2022 Turbo Vado and Turbo Tero comparison: Same bike?

Region
USA
City
Oakdale
Camasonian: There is one thing you simply cannot easily do: replacing the fork.

I would say it would be a practical thing to buy a Tero, and:
  • Add MTB fenders (if the local weather requires them)
  • Add a MTB rack such as Old Man Mountain or Topeak TetraRack
  • Replace tyres with good all-rounders such as Schwalbe Smart Sam (they are absolutely silent on pavement and offer good grip off-road)
  • Or, replace the wheels with 27.5" Wide Trail and use even better and wider e-SUV tyres such as Schwalbe Johnny Watts
  • Add external lighting
That would create a luxury, universal e-bike.
Yep, and I am guessing a lot of Tero buyers will do exactly that. When I read about the new Tero back when it was released in late September that is exactly what went through my mind. I use my Vado for city riding but I grew up riding off road and, while I am too old to go flying off jumps or anything like that now, I would not mind having a bike that just a little more off-road capable than my Vado.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Yep, and I am guessing a lot of Tero buyers will do exactly that. When I read about the new Tero back when it was released in late September that is exactly what went through my mind. I use my Vado for city riding but I grew up riding off road and, while I am too old to go flying off jumps or anything like that now, I would not mind having a bike that just a little more off-road capable than my Vado.
Hah, it is even doable to just replace the rear wheel to 27.5" with wider tyre to create the fashionable "mullet" style e-MTB :)
 

Camasonian

Member
Region
USA
N
Camasonian: There is one thing you simply cannot easily do: replacing the fork.

I would say it would be a practical thing to buy a Tero, and:
  • Add MTB fenders (if the local weather requires them)
  • Add a MTB rack such as Old Man Mountain or Topeak TetraRack
  • Replace tyres with good all-rounders such as Schwalbe Smart Sam (they are absolutely silent on pavement and offer good grip off-road)
  • Or, replace the wheels with 27.5" Wide Trail and use even better and wider e-SUV tyres such as Schwalbe Johnny Watts
  • Add external lighting
That would create a luxury, universal e-bike.
But you wouldn’t need to replace the fork. Both forks are the same 480 mm length. The difference is that the Vado has 80 mm of travel while the Tero has 110 and the Vado fork has fender mounts while the Tero fork does not. So the Vado fork is slightly more optimized for city use and the Tero is more optimized for trail use. But they aren’t that different. There are work-arounds for the fender issue as there are plenty of after-market fender options for mountain bikes. Obviously this isn’t going to be the bike for hard-core off-road downhill riding where you need a really serious fork. But for ordinary trail riding that your average e-bike duffer is doing it will be just fine. For me and probably most folks reading this we would be talking about casual riding on logging roads and the occasional trail. Not the technical double black diamond screamer stuff where you are catching serious air.
 

Allan47.7339

Well-Known Member
So it looks like the MTB guys are correct. They are essentially the same bike with a few components swapped and you could more or less go from one to the other primarily with a wheel change. You just need to decide which bike will be the predominate use case and what accessories you want to keep or swap and how often. What is not clear is what other changes to the OEM fork they specified besides travel even though they are the same model fork.
 

Camasonian

Member
Region
USA
Isn't the Tero an air fork?
Both the Tero and Vado 5.0 get OEM versions of this same air fork: https://www.sram.com/en/rockshox/models/fs-rcns-rl-d1 I’m not sure about the cheaper versions, they probably get different forks.

The Tero 5.0 version comes with slightly longer 110 mm travel and the Vado 5.0 version has shorter 80 mm travel but fender mounts and I think the Vado version is drilled for a light mount in the center of the crossover brace. At least some pictures show the headlight mounted there on the fork crossover so I assume it is drilled out for this purpose.

The biggest step between converting a Tero into a Vado is probably hooking up the lighting since this is wired into the main motor and batter on the Vado. Someone wanting to use a Tero as a commuter bike with headlights might be better off just getting separate battery-powered LED lights rather than trying to wire them directly to the bike‘s motor and drive system the way they come from the factory.
 
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Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Isn't the Tero an air fork?
Depending on the version. AFAIK, only the 5.0 is equipped with the air-fork. The 3.0 is equipped with coil loaded forks from Suntour. Saying that very delicately: The Suntour forks are less impressive than just Redshift ShockStop system comfort-wise. As I used to own a full suspension e-MTB with 150 mm travel FOX air-fork, I was quite disappointed with Suntour on my test ride. It is necessary to mention the Suntour fork is very heavy, moving the centre of gravity of Tero far forward (If I ever wanted a Tero, that would be the 5.0).

