72 years old, need recommendations

Gordon71

Well-Known Member
I do not know ANYTHING about bicycles, except how to ride an old fashioned one. I am looking for recommendations for an electric bike, which I could use to get smallish amounts of groceries, that can take hills, and possibly dirt/gravel roads. Am thinking about full-time RVing and want to be able to be mobile without a vehicle. I am 72 years old, weigh 150, and am reasonably fit...can walk 8 or more miles in one session on flat ground with no worries, can adjust to mountain elevations, but it takes a day or two. As my knees are somewhat arthritic, I don’t do hills very well. Either a bicycle or tricycle would be okay with me, but like the idea of a tricycle better. One with a fair amount of range seems like the best idea, as camping grounds can be a bit distant from fair-sized markets. Perhaps something that is “street legal”? Your recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
Maybe one of the new Lectric XP 2.0s would be a good way to start.
 

MsKathleen

New Member
Region
USA
30-40 miles is typical range with full assist or near full assist. But you got to recharge after that. So consider how you will recharge. RV site is a plug in?

If you want a lighter bike (<45#) and reasonable quality, it will be more expensive (> 2.5-3K)

Try to stick to a name brand so you can get service on the road while RV'ing.

Lastly, just go try some out. Make an appointment at a shop in a big city and make the trip. Gazelle, makes good mid range bikes. It is what my dealer sells to people who just want to get a bike and ride at a reasonable price point. Best of luck.
Thank you for your response.
 

MsKathleen

New Member
Region
USA
My wife who is 76 has the Evelo Compass e-trike which she likes very much (https://evelo.com/products/compass). With 2 batterries installed, it weighs about 90 pounds.

She started with a 2 wheel Blix Aveny ebike which she also liked, but developed some health problems after a couple of years which gave her some balance issues on the ebike. So we switched her to the Compass trike. If you are used to riding a bicycle, the trike takes some getting used to and they do tip over quite easily if you take corners too fast.
Thank you.
 

MsKathleen

New Member
Region
USA
My $0.02:

Find a good bike shop in a city nearby (probably Yuma or Tucson) and start up a relationship with them. If they can arrange for you to try an e-bike or two that would help you narrow down your choices. There are probably lots of bikes that will work great for you.

Given what you've said about your knowledge of bikes, you probably aren't going to be able to work on derailleurs or disc brakes so I'd recommend getting a name brand bike with a dealer network so as you travel you can have the bike worked on as you need it -- both basic maintenance, any enhancements you decide you'll need, and fixing whatever breaks (and stuff will break). Another argument for going through a dealer is that given what you want to use the bike for, you'll probably want a rear rack and possibly a front basket -- and getting those things right is more likely to happen if you work through a dealer.

No matter what you budget on a bike, expect to spend at least $500 on accessories: a decent helmet, a bike lock, some bike bags, and some basic tools can add up quickly. When you are traveling in your RV I'd also recommend bringing a floor pump or a small air compressor (personally I prefer a floor pump).

Also work with your bike shop so you can at least master emergency field repairs like fixing a flat tire. And basic maintenance like cleaning and oiling your bike chain. They should be happy to teach you.

Edit:

I'm going to add that it seems from your description that you are reasonably active and fit. From that I'd conclude that you'll be happier on a decent e-bike from Trek or Specialized.
Thank you for your response. The considerations you included are important.
 

MsKathleen

New Member
Region
USA
Welcome to EBR MsKathleen. There is a world of help here at your finger tips in my estimation. We all express things differently.

I would say that you need to be patient with a little "lingo/jargon" that is germane to your purchase if you would like the best chance of buying the right bike for you the first time. Google is a quick solution for any of the jargon if you want.

Rather than there being an answer to your query I would say there are tens or hundreds of answers right now. So even when people help to narrow it down there is still lots of choice involved.

It always strikes me in my field (I'm an arborist) that if a person can tell me what they want I can tell them how to get it. So maybe narrow down things with more of what you want the bike to do for you, be like, cost, etc.
Thank you for your response.
 

