A change of wheel size.......?

Nvreloader

Active Member
Region
USA
Well, here is the next chapter,
I changed seats again, back to the "No nose" Schwinn seat, kept the NCX seat stem, this allowed me to be able to slide/step down CLOSER to the seat post stem, gaining some more stand over height clearance, when stopping.

There is a 4" length difference (nose length) between these 2 seats,
when I tried the bike, the stand over height is right at 33",
(contact with the sloped bar) standing flat footed on the ground.

I am on my tippy toes when seated and feet touching the ground.
I gained just over 1"+, I loosen everything (Back rack/fender) and dropped the seat height about 1/4" shorter than before. (Don't laugh, every little bit helps).........LOL

I'll take a 8-10 mile ride, just at sunset, to see the final results, and report the results.

I am still looking for a 24" x 3.5-4.0-4.5" wide FRONT Wheel,
with the following spec's to fit my WH bike, 75/100mm rim width, 15mm axel size, 150mm hub spacing, will need a 203mm disc brake/with 6 hole bolt pattern.

WHERE can I find this fat tire wheel?

Your thoughts and suggestions............
Tia,
Don
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Being a lifelong cyclist, I can say I have never in my life felt I should be able to put my feet down on the ground while seated. To be able to do that would mean my legs while on the pedals and pedaling would be too long. A proper cycling pedal stroke - at the bottom of the stroke - should have my leg slightly bent and the ball of my feet not extended further down below the level of my heels. Not stretching my foot down in other words.

You can't sit on a bike saddle and put your feet on the ground if you've done the pedal stroke fitment right on the bike. The whole seated-and-planted thing is a common desire from motorcyclists as its natural and expected to be able to do that on that platform.

On a bicycle, you brake and then as you come to a stop you stand on the ground in front of the saddle (back in the day I could do the 'track stand' about 98% of the time which is balance while at a standstill while my feet were cleated into the pedals... not 100%; 98%).

This is why the 'standover' frame specification is so important as if the top tube is too high you give yourself a nutcracker every time you stop the bike. Standover is the #1 thing you have to measure and get right when sizing yourself for a bike frame. Nothing else matters as much.

If you have to plant your feet while seated, the way you have to do it is to throttle the bike so you can give up on your pedal stroke. Anything else and you will come up with one compromise after another that does the job wrong in a slightly different way.
 

prixat

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
There are some suspension-dropper posts around.
Though I'm still getting used to a (non-suspension) dropper post and keep forgetting to lower it when stopping! 🚲
 

m@Robertson

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
There are some suspension-dropper posts around.
I think there is only one combination suspension-and-dropper: The PNW Coast. I put one on my Apostate. I chose the external cabled version to be sure I kept clear of my rear shock.

PNW says this in their literature/advertising and it is absolutely true: These posts do not perform the same function as suspension posts. They are posts that ride solid and only take the edge of a hard knock. Thats it. It behaves nothing like a suspension post but it does perform its advertised big-hits-only function. I wanted to see if I could absorb a little of the give that would otherwise be transmitted to my mall and overworked rear shock (it worked and max travel was reduced).

PXL_20220526_161910855.jpg
 

Nvreloader

Active Member
Region
USA
Being a lifelong cyclist, I can say I have never in my life felt I should be able to put my feet down on the ground while seated. To be able to do that would mean my legs while on the pedals and pedaling would be too long. A proper cycling pedal stroke - at the bottom of the stroke - should have my leg slightly bent and the ball of my feet not extended further down below the level of my heels. Not stretching my foot down in other words.

You can't sit on a bike saddle and put your feet on the ground if you've done the pedal stroke fitment right on the bike. The whole seated-and-planted thing is a common desire from motorcyclists as its natural and expected to be able to do that on that platform.

On a bicycle, you brake and then as you come to a stop you stand on the ground in front of the saddle (back in the day I could do the 'track stand' about 98% of the time which is balance while at a standstill while my feet were cleated into the pedals... not 100%; 98%).

This is why the 'standover' frame specification is so important as if the top tube is too high you give yourself a nutcracker every time you stop the bike. Standover is the #1 thing you have to measure and get right when sizing yourself for a bike frame. Nothing else matters as much.

If you have to plant your feet while seated, the way you have to do it is to throttle the bike so you can give up on your pedal stroke. Anything else and you will come up with one compromise after another that does the job wrong in a slightly different way.
Matt
Thanks for the information, and I'll add some info to clarify,

"Being a lifelong cyclist, I can say I have never in my life felt I should be able to put my feet down on the ground while seated."

You would, if every time you dismounted the bike, you received a nutcracker from the high top bar. I have over 60,000+ miles on my trail 90 Honda, 99% of it off road, so it is just natural for me to plant/touch my feet on the ground, while seated.
I am after safety/comfort first.

