2021 : Our Rides in Words, Photos, Videos & Maps

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Thanks for sharing those photos of Central Park. That is one aspect of NYC that I miss (native Bronxite). Probably my first adult bike ride was in Central Park back in the late sixties or early seventies. Whenever I visited NYC after moving away I would always visit ALICE!
I apologize for my ignorance: How big the Central Park really is? How long would it take to ride a bike from East to West, for instance?

Some Fun In My Morning Time...
Here's how you pronounce Opypy : I wonder how you would transcribe that to English?

And yes, I got my KOM...
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...yet all the competing on e-bikes is just silly. I ride a 45 km/h S-Pedelec; I'm either competing with people riding regular 25 km/h Euro e-bikes, or with ones who have derestricted their e-bikes, or with jerks on throttle operated powerful B* e-bikes. Giving it up!
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Those guys you mentioned are not jerks they are probably Americans touring Poland with their powerful ebikes.
A good joke! Unfortunately, not.
Unfortunately, e-bikes are still very expensive for a Polish budget, and we are missing no Fast'n'Furious types, either.

On Nov 1st, 2019, I was collecting my brand new S-Vado from a Specialized LBS in Warsaw. A weirdo was hanging around there: He turned out to be a pathetic "youtuber" going by nickname of WrongWay!. His "e-bike", with the whole frame triangle filled with a DIY battery looked as if it were sourced from a junkyard.

He was, like, "devouring" my Vado with his sight. I guess it was the first time he could see a premium speed e-bike. He asked about the max speed, learned my e-bike was perfectly street legal, and -- to his big surprise -- that the motor was not expected to overheat.

I could see more types like him later on my trips. I shudder to think what happens when a guy like that will appear on a bike path...

If I wanted just to be ridden (as opposite to riding a bike), I would have bought me a motorcycle or a gas powered scooter. They are not that expensive.
 

BlackHand

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Western WA
Spent last weekend at a friends' cabin east of the mountains and took the bike along hoping to get in a little riding time on the side.

It was late by the time we got back from kayaking a stretch of the Yakima River, but I figured I had just enough time for a 90 minute ride before it got dark.
strava6586273163118769228.jpg

kind of an eerie ride as there was a large smoke plume high overhead from the Schneider Springs fire 25 mi to our south and I only passed 2 cars on the road and no one on the trail for my whole ride.
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This stretch of trail is quiet, I startled a couple of deer when I came around the bend, but otherwise didn't see anything bigger than a chipmunk. Pretty part of the trail with a couple tunnels and this abandoned farmstead nestled between the river and the rail trail.
IMG_20210905_183244.jpg


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The next road crossing was about 15 miles down the trail, so by the time I got there I had to book it back on the roads before dark.
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I got back just in time to enjoy the sunset over a dinner of grilled pork chops, roasted potatoes, and fresh corn.
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Chargeride

Well-Known Member
I ordered a similar emtb with 2300W Nominal 3000W peak performance.
250nm tourqe.
I'm in my late 50's. You guys are far more physically fit than me.
My normal bike ride on my Bulls is 20 miles.
I had my Bulls deristricted to go 33 mph
but It's difficult to maintain that speed, requires me to really hump it like a bunny.
You can order Superbike assembled in the USA.
See pics.
Those guys you mentioned are not jerks they are probably Americans touring Poland with their powerful ebikes.
Nice bit of kit, Im constantly torn by what to invest in and Im driven by several factors outside of the normal aporoach.
The big bafangs are lovely..but quite a bit noisier than the HD and stealth on shared trails is important to me.
I also find it difficult to throw a lot of money at a perfect bike because my anxiety at it going missing would reach unacceptable levels.
My botched creations would cause me barely a shrug if it snapped in half...yes that happened..or I saw it being ridden off over the hill.
Its not even a financial consideration..Im lucky enough to have the cash..its just how Ive always been and building repairing and experimenting are all part of the package for me.
I realised Im not actually that into ebikes, I just love to explore and push the limits, meet like minded people and they are the perfect tool for my level of fitness.
Though its always a bad day when I ride on of my friends 7K emtbs and get back on mine.
Whats this piece of cr@p!!