Scona

New Member
Region
Canada
Your response is very informative and thought -provoking. I will review your link, as I am 63”. If you can suggest a trustworthy shop in either location, I will go, but I am not going to just run into any bike shop, because too many places try to cheat little old ladies like me. That is why I came here first. Research helps weed out the jerks.
I would bet they have to get up pretty early to put one by you......
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Thank you for your response.
Unless you´re really uncomfortable with two wheels, this is a cheap, rugged, & powerful bike with
more range than you´ll probably ever need. The downside is that like any ebike. it does need
regular attention to maintenance. Itś a German bike in spite of the name, Moscow.(this outfit
names all it´s bikes for cities, guess they hoped to sell in Russia.) At 150 pds your knees are
covered; the pedals would practically be rotary foot rests & you could probably get 25 miles on
throttle only. I´ve 3300 mi. on mine, the only issues being tires & spokes because of my weight.
Not a problem for you. It´s currently $1059 from Leoncycles in seattle, but being a newbee, I´d
suggest spending the extra $300 on the Moscow+ since it has hydraulic brakes that do not
require regular adjustment as well as other upgrades. That 27.5 frame would best suit you.
Anyone inexperienced owning any ebike would benefit from studying maintenance tutorials
on Utube if only to gain a better understanding of how bikes work. You probably won´t be
working on your choice. A focus on rider safety is also very strongly advised; at our age
injury is not swift to mend. Whatever you get, take it slow & careful til you get the feel for it.
P.S. you might also look at the ´Aspen´ which is NCM´s fat tire versions of the Moscow
costing just a little more except when it comes to tires. The stock moscow tires would be
comfortable for you, stay away from cactus.
 

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MsKathleen

New Member
Region
USA
Unless you´re really uncomfortable with two wheels, this is a cheap, rugged, & powerful bike with
more range than you´ll probably ever need. The downside is that like any ebike. it does need
regular attention to maintenance. Itś a German bike in spite of the name, Moscow.(this outfit
names all it´s bikes for cities, guess they hoped to sell in Russia.) At 150 pds your knees are
covered; the pedals would practically be rotary foot rests & you could probably get 25 miles on
throttle only. I´ve 3300 mi. on mine, the only issues being tires & spokes because of my weight.
Not a problem for you. It´s currently $1059 from Leoncycles in seattle, but being a newbee, I´d
suggest spending the extra $300 on the Moscow+ since it has hydraulic brakes that do not
require regular adjustment as well as other upgrades. That 27.5 frame would best suit you.
Anyone inexperienced owning any ebike would benefit from studying maintenance tutorials
on Utube if only to gain a better understanding of how bikes work. You probably won´t be
working on your choice. A focus on rider safety is also very strongly advised; at our age
injury is not swift to mend. Whatever you get, take it slow & careful til you get the feel for it.
P.S. you might also look at the ´Aspen´ which is NCM´s fat tire versions of the Moscow
costing just a little more except when it comes to tires. The stock moscow tires would be
comfortable for you, stay away from cactus.
Thank you for taking the time to respond. I liked most everything about this bike, except the step-thru is pretty high and I don’t see my knees improving any. Starting to think a moped might be a better idea for me.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
I very nearly pulled the trigger on the rad runner, but being tall, I felt getting the right extension for pedaling
would be awkward, & was also concerned about the spokes. THat said, I think it would be a fine choice
for you, Kathleen. It does offer some nice accessories for carrying things. I´ve no doubt it would be more
comfortable than what I ride,
 

MsKathleen

New Member
Region
USA
I very nearly pulled the trigger on the rad runner, but being tall, I felt getting the right extension for pedaling
would be awkward, & was also concerned about the spokes. THat said, I think it would be a fine choice
for you, Kathleen. It does offer some nice accessories for carrying things. I´ve no doubt it would be more
comfortable than what I ride,
Thank you for your response. I have the opposite concern, as I am only 5’3”. I will be testing the RadRunner1 when I go to San Diego in July. And, yes, the accessories for carrying things are very attractive to me, too, excluding the box that mounts between the legs, which removes the attractive and low step-thru that I desire.
 

MsKathleen

New Member
Region
USA
Unless you´re really uncomfortable with two wheels, this is a cheap, rugged, & powerful bike with
more range than you´ll probably ever need. The downside is that like any ebike. it does need
regular attention to maintenance. Itś a German bike in spite of the name, Moscow.(this outfit
names all it´s bikes for cities, guess they hoped to sell in Russia.) At 150 pds your knees are
covered; the pedals would practically be rotary foot rests & you could probably get 25 miles on
throttle only. I´ve 3300 mi. on mine, the only issues being tires & spokes because of my weight.
Not a problem for you. It´s currently $1059 from Leoncycles in seattle, but being a newbee, I´d
suggest spending the extra $300 on the Moscow+ since it has hydraulic brakes that do not
require regular adjustment as well as other upgrades. That 27.5 frame would best suit you.
Anyone inexperienced owning any ebike would benefit from studying maintenance tutorials
on Utube if only to gain a better understanding of how bikes work. You probably won´t be
working on your choice. A focus on rider safety is also very strongly advised; at our age
injury is not swift to mend. Whatever you get, take it slow & careful til you get the feel for it.
P.S. you might also look at the ´Aspen´ which is NCM´s fat tire versions of the Moscow
costing just a little more except when it comes to tires. The stock moscow tires would be
comfortable for you, stay away from cactus.
Your input is greatly appreciated. My sister, who lives in Holland and has been riding an ebike for quite some time, had a significant accident a couple years ago, so I am quite empathetically aware of the need for caution and rider safety. I do not expect to be riding in as busy an urban environment as she, thankfully.
 