"This is why the 'standover' frame specification is so important as if the top tube is too high you give yourself a nutcracker every time you stop the bike. Standover is the #1 thing you have to measure and get right when sizing yourself for a bike frame. Nothing else matters as much."

I agree 1000% with the stand over height being the #1 thing you have to measure and get right, and this is the reason for my post.
I carefully checked all the spec's on this bike before I bought it,
per Bikonit posted information, they stated that the stand over height was 29" in their diagram.
https://bikonit.com/collections/electric-mountain-bikes/products/bikonit-warthog-md750-ebike = check geometry/sizing spec's.

I bought the bike because everything was what I wanted, for a good trail bike etc. It was shipped and then HELD UP in Reno for over 30 days, due too the second shippers screw up, "(can't deliver until we have a full truck load going to Lovelock.")

By the time I finally went and picked my bike up, it was well past (30 days) for the return time of 15 days, per Bikonit's information etc.
So I was stuck with it, then I found out the stand over height was measured at 34+" where I contact the top bar, (I measure approximately 34" leg inseam/10" thru the hips, front to back. )
I carefully measured these measurements from my OEM bike w/26x4.5 tire@ 25psi, stand over heights of 29" right at the Jct of the top bar/seat stem tube, + 2" = 30.5", (going up the top bar), +4" = 31.5", +6" = 33", +8" =34.5" and +10" = 35.5".

Since that time I have been doing "workarounds" to reduce the fracture zone,
such as changing physical seat heights dimensions, nose dimensions of the seat, seat angle etc, etc, etc.
I don't have the funds to get another bike, at this time, with the medical problems that keep jumping up.

I have just about got the "REQUIRED" stand over height correct, (changing to the "NO Nose seat, gave me 4+" of room to slide back against the seat stem, but doesn't have the seat comfort of the Cloud 9 seat), but I would like another inch or so for more safety, if you follow along, especially when I am OFF ROAD riding cattle/feral horse trails, in steep rough country.

This is the reason I asked about the change of wheel size, and needed some questions answered to make sure I am headed in the right direction.
I have asked on several forums and have received limited information/or valid help,
as of this date, every thing is being discussed EXCEPT the questions I asked.

I don't believe that my questions are that hard to answer,
and would take less than a couple of minutes time wise, to answer these simple questions, for a 24" Fat tire wheel with 4.0 to 4.5" wide tire @ 25psi:

1. What is the total overall distance, from the ground level to the top of the highest lug, on the front tire, with the tire/bike standing upright 90* to the ground? (tire diameter).
2. What is the diameter of the rim, edge to edge? (measured thru the axle center).
3. What is the distance from ground level to the bottom edge of the rim,
with the tire/bike standing 90* to the ground?

I have had 1 answer that stated the total distance/diameter for a 24" Fat tire was 14",
and 3" side walls???
I don't think this information is VALID. 24" tire and 14" diameter??
Must have been a new metric system?? LOL

Thanks all,
Your thoughts and suggestions.........if you have a better plan for reducing this stand over height.
Tia,
Don
 

Nvreloader

Active Member
Region
USA
Has Bikecalc been mentioned yet?
You'll get some relative sizes, if not your specific size.

Prixat
Thank you, that information/site has NOT been brought up, until now.
I have that site saved for later use.

With a quick glance thru this info, it appears that I now,
can get a rough Idea for/as to the tire diameters between my 26"x4.5 tires/wheel and the 24" pending tire/wheels to get another 1" or so of stand over height safety etc.

Thank you,
I greatly appreciate this information, off to do some checking..........LOL
Tia,
Don
 

Nvreloader

Active Member
Region
USA
This combination of wheel/tires...results in these diameters (mm),
info from the above posted site. https://www.bikecalc.com/wheel_size_math#
↓
Rim ↓ Tire Rim ↓ Tire ↓ Wheel ↓ Circumference
26inch MTB4.50 inch559114.30787.602474.32 *
24inch MTB4.50 inch507114.30735.602310.96
24inch MTB4.60 inch507116.84740.682326.91
24inch MTB4.70 inch507119.38745.762342.87
24inch MTB4.80 inch507121.92750.842358.83
24inch MTB4.90 inch507124.46755.922374.79
* = my tire size
It appears that I can choose several different tire sizes, to get the combination I am looking for, to give the safety room needed or wanted for just a little bit more stand over height clearance..

Off to do some more research, those 24x4.90" tires look promising.........since I have 5.25" front fork clearance.
Tia,
Don
 

prixat

New Member
Region
United Kingdom
Think of a wheel as components; hub, spokes, rim and tire.
Any good cycle shop should be able to source the parts and build any wheel you specify.