48v 1000w kit on 60v.

Cody196

Member
Hello, so I need some help figuring out how to have my motor move in a 60v battery pack, so everything is functional at 48v but when i add one more 12v battery for 60v the lights on the throttle still show, it turns on and everything bu it don't engage the motor at all,so i revert back to 48v and it all works fine. Is there something in my controller limiting voltage or a wire i can undo?
 

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Berry78

Active Member
You might wanna go to endless sphere for many of your build questions. I think they are more active builders over there. 'Round here people tend to get prebuilt bikes or systems.

Do be careful. Batteries can be super dangerous if you don't know what you're doin'.
 

Cody196

Member
It lets me add an extra 6v and the wheel spins faster on 54v than on 48v but 60v it is beyond the limit i am assuming is 59-60v limit
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
All controllers should have a low voltage cutoff (LVC) circuit, which shuts off the motor if the battery is too low, to protect the battery. A few controllers have a high voltage cutoff (HVC) to protect the controller, but I don't know if it is common.

The results suggest that's what is happening to your bike.
 

Cody196

Member
Do you know any way i can bypass, I had in mind to use jsut an off/on switch wired to batteries and motor but the problem is my hub motor has three phase wires and 5 hall wires so idk which is negative and which is positive to wire to batteries. or is there any wire i can cut that goes to throttle to bypass high voltage limit. Any suggestions?
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
If there was a circuit diagram, one could find out why it doesn't work at 60 volts, and probably figure out a work around. Since these are pretty much unavailable , all you can do is buy a controller that will handle 60V and 1000W.
 

Cody196

Member
If there was a circuit diagram, one could find out why it doesn't work at 60 volts, and probably figure out a work around. Since these are pretty much unavailable , all you can do is buy a controller that will handle 60V and 1000W.
could you send me a link to a good one that might work with my kit picture above. I looked and looked and they are all chinese ones with different type of phase connectors. PS, i no longer trust anything from china.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
Everything with ebikes is made in China. You have a pretty simple kit with only a thumb throttle and switch. Go on endless-sphere and ask.
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
i dont use endless-sphere.
Cody, Endless Sphere is another forum, but it is all about DIY - building, tweaking and customizing ebikes. You'll likely get many more responses for customizing your bike there. It's also likely you'll find out where to buy the parts you want.

EBR is more for discussing factory ebikes and complete kits. In addition the Insiders that post here and Court's reviews, EBR forums are great for researching for the purpose of buying an ebike. And of course there are the lifestyle forums here.

Good luck on your build and do come back and share your bike with us. Pictures and videos are always a welcome addition to owner's reviews. You never know if someone lurking here needs the answers you'll be able to supply.

Have fun with it!
 

JohnT

Active Member
I would guess that your controller isn't capable of handling a 60V battery pack, so it's protecting itself. I doubt there's a way to bypass it, and if you did, you'd probably fry your fets or something.

Without knowing your specs, I'd guess that to run 60V, you'll need to upgrade at least your controller and maybe your throttle. Your motor would *probably* handle short bursts of full power at 60V but might overheat before too long, depending on what you're running.

I can't tell for sure whether or not you know what you're doing, but if you don't, I recommend learning before modifying your system. As mentioned, Endless Sphere is a good resource. You don't have to join to search through threads.
 

Cody196

Member
I would guess that your controller isn't capable of handling a 60V battery pack, so it's protecting itself. I doubt there's a way to bypass it, and if you did, you'd probably fry your fets or something.

Without knowing your specs, I'd guess that to run 60V, you'll need to upgrade at least your controller and maybe your throttle. Your motor would *probably* handle short bursts of full power at 60V but might overheat before too long, depending on what you're running.

I can't tell for sure whether or not you know what you're doing, but if you don't, I recommend learning before modifying your system. As mentioned, Endless Sphere is a good resource. You don't have to join to search through threads.
i have enough wiring and electrical knowledge to make my own battery pack if i wanted to
 

Jayson

New Member
Maybe there is a over voltage protection inside controller.You can ask the controller builder program to try a new program.
 

Shoestring

Active Member
Hey Cody, your controller most definitely cannot handle the 60V, full charge on 48v system is 54,6v a 52v battery is around 58.8v most 48v controllers can handle up to 59.9v before HVCO, dumping 60v into the system will with 99% certainty, smoke your controller!
 

Cody196

Member
Hey Cody, your controller most definitely cannot handle the 60V, full charge on 48v system is 54,6v a 52v battery is around 58.8v most 48v controllers can handle up to 59.9v before HVCO, dumping 60v into the system will with 99% certainty, smoke your controller!
hey do you think you could link me or find me a 60v controller that you may think would work with my kit? And I agree with you about the 59.9v limit since i can hook an extra 6v to it.
 

Shoestring

Active Member
cody196: I'm not sure exactly which individual controller would be suitable for your application, but the folks at Grin Technologies could probably fix you up. Their Grinfenion controllers are some of the most universal and adjustable units on the market. voltage from 24-72 and more, sensord and sensorless . Check 'em out.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Check your voyage, you may be putting out 70V with fully charged SLA. Well over the usual limit for budget controllers. ES and look for Wesnewel he's a big fan of the low end kits and may have some better insight. That said there's no guarantee that with a new controller, the motor can take the voltage without overheating..