rcdanner

Active Member
Unless you´re really uncomfortable with two wheels, this is a cheap, rugged, & powerful bike with
more range than you´ll probably ever need. The downside is that like any ebike. it does need
regular attention to maintenance. Itś a German bike in spite of the name, Moscow.(this outfit
names all it´s bikes for cities, guess they hoped to sell in Russia.) At 150 pds your knees are
covered; the pedals would practically be rotary foot rests & you could probably get 25 miles on
throttle only. I´ve 3300 mi. on mine, the only issues being tires & spokes because of my weight.
Not a problem for you. It´s currently $1059 from Leoncycles in seattle, but being a newbee, I´d
suggest spending the extra $300 on the Moscow+ since it has hydraulic brakes that do not
require regular adjustment as well as other upgrades. That 27.5 frame would best suit you.
Anyone inexperienced owning any ebike would benefit from studying maintenance tutorials
on Utube if only to gain a better understanding of how bikes work. You probably won´t be
working on your choice. A focus on rider safety is also very strongly advised; at our age
injury is not swift to mend. Whatever you get, take it slow & careful til you get the feel for it.
P.S. you might also look at the ´Aspen´ which is NCM´s fat tire versions of the Moscow
costing just a little more except when it comes to tires. The stock moscow tires would be
comfortable for you, stay away from cactus.
JohnPeck- Nice looking bike. I am concerned about the standover height of 30" as specified for 27.5 frame on leoncycle site. How high is yours measured about an inch forward of the top tube rise. Is it as high as 30"? Thanks for helping short legged riders out there.
 

Franco51

New Member
Region
USA
I do not know ANYTHING about bicycles, except how to ride an old fashioned one. I am looking for recommendations for an electric bike, which I could use to get smallish amounts of groceries, that can take hills, and possibly dirt/gravel roads. Am thinking about full-time RVing and want to be able to be mobile without a vehicle. I am 72 years old, weigh 150, and am reasonably fit...can walk 8 or more miles in one session on flat ground with no worries, can adjust to mountain elevations, but it takes a day or two. As my knees are somewhat arthritic, I don’t do hills very well. Either a bicycle or tricycle would be okay with me, but like the idea of a tricycle better. One with a fair amount of range seems like the best idea, as camping grounds can be a bit distant from fair-sized markets. Perhaps something that is “street legal”? Your recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

a transportable trike might be the Liberty etrike. Breaks down into two 25-lb halves with battery removed. Or will fold pretty small. Will fit easily under our small RV in storage bin. Only 25-in wide. Will carry large payload. 750w motor. Has throttle.

Top speed only 12mph. Not terribly long range. So it meets some of your criteria, not others.
 

ebiker76

New Member
Region
USA
I am 76 and have been riding a Blix Vika+ for 7 months. I understand your concern with selecting an ebike that fits your needs. By choice I don't own a car so use my ebike, the trolley and buses for transport. My considerations were weight, price, ease of mounting (on and off the ebike) and to some extent, looks. I wasn't aware of this forum, a great resource, but I did find Electric Bike Reviews. They have lists of recommendations and I simply read the reviews for ebikes that seemed to fit my requirements. It was their review of the Blix Vika+ that convinced me to buy. I did not test ride ebikes, which would have been easy for me living near San Diego and I think that is an excellent recommendation. In your shoes and knowing what I know now, I would read the reviews and advice from this forum and have an idea what I wanted and then visit a bike shop for test rides. Understand the local bike shop is not going to carry all brands, none in this area carry Blix for example, Blix only sells direct. They may not have the perfect ebike for you but you will get some feeling for what feels right through test rides. Finally, the Blix has a throttle and I don't know what I would do without that crossing busy streets in traffic with fast stoplights. I never considered whether a throttle was necessary or not but now I would never own an ebike without one. Good luck in your hunt!