2022 Turbo Vado and Turbo Tero comparison: Same bike?

chucker11

Member
Region
USA
@chucker11: As a Tero owner, could you please help solving the @Camasonian dillemma?

Camasonian is torn between the Vado and the Tero. He seems to like the long travel fork and other features of Tero, making it good for the terrain he would like to ride. On the other hand, he also needs to ride the e-bike in the city. How do you assess Chucker the stock tyres of Tero? Are they noisy on the pavement?

(There's another matter for Camasonian consideration: Class 1 (Tero) or Class 3 (Vado) but only he can determine what he really needs).
I did find that the stock tires made a a fair amount of noise. If I was using it mostly in town, I would probably switch them out. Other than my one ride on the trail, I’ve only ridden around our neighborhood. It seems well behaved but I am thinking about cutting the handlebars down so they are not so wide in traffic
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I did find that the stock tires made a a fair amount of noise. If I was using it mostly in town, I would probably switch them out. Other than my one ride on the trail, I’ve only ridden around our neighborhood. It seems well behaved but I am thinking about cutting the handlebars down so they are not so wide in traffic
Thank you for sharing the information!

The tyre noise is the reason many people swap their MTB tyres for these SUV e-bike ones:
Schwalbe Johnny Watts 60-622
This way, they get tyres that are silent on the pavement and quite aggressive off-road (several EBR Fora members have done it to their e-bikes to either "citizy" or "offroadize" their expensive e-bikes, so they can do with a single wheel set).

I would say "don't trim your handlebars" as the wide MTB bars ensure high manoeuverability of the e-bike using a long fork but do what you have to. (You could raise your bars with a stem riser to a better effect) .
 
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Camasonian

Member
Region
USA
@chucker11: As a Tero owner, could you please help solving the @Camasonian dillemma?

Camasonian is torn between the Vado and the Tero. He seems to like the long travel fork and other features of Tero, making it good for the terrain he would like to ride. On the other hand, he also needs to ride the e-bike in the city. How do you assess Chucker the stock tyres of Tero? Are they noisy on the pavement?

(There's another matter for Camasonian consideration: Class 1 (Tero) or Class 3 (Vado) but only he can determine what he really needs).
Actually I'm more torn between the Vado and Vado SL. But that is a good point on the Class 1 vs Class 3. Most of my riding will be on suburban roads where Class 3 will be nice to have.

My ideal bike is probably a Vado SL that is better setup for commuting with a more robust rack and front cockpit designed to take a front bag which one cannot do with the headlight mounted to the handlebars. One would have to lower the headlight on the Vado SL to accommodate any front bag which may not be easily done with the carbon fork and suspension on the 5.0 SL where there is no obvious place to mount it on the fork crown. By contrast, the new Vado has the headlight repositioned from the handlebars to the fork crown and they say a front rack is even in the works.

I will likely get a 2022 Vado 5.0 when I can get one from my local shop. It is probably a little heavier and "mountainy" than I really want. I would probably prefer a more higher performance pavement bike, but I also want one for commuting and the Vado is setup best for that. Every time I walk out my front door with a bike it is extremely steep and hilly and that keeps me from doing a lot of riding. I still have several high quality analog bikes for my recreational riding for when I want to toss a bike onto a car rack and drive some place to ride.
 
Region
USA
City
Oakdale
Actually I'm more torn between the Vado and Vado SL. But that is a good point on the Class 1 vs Class 3. Most of my riding will be on suburban roads where Class 3 will be nice to have.

My ideal bike is probably a Vado SL that is better setup for commuting with a more robust rack and front cockpit designed to take a front bag which one cannot do with the headlight mounted to the handlebars. One would have to lower the headlight on the Vado SL to accommodate any front bag which may not be easily done with the carbon fork and suspension on the 5.0 SL where there is no obvious place to mount it on the fork crown. By contrast, the new Vado has the headlight repositioned from the handlebars to the fork crown and they say a front rack is even in the works.

I will likely get a 2022 Vado 5.0 when I can get one from my local shop. It is probably a little heavier and "mountainy" than I really want. I would probably prefer a more higher performance pavement bike, but I also want one for commuting and the Vado is setup best for that. Every time I walk out my front door with a bike it is extremely steep and hilly and that keeps me from doing a lot of riding. I still have several high quality analog bikes for my recreational riding for when I want to toss a bike onto a car rack and drive some place to ride.
My guess is once you have the Vado 5.0 you will never look back. It is not cheap, but it is a solid and very capable choice with good hardware and I am betting once you have it, you will love it. That is my 2 cents.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I totally agree with Jim. Once you get Vado 5.0 and equip it with all-rounder tyres, you won't ever look back, Camasonian.
It is a fun to ride!

While Vado SL is a nice & lightweight e-bike, the thing really needs to be pedalled hard, and is not really good for steep hills. SL e-bikes are not all-rounders: these are the choice of a very aware and fit cyclist.