As Stefan says you could just buy a scooter or dirtbike for the same money, but they would be totally antisocial in most of the places I like to visit.
Im not going to be a hypocrite while riding an overpowered bike, but I feel the constant push for emtbs now is more power..more suspension..and the gap between an ebike and an electric dirtbike is shrinking all the time and Im guilty of the same thing.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Nice bit of kit, Im constantly torn by what to invest in and Im driven by several factors outside of the normal aporoach.
The big bafangs are lovely..but quite a bit noisier than the HD and stealth on shared trails is important to me.
I also find it difficult to throw a lot of money at a perfect bike because my anxiety at it going missing would reach unacceptable levels.
My botched creations would cause me barely a shrug if it snapped in half...yes that happened..or I saw it being ridden off over the hill.
Its not even a financial consideration..Im lucky enough to have the cash..its just how Ive always been and building repairing and experimenting are all part of the package for me.
I realised Im not actually that into ebikes, I just love to explore and push the limits, meet like minded people and they are the perfect tool for my level of fitness.
Though its always a bad day when I ride on of my friends 7K emtbs and get back on mine.
Whats this piece of cr@p!!

As Stefan says you could just buy a scooter or dirtbike for the same money, but they would be totally antisocial in most of the places I like to visit.
Im not going to be a hypocrite while riding an overpowered bike, but I feel the constant push for emtbs now is more power..more suspension..and the gap between an ebike and an electric dirtbike is shrinking all the time and Im guilty of the same thing.
If I saw a video by chargeride featuring a $10,000 superbike, I would assume the account was hacked by one of those wannabee you tube influencers that completely ruined video for me. Keep it real.
 

Readytoride

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Loudoun County, Virginia
A Century Detour

Yesterday's ride was another "get it in while the weather is good", meaning I had to be out the door and on the bike before the projected heat became more "pool time" oriented rather than "cycle time". Dealing with the high degree of autumn weed pollen was another limiting factor in how far I was willing to go yesterday as well, so I settled for a relaxed 15.4 mile (24.7km) around-the-extended-block ride that kept me (for the most part) on the gravel roads and (again for the most part) under the cooling protection of the ever present woods hugging the rolling rural byways.
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There was just enough coolness to the air to make the ride pleasant, and so I took advantage of my time to linger where the roads passed interesting sights, and to cruise at speed when the road allowed. It is one of the perks of being by yourself that you get to call all the shots in how your ride unfolds, and, if intriguing detours present themselves, you can indulge without apology.

One of my favorite little detours is a short loop through a very old graveyard near my farm. I guess it can be more appropriately called a cemetery now that the old Quaker meeting house - which owns the land still - is no longer extant. It is also still an active cemetery, and I do know a few folks who have since relocated there for their final rest. I've ridden through this peaceful place enough times to, on occasion, stop and chat with people who have come to pay their respects to their own dearly departed. I heard from more than one living relative that their now deceased family member had specifically chosen this cemetary for "its beautiful views". I find that amusing, but I try not to judge. I've also been told many funny or endearing stories of the departed. I'm not shy about asking for those stories as I find that the people left behind in life often find joy in reminiscing to strangers. I love seeing the smiles on their faces as they spill the family secrets, and bring alive once again the wonderful engaging personality of the person that lies buried beneath a thoughtful tombstone and the surrounding well tended grass.

This particular cemetery is very very old, and being a genealogist I am interested in what the gravestones reveal - in their age, inscriptions, and styles that went in and out of fashion as the decades progressed. I have haunted many a graveyard, many a cemetery, looking for the graves of long lost relatives for my clients who are often thousands of miles away and unable to wander these local hallowed grounds themselves. It is an interesting profession involving a great deal of research into old records, old families, and old history. And lots of old tombstones. Just my cuppa tea.
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Anyway, my cruise through the cemetery often involves a stop at one particular grave to a person I never met in real life, but one that had a part to play in an article I wrote several years ago for a preservation society publication (the article also ended up being referenced in another magazine as well.) The article was about a local high school built in 1916 at the time when the US was transitioning from somewhat unregulated religious and church tithed funded education to a far more structured secular educational system paid by taxes. I had to seek out 100 year old courthouse documents, as well as many years of family held photographs, to piece together a lively, witty history worthy of reading. In interviewing several of the grandkids of the school's first graduating classes, as well as two 90+ year old former students who entertained me with a delightful rendition of their years at the school, I came across a photo from 1921 - a century ago - of a striking young teen posed with some of her classmates.
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I was fascinated by her fluid pose - that of an Art Neuveux ingenue - among the staid poses of her friends. As I spent weeks researching and writing the article on the school and the notable events of the decades following, that photograph never left my side. Those moments when I had time I would allow it to lead me on a chase through history, trying to track down this elusive young lady, who I discovered was named Ella Moore Brown, that had posed so beautifully for this singular photograph among her Junior classmates, but inexplicably never graduated with her Senior class. She would briefly appear in a courthouse record here or there years later, but the glimpses were fleeting and sporadic. I had found, after much digging through archived fragments, that she had married, had at least two children, and had obtained a nursing degree, but she had dodged all my other attempts to find her until a day or so before I finished the article. When I did, I was both astonished and amazed. All that time spent looking for her, and she had been right under my nose every time I rode my bike along the gravel roads of that nearby cemetery. It took me a few days of searching each tombstone erected the past 50 years in that cemetery, but I finally found her.
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My search for Ella Moore Brown ended up being a closing addendum to the article, one that I immensely enjoyed writing. Sadly, the school had burned down less than a half century after it had been built, and only the foundation remained, now serving a house that was built where the ruins once smoulderd. I bike past the site pretty much every day, sometimes glancing at the bronze commemorative plaque on the stone column standing at the driveway entrance for what used to be the school yard but now is the driveway for the resident home. All other traces of the past are gone. All the students who had graced the school with their lively antics and childhood dreams now lie buried and silent. Even the two gentlemen I interviewed for my article are now gone, one buried in this cemetery as well, just a stone's throw from Ella.

