24 Mile Loop Pedego Ridge Riders 11.6 ah and 14 ah

Today we took two 2016 Ridge Riders (picture 1) on an identical 24.2 mile loop. One Ridge Rider had the standard 11.6 ah battery, while the second had a 14 ah battery that had a very limited production run as a 17 ah option is coming later this year (that's the rumor anyway as I understand it).

Both riders weighed approximately the same weight, and the terrain was all road with moderate hills, the temperature was in the high seventies and humid. The 11.6 ah is out of a Pedego store's rental fleet and practically brand new while the 14 ah is brand new (and mine :)).

The big difference was the 14 ah Ridge Rider was ridden in assist levels 3, primarily 4, and once in a while 5, while the 11.6 Ridge Rider was ridden in assist 1 for 12 miles and 2 for twelve miles, and level 3 briefly on a couple of hills. The results are striking.

The 14 ah bike has 52% of it's batter left (picture 2) good for roughly 50 miles total, very respectable at the higher assist levels; while the 11.6 ah battery (picture 3) had a whopping 66% percent left meaning it would've been good at these lower assist levels for approximately 75 miles. I would love to know what percentage the 14 amp battery would have left using levels 1 and 2, likely somewhere in the seventy percentile and ninetyish miles of range, but the rising temperatures here in Nashville (Franklin) have trumped my curiosity.

As an aside, I am installing a rack, a Blinder rear strobe light rack mounted, small handlebar bag (pictured), bottle carrier, 4" handle bar riser as I am 6'1", and BodyFloat.


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Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I'll be very interested in your opinion on the pedal sense on your bike.
Even though the regional Pedego guy thinks my bike's pedal sense is working properly I have my doubts. The Pedego literature on the Rideline states:

"Levels 1-4 use a state of the art torque sensor to deliver proportional assistance based on how hard you pedal"

but with mine I often can not get the power to come on in level 1 and 2 no matter how hard I pedal. To get any electric assist I usually have to stop pedaling for a few seconds, or drop down a couple of gears. Then, strangely, when the pedaling is a lot easier the power kicks in.
Today I was doing a bit of trail riding and put a lot of effort into pedaling (level 2 at 8 mph) up a bit of a hill, but the power wouldn't come on. I had to stop pedaling for a few seconds and then the power kicked in.


 
Yeah, that doesn't sound right. I've not had a problem getting the power to kick in at any level, and it comes on relatively quickly in 1-4. The harder you pedal in 1-4 the more power you should be getting. I've ridden two Ridge Riders for pretty good distances and they both operated exactly the same.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I'm sure mine was more pedal responsive when it was new. The regional manager said the pedal sense assist is speed sensitive and will not give assist if the bike's speed to to high.
He also said that the bike may not be giving me power because I'm riding in too high of a gear.
Could you try riding in level 2 or 3 at around 12 to 15 mph in a high gear (large front chain ring) and see if you get power when you start pedaling hard? Make sure the dash is not showing any power assist before you try this.
Thanks
 
I won't be on the bike until Tuesday. But I can tell you I'll get power in a high gear in 2 or 3 at that speed because I ride there frequently. One thing to watch is the power doesn't come immediately, there can be a delay, then you can hear and feel it kick in.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
With mine it doesn't come on even after pedaling hard for 10 seconds. The only way I get the power to come on is to stop pedaling for 2 or 3 seconds, or drop at least 2 gears. I think my pedal sense has lost its sense.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I took my Ridgerider back to the shop I purchased it from. Looks like the pedal sensor needs to be replaced.
The good news is a new sensor should fix the 'no power' problem.
The bad news is it will take a week to get the part from California (I live in Canada)
Luckily, I have my road bike.
 
Wow. Sorry about that. I just posted an extensive but amateur Ridge Rider review on the Pedego forum of this site. I am approaching 300 miles, all is going well.
 

Marceltt

Active Member
I so far have put 400km on my RR and no issues yet. Live in Canada also. I do find there is a delay though before I feel the motor kick in. Takes about 1-3 turns of pedalling depending which gear I'm in.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
I just got my bike back. I took it for a short ride and everything seems to be working properly.
Does the motor kick in right away from a stop (within one pedal rotation)? It should.
Does this happen mostly when you're in level 1 at higher speeds (20+ km)? If so, I've been told that's normal.

Mine started out taking longer for the motor to kick in, then progressed to the pedal sense not working all the time, and finally a pedal sense and motor failure.
 

Marceltt

Active Member
I just got my bike back. I took it for a short ride and everything seems to be working properly.
Does the motor kick in right away from a stop (within one pedal rotation)? It should.
Does this happen mostly when you're in level 1 at higher speeds (20+ km)? If so, I've been told that's normal.

Mine started out taking longer for the motor to kick in, then progressed to the pedal sense not working all the time, and finally a pedal sense and motor failure.
I will have to try and see if it kicks in in one pedal stroke but I can't today. Raining to hard. Glad your bike came back all new.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
Went for a 70km (45 mile) ride today and almost everything worked as it should. Ridgeriders, like most e-bikes, have sensors in the brake levers that cut power when the brakes are applied. The wires from both brake levers have a connector about 6-8 inches from the brake lever. During the ride both sides disconnected a number of times. I guess it could have been dangerous if both had disconnected at the same time.
Anyways, when I got home I wrapped all the front connectors with electrical tape.

Part way through the ride my wife met me at the beach for coffee. It gave me a chance to sit on a log on the beach and take a rest. I don't think it gets any better than this.
I ended up with 48% battery life remaining.