability, more encounters, more overtaking manoeuvres, etc. Therefore, when speed differences increase, the accident risk increases as well. Hence, a countermeasure that results in lower average speed, but in larger speed differences may not have the expected positive effect on road safety. But no reliable quantified relationship has been established for this linkage.

Very interesting! Thanks for sharing.
 

Ken M

Well-Known Member
I tend to think a good commuting ebike can sustain an effective average speed even going up a reasonable grade which is where a lot of ebikes fall short. I think that even though the US has higher power limits than Europe most ebike performance is still a bit short of adequate. Maybe some of the new mid-drives with 500-1000W peak power ratings will change that but I'd still like to see a good direct drive hub motor come along for idea urban mobility.
 

Nabs

New Member
Won't delimiting the speed limit effectively make many Bikes high powered and fast?
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
you still have to pedal to get those faster speeds on a 250 watt mid drive , but on a 500 watt hub motor you can power up hills faster( breaking spokes along the way) with little input from your legs. Personally I prefer the exercise.
 
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Timpo

Well-Known Member
There are quite a few 28mph commuter bikes on the market.

Haibike SDURO Trekking S 9.0
(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

Rise & Muller Delite GT Touring HS
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IZIP E3 Dash
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Bulls Twenty8 E45
Bulls-Twenty8-E45-Diamond.jpg
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
There are quite a few 28mph commuter bikes on the market.

Haibike SDURO Trekking S 9.0
(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

Rise & Muller Delite GT Touring HS
25_2.jpg

IZIP E3 Dash
(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

Bulls Twenty8 E45
Bulls-Twenty8-E45-Diamond.jpg
350w motors, 500wh batteries (except the RM)
 

christob

Well-Known Member
I'll add another plug for my favorite commuter -- the Cafe I'm riding, from Vintage Electric... 750w hub motor, class 3 and far zippier/speedier in the upper levels of assist than I ever need. I sometimes wish the battery was bigger/higher capacity (500wh), but it meets my needs and I generally recharge it every 65 - 85 miles of accumulated travel. (Granted my commute is not one of those 30-mile-one-way deals... I tend to average about 22-27 miles per biking day, with 30-mile outings on clear weekend days.)
I'd consider a bike with front suspension next time (Vintage just rolled out a new model this week, the Rambler, that appears to be a Cafe with front suspension - at about $1k more; so I'll pass for now!) just because my commute route (almost entirely on paved trails) is SO tree-root-buckled. The Cafe comes with matching fenders; I added a rear rack and now use a Bontrager "large town shopper" bag as my clip-on pannier -- flat-bottomed, straight-walled, probably the shape/size of a traditional old-school large brown paper grocery bag. Holds my work shoes, pants and shirt (I often bike in shorts, t-shirt & clip shoes) plus a few other riding necessities; I've been really happy with it as a carry-all bag.
 

Nabs

New Member
you still have to pedal to get those faster speeds on a 250 watt mid drive , but on a 500 watt hub motor you can power up hills faster( breaking spokes along the way) with little input from your legs. Personally I prefer the exercise.

But you can adjust it on the 500w motor right? I am looking at bikes of 250w motors 350w and 500w.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
But you can adjust it on the 500w motor right? I am looking at bikes of 250w motors 350w and 500w.
you really need to test ride at least a few different systems of bikes, since each system has unique characteristics. When I took my first test ride I was so impressed with the power of the 500 watt hub drive that I bought the bike right away. Only later did I realize that there is more to a system than raw power. It became clear to me that this bike was unsafe. How and when that power is delivered is very important. Now I have a less powerfull Bosch system but it delivers the power in a way that blends in with the pedal strokes almost perfectly. And I should say that I am not bashing all hub motor systems. the one I bought was too primitive but I am sure that there are great hub system bikes like OHM which solve the problems like cadence sensor response and spoke breakage.
 
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tomjasz

Well-Known Member
But you can adjust it on the 500w motor right? I am looking at bikes of 250w motors 350w and 500w.
I'm the odd user riding 250W and 350W 36V systems. They are the hardest bikes to resell. The American market seems weighted on the side of more power than brakes can effectively stop.

I communicate with disappointed riders every day. It's easier to reduce performance than to upgrade an existing system.
 

Asher

Well-Known Member
Ride1Up's 700 is a new entrant to the Class 3 commuter category; they're supposedly upgrading the motor to 750 w in their next batch in March. Battery is a little light at 672 wh, but overall the bike is well-specced (I'd happily pay an extra $50-100 for a Deore drivetrain though).


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Rick53

Active Member
Ride1Up's 700 is a new entrant to the Class 3 commuter category; they're supposedly upgrading the motor to 750 w in their next batch in March. Battery is a little light at 672 wh, but overall the bike is well-specced (I'd happily pay an extra $50-100 for a Deore drivetrain though).


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Why so many Women's Bikes ? Very few women would even want a class 3 Bike :
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
you really need to test ride at least a few different systems of bikes, since each system has unique characteristics. When I took my first test ride I was so impressed with the power of the 500 watt hub drive that I bought the bike right away. Only later did I realize that there is more to a system than raw power. It became clear to me that this bike was unsafe. How and when that power is delivered is very important. Now I have a less powerfull Bosch system but it delivers the power in a way that blends in with the pedal strokes almost perfectly. And I should say that I am not bashing all hub motor systems. the one I bought was too primitive but I am sure that there are great hub system bikes like OHM which solve the problems like cadence sensor response and spoke breakage.
same here. mine was not unsafe but it was so easy I did not work at all. though when I bought it that's what i needed because of my health issues. got a Bosch bike and made ya I have to work a little more but it is like night and day. my 500 watt mid drive bike is a eg bike. with a 52v 670 watt battery. the Bosch had a 350 watt with the 36v 500 watt batty. both at max assist the Bosch is about 1 mph or so average slower but I get 24 miles at full assist doing about 20 and the 500 watt I get maybe 14 miles. its a huge difference for such a little bit more performance.
 

BillH

Active Member
Why so many Women's Bikes ? Very few women would even want a class 3 Bike :

They are not meant as women specific bikes. Step-thru are perfect if you want a commuter or casual rider where flinging your legs constantly over a high seat or rear rack with bags on it is no longer you're idea of fun, especially when you stop often and just like to be able to plant your feet and stand a bit without worrying about injury to your junk.