To this day everytime I bike through this cemetery I make sure Ella has flowers at her grave to remind anyone passing by that this once beautiful young girl, with the graceful Art Neuveux pose so striking in a faded photograph 100 years old, is remembered.
EllaMooreBrown-1921-309x499.jpg
 
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VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
Its actually a trike version paramotor....big fan on the back.
Im toying with the idea myself.
Ultra lights have come along way. In the early 80s I went hang gliding with a traditional Delta wing at Torrey Pines in S. Cal. It was a blast! Powered is actually safer. I’ve test flown a Kitfox with a Rotax and it was pretty impressive, but I didn’t go forward with that. Sticking with a C-172 until I die I think.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I apologize for my ignorance: How big the Central Park really is? How long would it take to ride a bike from East to West, for instance?

central park is a long rectangle, like the island (manhattan!) it sits in. 4km north to south and just .8km west to east. not stunning so much for size as it’s location smack in the middle of the most densely populated city of north america!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
central park is a long rectangle, like the island (manhattan!) it sits in. 4km north to south and just .8km west to east. not stunning so much for size as it’s location smack in the middle of the most densely populated city of north america!
Thank you for the information!
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
I apologize for my ignorance: How big the Central Park really is? How long would it take to ride a bike from East to West, for instance?

Some Fun In My Morning Time...
Here's how you pronounce Opypy : I wonder how you would transcribe that to English?

And yes, I got my KOM...
View attachment 99876\
...yet all the competing on e-bikes is just silly. I ride a 45 km/h S-Pedelec; I'm either competing with people riding regular 25 km/h Euro e-bikes, or with ones who have derestricted their e-bikes, or with jerks on throttle operated powerful B* e-bikes. Giving it up!

"Central Park in New York covers 843 acres. Central Park is located within the Manhattan borough of New York City, stretching 2 1/2 miles in length between 59th Street and 110th Street and a half-mile in width between Fifth Avenue and Central Park West."

So, probably about 4-5 miles (a tad more?) as a loop. The time I was writing about was when they first began closing the interior roads for bicycle riding in the Dark Ages. I believe that we rented bikes. But my first adult bike, after college, was purchased from a bike shop not far from Central Park. A Peugeot 10 speed. I had it for years and it moved to Seattle with me. I finally replaced it with a HANDBUILT (their ad copy) Trek which was a dream. That bike was wrecked when it and I were creamed from the rear by a pickup truck. That followed with months of non-riding and then about two years of cutting holes in saddles to accommodate my crushed left sitting bone.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania

"Central Park in New York covers 843 acres. Central Park is located within the Manhattan borough of New York City, stretching 2 1/2 miles in length between 59th Street and 110th Street and a half-mile in width between Fifth Avenue and Central Park West."

So, probably about 4-5 miles (a tad more?) as a loop. The time I was writing about was when they first began closing the interior roads for bicycle riding in the Dark Ages. I believe that we rented bikes. But my first adult bike, after college, was purchased from a bike shop not far from Central Park. A Peugeot 10 speed. I had it for years and it moved to Seattle with me. I finally replaced it with a HANDBUILT (their ad copy) Trek which was a dream. That bike was wrecked when it and I were creamed from the rear by a pickup truck. That followed with months of non-riding and then about two years of cutting holes in saddles to accommodate my crushed left sitting bone.
No one lives in NYC without scars for life I'm told.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Spent last weekend at a friends' cabin east of the mountains and took the bike along hoping to get in a little riding time on the side.

