25km/h? 32? 45? 60? What speed do you *actually* want on your e-bike?

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
I like that Nireeka 38 mph ebike. For 2-2.3k seems like a great deal.
Definitely has a better quality then a Juiced , Radpower, Aventom. Similar in performance with a Frey but no worries with shipping.
Maybe the tires are too wide but sometimes that is very safe to have.

35-38mph should be the limit for a real Class 3 ebike.

 

E-Wheels

Active Member
My ebike with the Shimano E8000 drive is now out of the warranty period and I want to try to derestrict it with a Badass box
Does any one know what firmware version is required to allow this to work
 

Mass Deduction

Active Member
My ebike with the Shimano E8000 drive is now out of the warranty period and I want to try to derestrict it with a Badass box
Does any one know what firmware version is required to allow this to work
You can do it software-only on the E8000, no box required. STUnlocker (if you have an E8000 display) or eMax (if you have an E8000 or an E6010 display and the correct cable). This will let you set the top speed on a per-mode basis (different top speeds for Eco, Trail, and Boost) up to 60 km/h, while still putting the correct speed on the display. This is a better solution as you're working with the motor instead of against it. You're not fooling the motor, as it has settings for up to 60 km/h to set. They just closed access to those settings in newer firmwares.
 

Andre50

New Member
Most of my e-bikes have been class-3 (45 km/h, 28 mph). But I've also ridden many class 1 e-bikes (32km/h, 20 mph), and bikes limited to 25 km/h.

I wasn't very satisfied with 25 km/h (15.5 mph) for commuting. I can usually ride as fast or faster than that on a muscle bike, so it didn't add a lot to the experience for me.

32 km/h was a lot better, but still less than I preferred for commuting, or for many recreational rides. That's close to my normal cruising speed on a muscle bike.

So I migrated to class 3 bikes, not necessarily because I wanted the full 45 km/h, but because I wanted something more than 32.

I finally got a bike where I'm able to manipulate the top assisted speed, anywhere from 25-60 km/h, and I can set each level of assist separately. That's allowed me to play with a bunch of different top speeds each ride, to get a sense of what I really want. Crazy fast can be fun, but it reduces range so I've been trying to find the sweet spot between adrenaline and energy efficiency.

I've found that for me, I quite like:

- a 32 km/h (20 mph) mode to be legal for use on local multi-use trails, or when nursing a low battery home

- a 38 km/h (23.6 mph) mode for riding on roads

- a 60 km/h mode (37.3 mph) mode for riding on highways and private property.

I should note that this particular bike starts cutting out at the speed you set it to, but gradually reduces assist for the next 2 km/h. So for a mode set to 38 kmh/, it starts cutting out at that and is fully cut out by the time you hit 40 km/h (24.9 mph).

I intend to explore doing long-distance touring this spring in a 25 km/h assisted mode, to get really long range on a charge.

So my question to all of you is, what top speed do you all really want? Any of you with 25 of 32 km/h bikes that long for a little more? Anyone with a 45 km/h bike that would be content with a little less? If you could set each mode of assist independently, would you and (if so) what would you set each mode to?

So my question is, if your e-bike was tuneable, what would you tune it to? Would you tune each mode of assist to the same top speed, or would you create a selection of top assisted speeds for different places you ride?
I have daymak em1, how can I get it to go faster than 32kph
 

Cheese

New Member
How is a 250w e-bike detuned to go 20mph vs a 500w 20mph bike?

I have it in my mind, that a 500w bike is better for a heavier guy like me, and would just be all around better ride.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
To my way of thinking, "de-tuned" is kinda looking at it the wrong way. The fact is, it can make full power UNTIL it hits an electronic limit (20mph) that's been placed on it. So in effect, it's governed, not de-tuned.

All else being equal, I agree the 500w works better than a 250w for a bigger guy. How that might make it "better" all around is going to depend on a lot of factors. Consider for instance a light weight rider who may have no use for any more than 250w?
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Consider for instance a light weight rider who may have no use for any more than 250w?
I'm down to 160 lb and find 1200 W geared hub useful up several 15% grades in my route. I added four such grades and 2.5 miles to avoid riding the deteriorating 11" wide berm on state road 3 to my summer property. 3.5 hours commute is entirely enough exercise, I don't want a 250 W mid drive whirring me up the hills at 2 mph. Fortunately 1200 W kits weren't illegal when I bought.
 

Mass Deduction

Active Member
[...]I have it in my mind, that a 500w bike is better for a heavier guy like me, and would just be all around better ride.
*scratching my chin*

I don't understand this focus on wattage. A 10 watt LED lightbulb can produce more light than a 60 watt incandescent lightbulb. It's not about watts, it's about how much power created per watt. I like the example of the Shimano E6000 motor being replaced by the E6100. The torque went up 20%, and the range went up 25%, on the exact same battery. Average power draw went down, but actual force generated went up.

Surely the holy grail is more torque and more range at lower wattages? Why do we want to drain our batteries faster? It makes no sense to me. I want sufficient torque and range, and I want it at the *lowest* wattage I can get it. More torque per watt means longer range, smaller/lighter batteries, less expensive systems, etc. Higher wattage means heavier/more expensive batteries and lower range.

Surely we want more efficient motors with each new generation, not motors that just drain the battery packs faster.