Tero 4.0 (unavailable in the U.S. but available in Europe) is equipped with a Rockshox coil fork.
 
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Camasonian

Member
Region
USA
Not sure if mentioned above that Tero is class 1 (20 miles per hour) vs Vado class 3 (28 miles per hour).

please confirm this.
I can't actually find anything on the Specialized US web site that confirms the Tero is Class 1. They definitely say the Vado is Class 3. Well, they at least say it goes up to 28 mph. But nothing on the web site about the Tero. If it is Class 1 then that would be a deal killer for me as a commuter bike.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Not sure if mentioned above that Tero is class 1 (20 miles per hour) vs Vado class 3 (28 miles per hour)
@Nxkharra is right!
1637728518132.png



If it is Class 1 then that would be a deal killer for me as a commuter bike.
1637728643573.png

 

Nxkharra

Well-Known Member
Tero being a class 1 might be a deal breaker for many. Specially commuters.
realize it has its benefits of being legal in more trails.
 

kahn

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
northWET washington
Tero being a class 1 might be a deal breaker for many. Specially commuters.
realize it has its benefits of being legal in more trails.
Okay, I will ask: Has anyone been stopped or asked to show the CLASS level of their e-bike?

I have seen only one sign that supposedly restricts a MUP to Class 1 and 2. I've seen no other signs on any of the other paths or trails I've ridden on with either of my e-bikes or before that my NON-e-bikes.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Okay, I will ask: Has anyone been stopped or asked to show the CLASS level of their e-bike?

I have seen only one sign that supposedly restricts a MUP to Class 1 and 2. I've seen no other signs on any of the other paths or trails I've ridden on with either of my e-bikes or before that my NON-e-bikes.
As I read the EBR Forum rather thoroughly, I can say "yes". There are states, counties, national parks out there in the United States where rangers keep lists of known e-bikes and indeed act.
P.S. When you think more about it, what is wrong with the 20 mph speed restriction for an e-bike? Whole Canada rides at that restriction (32 km/h). 20 mph off-road is deadly speed often.
 

Camasonian

Member
Region
USA
As I read the EBR Forum rather thoroughly, I can say "yes". There are states, counties, national parks out there in the United States where rangers keep lists of known e-bikes and indeed act.
P.S. When you think more about it, what is wrong with the 20 mph speed restriction for an e-bike? Whole Canada rides at that restriction (32 km/h). 20 mph off-road is deadly speed often.
Do the cars and motorcycles zooming by me on my left on the same exact street as me have a 20 mph speed restriction built into their machines?
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Do the cars and motorcycles zooming by me on my left on the same exact street as me have a 20 mph speed restriction built into their machines?
There have been so many threads related to these matters it is not worthwhile to spoil this interesting thread with futile talk...
 

Hammick

Member
Region
USA
Depending on the version. AFAIK, only the 5.0 is equipped with the air-fork. The 3.0 is equipped with coil loaded forks from Suntour. Saying that very delicately: The Suntour forks are less impressive than just Redshift ShockStop system comfort-wise. As I used to own a full suspension e-MTB with 150 mm travel FOX air-fork, I was quite disappointed with Suntour on my test ride. It is necessary to mention the Suntour fork is very heavy, moving the centre of gravity of Tero far forward (If I ever wanted a Tero, that would be the 5.0).

Tero 4.0 (unavailable in the U.S. but available in Europe) is equipped with a Rockshox coil fork.
I can confirm the shock on my wife's Tero 3.0 is not an air shock and is junk. I didn't realize that until we got it home. Had I know I still wouldn't have bought the 5.0 The price point of the 5.0 is too close to what you can purchase the full suspension Turbo Levo for.

I suspect I will be upgrading her shock.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
I can confirm the shock on my wife's Tero 3.0 is not an air shock and is junk. I didn't realize that until we got it home. Had I know I still wouldn't have bought the 5.0 The price point of the 5.0 is too close to what you can purchase the full suspension Turbo Levo for.

I suspect I will be upgrading her shock.
Hammick: I could see you were searching for a proper air-shock. Isn't is simpler to order a matching one via Specialized LBS? Just saying.
@Rider51?
 

Hammick

Member
Region
USA
Hammick: I could see you were searching for a proper air-shock. Isn't is simpler to order a matching one via Specialized LBS? Just saying.
@Rider51?
Well that's an option but I assume buying a fork for a Tero 5.0 with a Specialized part number would be very pricey. But you know what they say when you assume. I'll see if I can find a parts fiche for the 2022 bikes. Thanks.