It was late by the time we got back from kayaking a stretch of the Yakima River, but I figured I had just enough time for a 90 minute ride before it got dark.
View attachment 99887
kind of an eerie ride as there was a large smoke plume high overhead from the Schneider Springs fire 25 mi to our south and I only passed 2 cars on the road and no one on the trail for my whole ride.
View attachment 99886

This stretch of trail is quiet, I startled a couple of deer when I came around the bend, but otherwise didn't see anything bigger than a chipmunk. Pretty part of the trail with a couple tunnels and this abandoned farmstead nestled between the river and the rail trail.
View attachment 99888

View attachment 99890
The next road crossing was about 15 miles down the trail, so by the time I got there I had to book it back on the roads before dark.
View attachment 99891
I got back just in time to enjoy the sunset over a dinner of grilled pork chops, roasted potatoes, and fresh corn.
View attachment 99892
We do live in a pretty state! Looks like a great ride.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
central park is a long rectangle, like the island (manhattan!) it sits in. 4km north to south and just .8km west to east. not stunning so much for size as it’s location smack in the middle of the most densely populated city of north america!
central park is a long rectangle, like the island (manhattan!) it sits in. 4km north to south and just .8km west to east. not stunning so much for size as it’s location smack in the middle of the most densely populated city of north america!
Thinking about it, if NYC sold it off for development, the proceeds would probably finance the US budget for a few years!!!
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
No one lives in NYC without scars for life I'm told.
Hmmm. I will have to look in the mirror or psychic mirror, I guess. As I sometimes have said: "My 'Wonderbread Years' are from NYC, well, The Bronx, in fact. My parents were both born just north of Central Park in Harlem. I and my sister, in The Bronx. College, was City College of NY (CCNY) also in Harlem and tuition back then started at $14 a semester. I do miss aspects of NY and NYC but escaping it on weekends was a traffic-filled nightmare. Ahhhhhhhh, nostalgia. Speaking of which, thanks, @Readytoride for a terrific report and for sending me to the dictionary to see the difference between graveyard and cemetery.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
Hmmm. I will have to look in the mirror or psychic mirror, I guess. As I sometimes have said: "My 'Wonderbread Years' are from NYC, well, The Bronx, in fact. My parents were both born just north of Central Park in Harlem. I and my sister, in The Bronx. College, was City College of NY (CCNY) also in Harlem and tuition back then started at $14 a semester. I do miss aspects of NY and NYC but escaping it on weekends was a traffic-filled nightmare. Ahhhhhhhh, nostalgia. Speaking of which, thanks, @Readytoride for a terrific report and for sending me to the dictionary to see the difference between graveyard and cemetery.
" That bike was wrecked when it and I were creamed from the rear by a pickup truck. That followed with months of non-riding and then about two years of cutting holes in saddles"
Sounds like you already earned your scars. Does anyone issue Purple Hearts for bikers?
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Hmmm. I will have to look in the mirror or psychic mirror, I guess. As I sometimes have said: "My 'Wonderbread Years' are from NYC, well, The Bronx, in fact. My parents were both born just north of Central Park in Harlem. I and my sister, in The Bronx. College, was City College of NY (CCNY) also in Harlem and tuition back then started at $14 a semester. I do miss aspects of NY and NYC but escaping it on weekends was a traffic-filled nightmare. Ahhhhhhhh, nostalgia. Speaking of which, thanks, @Readytoride for a terrific report and for sending me to the dictionary to see the difference between graveyard and cemetery.
i never lived in NYC, but spent most summers there as a kid and long working stretches as an adult. my parents were both born and raised, brooklyn primarily. my father was a proud CCNY alum. class of something like ‘56 for his undergrad, then did a masters and PHD in chemical engineering.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
" That bike was wrecked when it and I were creamed from the rear by a pickup truck. That followed with months of non-riding and then about two years of cutting holes in saddles"
Sounds like you already earned your scars. Does anyone issue Purple Hearts for bikers?
Yes, but those scars are from Podunk Seattle, well, North Bend (aka Twin Peaks). I remember at the hospital afterward complaining about the "burning" on my tush. Nurse asked me to drop my shorts and gravel tumbled out into the shower!!! I had black and blue in places one never would imagine. I do still have those shorts many years later.