[...] I don't want a 250 W mid drive whirring me up the hills at 2 mph. [...]
Aren't most mid-drives variable wattage? For example, as low as 250w on the flats, but as high as 500w when hill-climbing?
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
*scratching my chin*

I don't understand this focus on wattage. A 10 watt LED lightbulb can produce more light than a 60 watt incandescent lightbulb. It's not about watts, it's about how much power created per watt. I like the example of the Shimano E6000 motor being replaced by the E6100. The torque went up 20%, and the range went up 25%, on the exact same battery. Average power draw went down, but actual force generated went up.

Surely the holy grail is more torque and more range at lower wattages? Why do we want to drain our batteries faster? It makes no sense to me. I want sufficient torque and range, and I want it at the *lowest* wattage I can get it. More torque per watt means longer range, smaller/lighter batteries, less expensive systems, etc. Higher wattage means heavier/more expensive batteries and lower range.

Surely we want more efficient motors with each new generation, not motors that just drain the battery packs faster.



Aren't most mid-drives variable wattage? For example, as low as 250w on the flats, but as high as 500w when hill-climbing?

My thought regarding higher wattage motors - assuming the motor has been rated by it's ability to dissipate heat - NOT add hype/wishful thinking.

ALL else being equal, if we compare a 250w motor with a 500w for instance, both motors will draw the same amount of power/wattage up to the point the 250w is running at max available torque. At that point, the 250w is not able to produce any more (without going into an overheat scenario), but the 500w is only running at half available. It's only when the 500 is operated at a higher wattage that it's using more power than the 250w. So bottom line, each will use the same amount of power until the 250 is all tapped out, where the 500 will just be starting to warm up....

Regarding mid drives being variable wattage, no rocket science here. The motors are no different than any other brushless motor. You control the amount of power they're making with the amount of power you're feeding them. -Al
 

Nutella

Active Member
I'm happy with riders having the ability to ride as fast as they want as long as it is in an appropriate place. A street or empty bike path, go right ahead, if you crash and hurt anyone, it'll just be you. On a bike path with people on it, even 15 or 20mph might be too fast. Pedestrians are erratic, it's too easy for someone to turn and step right into your path.
 

Mass Deduction

Active Member
My thought regarding higher wattage motors - assuming the motor has been rated by it's ability to dissipate heat - NOT add hype/wishful thinking.

ALL else being equal, if we compare a 250w motor with a 500w for instance, both motors will draw the same amount of power/wattage up to the point the 250w is running at max available torque. At that point, the 250w is not able to produce any more (without going into an overheat scenario), but the 500w is only running at half available. It's only when the 500 is operated at a higher wattage that it's using more power than the 250w. So bottom line, each will use the same amount of power until the 250 is all tapped out, where the 500 will just be starting to warm up....

Regarding mid drives being variable wattage, no rocket science here. The motors are no different than any other brushless motor. You control the amount of power they're making with the amount of power you're feeding them. -Al
I can't disagree with anything you say, but it's an incomplete assessment IMO. What if that 250w motor is super efficient, whereas that 500w motor is less efficient and produces less speed/torque at 500w than the other does at 250w? Again, the LED vs. incandescent lightbulb example. An incandescent lightbulb is mostly good at wasting power as heat, whereas the LED lightbulb is very efficient at producing light.

Back to the example of Shimano increasing torque 20% while also increasing range 25% from one generation to the next (on the same battery). These efficiency gains aren't just theoretical, they're very real.

Give me the most efficient motor, at the lowest wattage possible, that will do what I need it to do. Every time.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I can't disagree with anything you say, but it's an incomplete assessment IMO. What if that 250w motor is super efficient, whereas that 500w motor is less efficient and produces less speed/torque at 500w than the other does at 250w? Again, the LED vs. incandescent lightbulb example. An incandescent lightbulb is mostly good at wasting power as heat, whereas the LED lightbulb is very efficient at producing light.

Back to the example of Shimano increasing torque 20% while also increasing range 25% from one generation to the next (on the same battery). These efficiency gains aren't just theoretical, they're very real.

Give me the most efficient motor, at the lowest wattage possible, that will do what I need it to do. Every time.
I was working with today's reality. I think we ALL look forward to lighter, more efficient motors AND batteries!

Fresh in my mind was what turned out to be a much bigger upgrade than what I expected. I swapped a 1500w direct drive for a 1000w gear drive. No other changes so a direct heads up comparison. Not only did I pick up the big performance increase I expected at the speeds I spend most of my time riding, there was an unexpected bonus as I went from a 25 mile battery range to a 35 mile range!

Point being, wise choices made powering your bike can be a really big deal....

Still no magic regarding mid drive motors. -Al
 

steve marino

Active Member
20 MPH is plenty. What I want is more range. As someone so wisely pointed out on this forum, if you're going 30+ mph on a bike, you are probably going to get killed by a car driver because they don't expect a bike to go that fast, they're familiar with 20 MPH, tops, and will judge their distances and reactions accordingly. It makes a LOT of sense to me. Look, you know they're going be fooling with their phone and turn in front of you anyway, right? Would you rather that happen at 20 MPH, or at 30 MPH? There are no do overs in the morgue. This life ain't a trial run, this is it.
 
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