3-D printed ebike - Platzhirsch

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
3-D printed Chromoly steel.


Amazing how technology for manufacturing is advancing as well as the end product.

Interesting frame design that is apparently acting as a 'suspension' of sorts to cushion the ride.

There are other 3-D printed ebikes out there, but this one is fairly unique.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Article says “The frame is made out of 'organic steel' that is then 3D-printed according to Urwahn's specifications”
Doesn’t sound like chromoly.
 
Last edited:

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
In another article, there is the company's own reference to the 'organic' shape (silhouette) of the frame, and made out of steel. Hence the 'organic steel.'. They intended it to be minimalist. All wires completely hidden inside frame. Looks like they accomplished that.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Any idea how you extrude a line of chromoly and get the next layer to stick to it? Must be different than any process I am aware of.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Any idea how you extrude a line of chromoly and get the next layer to stick to it? Must be different than any process I am aware of.
There is a bit of explanation out there on a process called DMLS, or Direct Metal Laser Sintering, where they start with powdered metal and essentially fuse atomized particles. Layer by layer you 'print' any complex geometry you want.

The more you dig into it, there is a ton of info on metal printing and at least several processes. Another one is DMP. The whole world has gone totally 'digital.' Basically digitizing atoms and making whatever you want. Basically any material and not just the more common plastic or polymers. Seems like an off shoot of nanoscale material development and manufacturing.

I guess we can forget about our 'old school' knowledge of extrusion or hydroforming or welding etc.
 
Last edited:

indianajo

Well-Known Member
In the 1950's bike frames could fall apart at the weld to the steering tube, and stab you in the belly. I was done so, by a bike from Sears made in W. Germany. 3 spot welds "held" the frame tube on to the steering tube.
As bad as ****ese quality is, the bike manufacturers have made sure that doesn't happen these days. A $200000000 lawsuit might be won. The *****iest Diamondback or Pacific frame has held together for me, even when I weighed 213 lb and was carrying 50 lb groceries in a 25 lb basket. I did break a shimano 6 speed rear axle, which didn't stab me.
Now some dingbat wants to make that joint with 3D sintering of powdered metal? Tort lawyer's sharpen your pencils!
 

Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
In the 1950's bike frames could fall apart at the weld to the steering tube, and stab you in the belly. I was done so, by a bike from Sears made in W. Germany. 3 spot welds "held" the frame tube on to the steering tube.
As bad as ****ese quality is, the bike manufacturers have made sure that doesn't happen these days. A $200000000 lawsuit might be won. The *****iest Diamondback or Pacific frame has held together for me
Bikes sold in the United States have to meet CPSC standards, which include strength requirements for frames and forks.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Here's an interesting video, showing the issues of fatigue strength. It looks like the bike announcement could easily just be a marketing gimmick.
 

Mike's E-Bikes

Well-Known Member
Here's an interesting video, showing the issues of fatigue strength. It looks like the bike announcement could easily just be a marketing gimmick.
Wow ! Who knew we had all these material strength and properties, and 3-D steel printing 'expert's' here on the EBR forum ? ;)
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
In the 1950's bike frames could fall apart at the weld to the steering tube, and stab you in the belly. I was done so, by a bike from Sears made in W. Germany. 3 spot welds "held" the frame tube on to the steering tube.
As bad as ****ese quality is, the bike manufacturers have made sure that doesn't happen these days. A $200000000 lawsuit might be won. The *****iest Diamondback or Pacific frame has held together for me, even when I weighed 213 lb and was carrying 50 lb groceries in a 25 lb basket. I did break a shimano 6 speed rear axle, which didn't stab me.
Now some dingbat wants to make that joint with 3D sintering of powdered metal? Tort lawyer's sharpen your pencils!
The tort lawyers are already too busy with carbon fiber bikes to do anything else.

Google "carbon fiber bike catastrophic failure". And look at the images and try not to cringe.