5 Bosch Display Choices - Good, Bad and Ugly

webcurl

Active Member
Hi, does anyone with Cobi know if it get's the speed/distance readings from the Bosch motor or the phone's GPS or if there is a setting to change between the 2?
 

AlanDB

Well-Known Member
I am not familiar with the Cobi settings, but if there is a setting for tire circumference, my guess is that it gets its speed from the controller by counting wheel revolutions per unit of time. It has been interesting comparing the speed on the Intuvia display to the speed shown on my Garmin Oregon GPS. The Bosch system seems to inflate the speed and doesn't respond as quickly to speed changes as the GPS does. This is easy to observe if you make a quick stop and the Intuvia will still be showing a non-zero speed for a split second.
 

webcurl

Active Member
I am not familiar with the Cobi settings, but if there is a setting for tire circumference, my guess is that it gets its speed from the controller by counting wheel revolutions per unit of time. It has been interesting comparing the speed on the Intuvia display to the speed shown on my Garmin Oregon GPS. The Bosch system seems to inflate the speed and doesn't respond as quickly to speed changes as the GPS does. This is easy to observe if you make a quick stop and the Intuvia will still be showing a non-zero speed for a split second.
I assume that if the Cobi can only use the speed info provided by Bosch via it's CAN bus then the circumference is already dialed-in via factory and/or shop and adjustable via Intuvia or Nyon.
All battery powered GPS product's are not 100% correct either, their accuracy is a trade off between accuracy and battery saving.
eg. How often it gets a fix, how accurate that fix is estimated to be and the algorithms used in averaging the data in-between.
Try using different trip recording apps on a phone and look at the differences! I have an old, small GPS based Garmin bike computer and found that OsmAnd+ with tweaks on my Android phone was far more accurate with distance, speed, average speed, etc.
OsmAnd+ logging options:
 

Attachments

  • Capture+_2019-03-27-14-49-14.jpg
    Capture+_2019-03-27-14-49-14.jpg
    282.4 KB · Views: 118
  • Capture+_2019-03-27-14-50-27.jpg
    Capture+_2019-03-27-14-50-27.jpg
    303.9 KB · Views: 145
Last edited:

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
Calibration of wheel circumference …

Based on my limited experience with Bosch computers:
  • Purion – not possible for user to set wheel circumference.
  • Kiox – straightforward to set circumference in 1 mm increments between 2080 and 2290 mm.
Yesterday's ride on the Kiox-equipped Homage was recorded as 88.5 km by both Ride with GPS (running on my iPhone 6) and the Kiox display. Again, according to both the Kiox and my Ride with GPS records, the total distance ridden on the Homage is 3297 km.

The Purion's recorded distance is at best an approximation. Ride with GPS claims (correctly, I think) that the now largely-neglected Trek Powerfly 5 has travelled 4436 km but its Purion is more optimistic claiming that it's covered 4625 km. This is a daft state of affairs akin to owning a watch that can never be set it to the correct time.
… David
 
Last edited:

lerxst

Member
Calibration of wheel circumference …

Based on my limited experience with Bosch computers:
  • Purion – not possible for user to set wheel circumference.
  • Kiox – straightforward to set circumference in 1 mm increments between 2080 and 2290 mm.
Yesterday's ride on the Kiox-equipped Homage was recorded as 88.5 km on both Ride with GPS (running on my iPhone 6) and the Kiox display. According to both the Kiox and my Ride with GPS records, the total distance ridden on the Homage is 3297 km.

The Purion's recorded distance is at best an approximation. Ride with GPS claims (correctly, I think) that the now largely-neglected Trek Powerfly 5 has travelled 4436 km but its Purion is more optimistic claiming that it's covered 4625 km. This is a daft state of affairs akin to owning a watch that can never be set it to the correct time.
… David
Just curious, what makes you prefer the Homage to the Powerfly?
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
What makes you prefer the Homage to the Powerfly?
Lerxst …
It's not Purion versus Kiox, so I'll have to go off-topic for a moment!
  • Control Technology – superb full suspension designed for trail and road rather than mountain biking.
  • Rohloff electronic IGH
  • Gates belt drive
  • 1 kWh dual battery
  • dramatic, rugged appearance
Yesterday's ride would have pushed the Powerfly to its range limit – at 88 km, feasible but I'd have been watching the Purion's display rather carefully.

On my 'everyday rides' on rural washboard roads and the local rail trail the Homage is in its element.

In a way the comparison between Homage and Powerfly is similar to one between today's best passenger-oriented 4x4s and classic military-style 'general purpose' 4x4s.
… David
 
Last edited:

webcurl

Active Member
Hi, does anyone with Cobi know if it get's the speed/distance readings from the Bosch motor or the phone's GPS or if there is a setting to change between the 2?
 
Has anyone upgraded from Purion to Nyon?