(Bear in mind I own both).
 

Marcela

Well-Known Member
I switch back and forth between my Vado and Como quite a bit and I'd like to add a bit since it involves both the Vado and Tero, something I noticed today.

I have relaxed the fit on the Vado by installing raised bars, probably something like the new Vado is using so it is not as aggressive in the forward posture. On the Como I installed the flat Vado bars making it more aggressive.

This makes the two pretty similar but still different, and here is how. Riding the Vado, even though more relaxed and similar to the newer Vado, there is enough weight on the arms that the arms are in a locked straight position during the ride, at least for me on this bike. Riding the Como, it is just relaxed enough that the arms are bent slightly but still support some weight. This acts kind of a suspension, though the arms don't get tired as they are not supporting a lot of weight. This makes a front suspension on the Como really not needed and I do have a Brooks B67 seat which is sprung.

So that is my input. The Como and Vado can be made pretty similar but with just enough difference in posture. If a person was to take the Como with flat bars and install some decent knobby tires on the 650b rims or go to a smaller tire he could keep the fenders and have a pretty good all around bike without the aggressive posture of the Vado. But they are both pretty close. Kind of wish now I had not got the step through Como now but the deed has been done. And my Vado and step through Como do weigh the same even though the Vado has the suspended fork.
 

TYJ

New Member
Actually I'm more torn between the Vado and Vado SL. But that is a good point on the Class 1 vs Class 3. Most of my riding will be on suburban roads where Class 3 will be nice to have.

My ideal bike is probably a Vado SL that is better setup for commuting with a more robust rack and front cockpit designed to take a front bag which one cannot do with the headlight mounted to the handlebars. One would have to lower the headlight on the Vado SL to accommodate any front bag which may not be easily done with the carbon fork and suspension on the 5.0 SL where there is no obvious place to mount it on the fork crown. By contrast, the new Vado has the headlight repositioned from the handlebars to the fork crown and they say a front rack is even in the works.

I will likely get a 2022 Vado 5.0 when I can get one from my local shop. It is probably a little heavier and "mountainy" than I really want. I would probably prefer a more higher performance pavement bike, but I also want one for commuting and the Vado is setup best for that. Every time I walk out my front door with a bike it is extremely steep and hilly and that keeps me from doing a lot of riding. I still have several high quality analog bikes for my recreational riding for when I want to toss a bike onto a car rack and drive some place to ride.
I’m right there with you. I was hell bent on getting the light weight Vado SL 5.0 EQ until Specialized introduced the new Vado 5.0. Despite the heavier weight, I’m now thinking the Vado 5.0 is probably the better bike for me.
 

TYJ

New Member
I totally agree with Jim. Once you get Vado 5.0 and equip it with all-rounder tyres, you won't ever look back, Camasonian.
It is a fun to ride!

While Vado SL is a nice & lightweight e-bike, the thing really needs to be pedalled hard, and is not really good for steep hills. SL e-bikes are not all-rounders: these are the choice of a very aware and fit cyclist.

(Bear in mind I own both).
Which “all-rounder tyres” do you recommend for the Vado 5.0 Stefan?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Which “all-rounder tyres” do you recommend for the Vado 5.0 Stefan?
My selection has been the 47-622 Schwalbe Smart Sam. It holds valid for pre 2022 models, as Vado Gen 1 was designed for that wheel size/tyre width. Smart Sam tyre is of dual nature: the central tread is hard and made of small knobs that ensure low rolling resistance and silence on pavement. The outer part is made of larger soft knobs that offer excellent grip on cornering, and which make the tyre bite into the soil off-road.

The 2022 Vado is equipped with 27.5" wheels. Smart Sam in size 57-584 (27.5 x 2.25) will fit the 2022 Vado perfectly. (Not sure of Johnny Watts 60-584 as it might be a tad too wide for the Vado fenders).
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
This makes the two pretty similar but still different, and here is how. Riding the Vado, even though more relaxed and similar to the newer Vado, there is enough weight on the arms that the arms are in a locked straight position during the ride, at least for me on this bike. Riding the Como, it is just relaxed enough that the arms are bent slightly but still support some weight. This acts kind of a suspension, though the arms don't get tired as they are not supporting a lot of weight.
Your experience might vary from mine, Marcela. My older Vado 5.0 came with a rigid fork. I raised the bars with a stem riser. Then I added some suspension with Baramind handlebars. And, which is important, I use Ergon GP3 grips. All these actions made my riding position pretty moderate, with no excessive leaning on the bars.

The 2022 Vado looks far more comfortable (without the modifications I've just mentioned).
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It is a very exciting experience to be able to switch between the full power Vado and the Vado SL on different rides. When I begin an SL ride, I just expect having a workout. Easy riding on Vado SL begins from as much as 60% of assistance (that's a lot!), and the e-bike never seems to be very fast although it is pleasant to ride. Anything below 60% assistance means you need to pedal hard to be at reasonably high speed. Vado SL is susceptible to headwind. Climbing a steep overpass requires me turning the Turbo on. Yes, it is me and my bad legs.

Riding the Vado 5.0 is a breeze. First of all, the e-bike is twice as strong as the SL. If I need to go on a ride with my senior friend, I reduce the assistance to as low as 20%. My gravel group rides (with leisure traditional riders) mean 33% assistance (it would be as much as 66% on Vado SL!) Group rides with strong young traditional cyclists require me using at least 50% of the full power Vado assistance, and that would be 100% Turbo for Vado SL! Now, meet headwind on such a fast group ride: I use 60% on Vado 5.0, and that's beyond Vado SL capabilities!

The roles of both e-bikes are clearly defined in my present life:
  • Vado SL is my everyday e-bike. Whenever I need to go for a small grocery shopping or set off for a long solo fitness ride, I take Vado SL in my hand, walk downstairs and just ride (for this reason, I keep Vado SL in my flat handy). I can ride gravel with Vado SL but am not inclined to ride it off-road (I have tried and was not very much happy).
  • Vado is my "heavy duty" e-bike. I use it mostly on weekends and on vacation for long, hard trips that might involve steep climbing and a lot of mild off-road riding. Vado is also the necessary e-bike for fast group rides, especially with strong people doing "gravel cycling"; Vado has enough of power for me to be on par with them. (Yet, I have to keep my Vado in storage and cannot ride it everyday)
1634111901811.png

On a 93 km (57.8 mi) leisure ride with my friend, Vado SL. (I always mount the Range Extender for any ride longer than 80 km; it's safe).

1634112159688.png

Vado 5.0 on a similar distance ride as above but with 1,500+ m (4500 ft) elevation gain, a mountain ride with 6 steep climbs en route. I always take a spare battery for any ride longer than 80 km, or whenever significant climbing is expected.

1634112793023.png

This picture clearly demonstrates Vado 5.0 climbing capability. I wouldn't have dared taking Vado SL on such a ride unless I were a totally fit person. Although Vado 5.0 is not Tero 5.0, replacing the chainring for a 38T one made my "big" Vado almost as good as Tero on mountain roads (but Vado is unsuitable for off-road technical singletrack!)
 
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shelglass

New Member
I guess I will chime in here. I bought the Tero only because if I ever want to do some moderate
single track I feel this bike will be more at home. It was between the Vado and Tero, but in the long run the Tero
is what I chose. Obviously once I get riding there will probably be upgrades that I will want. First I need to get my injured
leg healed. :)
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
You either took wrong data or don't understand bike geometry Camasonian (sorry to say that).
View attachment 103016View attachment 103017
Tero 5.0 size M and Vado 5.0 size M.

Different Reach, Trail, Head Tube Angle, Trail, BB Drop, etc etc. These are critical parameters making a commuter e-bike of Vado and an XC e-bike of Tero.

It is impossible to fit either 80.mm travel or 110 mm travel fork to the frame of the same geometry!
Yet you’ve just stated that “It has been confirmed by a Specialized salesman Tero and Gen 2 Vado share the same frame.” in another post. Sounds like @Camasonian was correct?!
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
The Vado also has a guard to keep long skirts from getting entangled in the chain, that’s why it’s so popular with both men and women alike in Poland.
Did you mean those Polish women?

1634505197572.png

The one closer to the wheel would have smashed your butt by riding her traditional gravel e-bike... :D She's beating QOMs everywhere she appears! A QOM a day! The other one often rides in a peloton, and recorded her longest ride at 250+ km!

1634507291260.png
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Skirt or not, I still cannot understand why the Japanese Specialized distributor will not import anything than two types of SL e-bikes...
 

chucker11

Member
Region
USA
It’s interesting because my wife is now torn between the tero and vado sl. She like everything about the vado sl except it won’t do so great on bigger rocks or mud. We are going to try them both again this week. She doesn’t like the large down tube on my tero is and how tall it sits. We are taking it to a gravel trail today to see how she likes it vs her cannondale city bike (analog). I rode the tero in heavy mud yesterday and it really held its line well.
 

VoltMan99

Well-Known Member
Region
Asia
City
Tokyo
Skirt or not, I still cannot understand why the Japanese Specialized distributor will not import anything than two types of SL e-bikes...
I’ve yet to check 2022 offerings but it’s probably difficult for Specialized to compete with domestic electric brands like Panasonic and Yamaha because of parity in quality and specification at half the price. If it weren’t for the light weight of the SL I’d be riding a Panasonic right now 😉.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I’ve yet to check 2022 offerings but it’s probably difficult for Specialized to compete with domestic electric brands like Panasonic and Yamaha because of parity in quality and specification at half the price. If it weren’t for the light weight of the SL I’d be riding a Panasonic right now 😉.
Ah, OK :)