I have been reading all over these forums and there is a lot of great information on replacing the Intuvia controller with the Nyon Controller, but I have not found information for replacing the Purion display/controller with the Intuvia/Nyon cradle. I read where one person had made the change and stated the hardest part was running the cable to the motor. Does anyone have any tips before I try this?

BTW - I have the Cannondale Synapse NEO 2. LOVE the bike. I am hoping it gets me back into biking shape by allowing me to get up hills that otherwise would prevent me from biking at all. 10 lbs down so far in first month. LOTs to go.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
I have not done an installation replacing the Purion with an Intuvia/Nyon mount. As I understand it, it requires that the motor be dropped from the bottom of the bike which will expose the bottom of the down tube where the cable runs down from the top of the down tube. Removeing the motor requires

  • Remove both cranks
  • Remove the plastic motor cover by removing the three torx screws on the left side of the cover
  • Remove the motor mounting bolts on both sides of the motor

How easy removing the Purion calbe and running the Intuvia cable is depends on which bike you have. One trick that might be helpful is as follows:

  • Attach a thin, strong piece of twine to the motor end of the connecting cable.
  • After tying the twine to the end,
  • use electrical tape to tightly wrap the joint between the tape and the cable, smoothing out any angles or bumps so that it will pass smoothly past other cables while moving through the tube.
  • Pull the cable up and out from the top of the down tube.
  • Once the end of the cable has emerged through the exit hole at the top of the down tube, remove the tape and untie the twine.
  • Tie the motor end of the new cable to the twine that is now running in to the top of the tube and out the bottom.
  • Wrap it with electrical tape and pull the Intuvia cable down through the tube.
 

Velome

Member
Lerxst …
It's not Purion versus Kiox, so I'll have to go off-topic for a moment!
  • Control Technology – superb full suspension designed for trail and road rather than mountain biking.
  • Rohloff electronic IGH
  • Gates belt drive
  • 1 kWh dual battery
  • dramatic, rugged appearance
Yesterday's ride would have pushed the Powerfly to its range limit – at 88 km, feasible but I'd have been watching the Purion's display rather carefully.

On my 'everyday rides' on rural washboard roads and the local rail trail the Homage is in its element.

In a way the comparison between Homage and Powerfly is similar to one between today's best passenger-oriented 4x4s and classic military-style 'general purpose' 4x4s.
… David
I have a Powerfly 5 and wish I had a rear suspension. How do you compare the ride between the Powerfly 5 and the Homage?
 

GuruUno

Well-Known Member
I'm considering to add the Intuvia setup to my Trek SuperCommuter 8. My ONLY questions are:
1> Do I do it myself or have the bike shop do it? (opening the motor cover/access to attach wire, voiding warranty issues???)
2> IF the bike sop is to do it, expected costs?
3> IF I do it, obviously the warranty would be voided, so IF that were the case, so do I add a Speedbox?
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Adding the intuvia should not take more than an hour of shop labor, most of it in removing the motor and running the cable through the down tube. If done by a Bosch certified (which Trek techs are) mechanic there should be no warranty issues.

knowing how generally bulletproof Bosch motors are, I am comfortable running the risk of installing my Bikespeed RS and losing the warranty. The bike is so much more without the 20mph cap on assistance. But wait...isn't the Supercomuter 8 a high speed 28mph bike? Adding a delimiter to a class 3 does not gain you very much that is useful. I wouldn't do it. The loss of warranty would not be worth the boost over 28 which happens so infrequently.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
It is 28 MPH, so I gain minimal speed?

It does not make your bike faster. It just takes the upper limit on assisted speed off the system. On a class 1, 20mph bike, it gives you another 8-10 mph, up to 30 realistically. On a class 3, 28mph bike, it only gives you another 2mph and then very infrequently. Faster than that on a pedal assisted bike with 350 watt or less is just not a sustainable speed for most mortals.
 

Toomanycats

Active Member
It does not make your bike faster. It just takes the upper limit on assisted speed off the system. On a class 1, 20mph bike, it gives you another 8-10 mph, up to 30 realistically. On a class 3, 28mph bike, it only gives you another 2mph and then very infrequently. Faster than that on a pedal assisted bike with 350 watt or less is just not a sustainable speed for most mortals.
It’s going to depend on your weight, terrain, and fitness level. Personally, I’ve only been able to achieve the 28 mph my bike is theoretically capable of on a steep downhill with a following wind, and I think I’d actually have gone faster on a lighter acoustic bike.
 

GuruUno

Well-Known Member
I regularly hit 28. I am 230 lbs. Last week I was going downhill, cranking maxed out in turbo, I hit 46 MPH.
 

David Berry

Well-Known Member
Region
Australia
City
Ipswich, QLD
Which of the Bosch displays will show rider's cadence during the ride?
Kiox does. It's quite legible but, in true Kiox style, it is displayed on only one screen which is quite likely not the screen that you'll want!

Sorry, I cannot take a photo as my Homage is in hospital yet again.
 
Last edited: