A comparison between the Limited and the 700

I bought a R1U 700 in March of 2020, which got delivered in June 2020. Overall, its a good bike but I feel like I don't do any work at all when pedaling. I also wanted a second ebike, so that I could leave one at my place in FL, and decided to get a bike with a torque sensor. I also purchased a BH Emotion Atom Lynx 6 mountain bike from Crazy Eddie's which I received in May 2020. It is an excellent bike and sets the bar pretty high for the Chinese bikes. But a bike that nice also comes with a much higher price tag too! I want to make some comments on the Limited to help anyone considering it or the 700. I have about 140 miles on the Limited and over 500 miles on the 700 series bike and feel I've got enough experience with both to comment on them. I've got a few beefs with the Limited, so read on if it interests you.

The tires are the same Schwalbe Moto X 2.4” as the 700. However, on the 700 they measure 2.4” in width, but on the Limited they only measure 2.15” because they are mounted on a very narrow rim. They roll well and have the same flat protection, but they lose some of the visual heft that you get with the 700. Yes, the part number and size molded into the tire are exactly the same.

When I bought the Limited in late December 2020, the weight was listed as 51 pounds. They have since raised that weight to 53 pounds, but my bike was 54 pounds when I used a bathroom scale. I felt that this was pretty deceptive advertising, and it really irked me because I picked the Limited over another bike in part because it was lighter. I saw a video on Youtube by ebikeescape and he said his bike (first run) was 55 pounds 6 ounces. Wish I'd seen it before buying.

From the website description of the Limited - Powerful 1000w (peak) 750W (sustained) geared motor with 100nm torque . From the website description of the 700 - Powerful 800W (peak) 500W (sustained) geared motor with 56nm torque I think it is reasonable to conclude that the Limited has the stronger motor from those descriptions. But, having ridden both motors, I think the 700 motor feels noticeably stronger on acceleration. Additionally, when the Limited battery is partially discharged, it feels even slower. The 700 does not slow down as much when partially (half) discharged. Even the watt meter agrees with my thoughts – I've never seen 1000 watts on the meter of the Limited. The most I see is about 935 watts, and only rarely, and only with a full charge. Most of the time I see about 835 watts maximum. On the 700, with at least half charge, the watt meter will hit 999 watts whenever I hit the throttle. This was a big disappointment – I was really hoping that, with almost twice the torque, the Limited would feel noticeably stronger than the 700. Both bikes are set to 22 amps.

I think the 700 I have has a better made frame than the Limited. Most of the welds are smoothed over very well on the 700, but the welds on the Limited are pretty sloppy in many cases. There were also several nicks in the paint that looked like they were nicked, then painted over on the Limited.

That's most of my gripes with the bike. Now other, mostly positive comments.

The frame is a little bit smaller than the 700 XR. I'm 6' 0” with a 32' inseam and I have the seat post pretty high. It might go another inch or two higher. I have a Thudbuster LT that I use, but swap it between the two bikes (both 30.4 diameter), so its not a big deal to me. The Limited feels a little closer from seat to bars, probably in large part due to the shorter stem. I have a stem riser on both bikes since I want to sit upright when I ride. This is not a positive nor a negative – just mentioned in case it matters to anyone considering either bike.

The torque sensor may have gotten a bad rep from the first batch, but the one on my bike works very well. Its not as smooth as the one on my BH (which listed for 3x the price) with a Brose motor, but its fairly seamless and works the way I expected it to. Wanting a torque sensor was the #1 reason I bought this bike, so I'm happy with its performance. I can set it in level one and get assistance anywhere from 1 mph to 15+ mph. Level two and three do the same, just with more boost and higher speeds. Its easy to ride at any speed that I want, which I cannot say for the 700. The 700 (which I set for 9 levels) wants to go at a certain speed for each level and its hard to go any slower or faster than that speed. For instance, level 4 on the 700 may propel me at 15.5 mph on flat ground with a full battery (a little less as the battery drops) – if I want to go 16.5 mph it takes a LOT of work to go that extra mph. If I bump it to level 6, I will end up with 17.5 or 18 mph. Trying to match speeds with another rider is difficult on the 700; it is easy with the Limited. Plus for the Limited.

The Limited fork is decent to good for being a lower end fork with no damping. Real travel is probably two inches after the sag you get when you sit on the bike. Enough to remove a lot of road chatter. Bear in mind that my BH has a Rock Shox Yari, which has 6” of travel and costs $500-600 for the fork alone, so I'm spoiled. The RST on the Limited has a little stiction at times but usually moves freely. At 170 lbs, the fork needs about 95 psi to work properly. It has a small air chamber so it ramps up quickly compared to the Yari (160 mm travel with 55 psi). This is due to the smaller diameter stanchions (fork legs).

The gearing is pretty much spot on. Good range and you are not spinning like a wild man when doing 28+ mph. It also has a low enough gear to allow take off from a dead stop. Also, as an improvement on the 700 series, the chain line is just right.

It shifted well right out of the box. Yesterday I unscrewed the barrel adjuster near the handlebars one half twist to take a little slack out of the cable (new cables stretch ) and it shifts perfectly. Shimano is great stuff.

The brakes (or breaks, as some might write) are good to very good. A little wooden feeling at the lever, but they stop well while making minimal noise. They might become a little stronger as I get some more miles on them. I think the Shimano MT 200 brakes on the 700 feel a little better, but that might also be because I have over 500 miles on them and they are fully broken in.

The wheels – I don't know why they picked these rims. They are just way too narrow for a 2.4” tire. They are the kind of rim that should be on a 1.5” wide tire. However, the front wheel has a sealed bearing and they both were true out of the box and haven't developed any wobbles. There were no loose spokes. The nipple diameter is different than the 700 (which takes the blue Parks spoke tool).

Battery – Both are listed as 14 aH/48 volt. Perhaps its my imagination, but it seems that the Limited drops from peak voltage almost immediately. I charge both bikes until the light on the charger turns green, and they both claim 54.8 volts when topped out. The 700 holds 53-54 volts for a longer time than the Limited – I can go 6-10 miles and still be 53 volts on the 700. For instance, this afternoon I hopped on the Limited after having fully charged it yesterday and within 2 miles it was telling me that I was in the low 52 volt range.

Both bikes ride well and I can ride hands free for quite a bit of time on either one without it pulling to either side, including going through curves in the road.

On my 700 the controller limits the support to 25 mph or 40 kph. It will not allow me to raise the limit any higher. I traded some emails with support and they basically shrugged and said thats the way its designed (even though its listed as a 28 mph Class 3 bike). The Limited allows support to go to 31 mph and I've been able to get it there, but only with a pretty fresh battery. The throttle will assist to 28 (or maybe 31) mph if you are pedaling on the Limited.

The handlebars on the Limited are just a little bit narrow. What is bothersome about them is that with the rise to the bar, it leaves a limited amount of space to add things like a phone holder, lights, etc. The bar on the 700 is wider and a bit flatter and easier to add things. However, the 700 bar has almost no backsweep and is less comfortable on your wrists than the Limited. The grips on the Limited are superior to the 700 – ergo shape and rubber vs. the slippery vinyl grips on the 700. Ride on the beach in the summertime with no gloves and you will appreciate the rubber grips. Plus the rubber grips are clamp on, so they are easy to move/remove.

Thats all I can think of to comment on. I hope that all of these notes may help other buyers in the future.

Final note – I was very close to buying the Rize bike. For the same money (The Limited was $1699 in December, Rize is still $1699), I could have had a torque sensor bike with rack, fenders, lights and a 17 aH battery. I went for the R1U Limited because of the lighter weight (which was not accurate) and the stronger motor (which does not wow me). Perhaps the Rize bike stretches the truth on their specifications – I will not know since I don't have one in front of me to compare them. But, while mostly happy with the Limited (and the 700), I still wonder if I made the right choice on the Limited. Overall, I enjoy both bikes but I feel R1U over promises and under delivers. I like the other way around better.
 

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rchenail

Member
I bought my 700xr last year in March also ( came in late April ) and if I remember correctly it was listed at 1000 peak. Ride1Up changed that to 850 the next batch. It had an adjustable stem and cruise instead of the walk mode. The LMTD was not available at the time of purchase but I wouldn't have bought it even if it was. Your gripe for the 1lb difference...? Really? A bathroom scale is not what I would use... There could be so many variables over time...like accessories you added or not or you yourself gained or lost weight. I'm 5'6" 160lbs and in excellent condition compare that to a guy who's 220lb, overweight and in not great shape...again variables.
Would I buy it again? Maybe but Ride1Up 700 bikes are delivered with different specs over time. Some have larger seat tubes, walk mode instead of cruise, non adjustable stem then back to adjustable. There like a box of chocolates... you never know what you will get. Quality control seems was like the main issue with the controllers for a while also. I was lucky with my 700 so far. Assembled it myself and not worried at all with the warranty. The PAS levels and the tweeking of percentages is unique compared to other makes .
 
My gripe is not about one pound, it is about closer to four pounds. It was listed as 51 lbs when I purchased it in late December. My attempt to weigh it shows three pounds heavier, and ebikeescape said it was 55.4 pounds - a four and a half pound difference. That is a lot of difference - people pay $500 a pound to drop weight on higher end bikes. When I weighed the Limited I had just finished assembling it. There were no accessories on it at that time, not even Slime in the tires.
My 700 does 999 watts all the time when I hit the throttle. I don't have a problem with that, especially when it was advertised as less power. My problem is with the Limited - it is advertised as a 1000 watt bike and I've never seen more than 935 watts. Plus the torque is listed as 100 nm while the 700 series is listed as 56 nm. To me, the 700 has a lot more oomph to it when accelerating, while the numbers say just the opposite.
Again, they are good bikes overall but I feel that R1U should have more accuracy in their advertising. The weight change on the Limited is a step in the right direction.
And you are right about the specs changing all the time. You never know if what FedEx delivers is what you ordered. And it is expensive to box the bike up and return it. I wonder how many people that buy direct to consumer bikes would not have bought the bike if they had seen it in person before buying it.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Regarding the 700 maximum wattage, Kevin from Ride1Up said you can still set it to 1000 watts. It sounds like they just changed the default setting to prevent people from damaging the motor. I posted about that in this thread:
 
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GenXrider

Active Member
Its easy to ride at any speed that I want, which I cannot say for the 700. The 700 (which I set for 9 levels) wants to go at a certain speed for each level and its hard to go any slower or faster than that speed. For instance, level 4 on the 700 may propel me at 15.5 mph on flat ground with a full battery (a little less as the battery drops) – if I want to go 16.5 mph it takes a LOT of work to go that extra mph. If I bump it to level 6, I will end up with 17.5 or 18 mph. Trying to match speeds with another rider is difficult on the 700
That description sounds like the speed based PAS that we discussed in these threads, where power assist drops significantly or completely when the bike reaches a specific speed in a given assist level, therefore requiring a lot of effort to ride at any speed above that limit.

One mile per hour jump from 15.5 to 16.5 shouldn't take that much more muscle power unless the e-bike is dropping its amount of assistance due to hitting a speed limit, putting a lot more of the demand on the rider.

But in June 2020, Kevin of Ride1Up stated in an interview that they were moving from speed based to current/power based pedal assist, that will continue to provide a given amount of assist power at higher speeds rather than dropping power at a specific speed. I have bookmarked this video at the point in the video that he talks about it:


It sounds like you may have gotten an older model 700 that didn't yet incorporate the new pedal assist system that Kevin talked about in the interview. You could test that by ghost pedaling up to 15.5 mph again, then start pedaling with force to go the extra mph, and see if the power output level drops.

Does anyone else have a 700 that can test that?

@AHicks
 
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"It sounds like you may have gotten an older model 700 that didn't yet incorporate the new pedal assist system that Kevin talked about in the interview. You could test that by ghost pedaling up to 15.5 mph again, then start pedaling with force to go the extra mph, and see if the power output level drops."

GenX, next dry spell I will give that a try. What I know at this moment is that if I attempt to go faster than its native speed for each assist level, it is a lot of work. Bear in mind that I was doing as much as 160 miles in a month last summer on the mountain bike on single track trails. I have good leg strength. But that is part of the problem - each batch of bikes is different even though the website doesn't reflect that. As it stands, I own the bike and accept it for what it is, and enjoy riding it.

And by the way, the 700 hits 999 watts anytime I max out the throttle (at least when the battery is at least 48 volts or more). Its the Limited, which is advertised as a 1000 watt peak motor the won't break 935 watts. I know enough to only use the throttle for short bursts and not extended, continuous runs. Both bikes are set for 22 amps in the menu.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Those power readings from the LMT'D sound in line with what I've read from others in the FB group. It seems like their max readings were always well short of 1000, sometimes much lower when they were wanting more power. There were complaints there from some people that the 700 climbed hills faster than the LMT'D, having issues with the second gen LMT'D bikes that a replacement controller didn't always resolve. Anyway, thanks for the review - you hit on some things I hadn't seen mentioned before - most things I've read dozens of times over. I've been following these Ride1Up bike posts here and on FB since early last summer and am trying to decide between the LMT'D, 700, and Core-5 to purchase any day now. I don't really like the look of exposed batteries like the 500.

Speaking of those narrow rims on the LMT'D, this guy put a 3" tire on his LMT'D's front rim.
 
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GenXrider

Active Member
In your experience, is the LMTD motor noisier? I've definitely seen more complaints about motor noise with the LMT'D, and one person who had both the 700 and the LMTD mentioned that the 700 was much quieter. Yet, I have read complaints about the 700 motor being noisier than "other" cadence sensor bikes. I've heard the motor noise to some degree in different videos, but you can't judge by that compared to hearing it in person.
 
Off the top of my head I would say that the MXUS motor on the Limited is a little bit noisier. Neither are real quiet, nor are they annoyingly loud. Usually the wind noise is louder than the motor.

On the other hand, the Brose motor (with its belt driven mid drive motor) is almost silent.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Yes, those Brose motors are known for it. There's some more discussion about those in the Ride1Up mid-drive bike thread.
 
It sounds like you may have gotten an older model 700 that didn't yet incorporate the new pedal assist system that Kevin talked about in the interview. You could test that by ghost pedaling up to 15.5 mph again, then start pedaling with force to go the extra mph, and see if the power output level drops.

Does anyone else have a 700 that can test that?
I just got done with a ride and have some numbers for you.

The battery started at 48 volts and these numbers come with the voltage about 45-46 volts.

Level five (of nine) wants to push me at about 15.5 mph. (If the battery were fully charged, it would probably push me to about 17.5 mph.) Even with the battery over 50% depleted, if I had slowed down for an intersection (say 7-8 mph) and I were in level 5 and start pedaling the watt meter would should a quick blip to over 700 watts, then drop quickly to about 500 watts, then drop more as the speed increased. Once at 15.5 mph, the motor would be drawing about 150 watts as I pedaled and maintained that speed on level ground. Going down a hill it would drop to as little as 40 watts (as I exceeded 15.5 mph) and going up a hill it would start giving me 450-550 watts to try to maintain the 15.5 speed.

I rarely try to go faster than this native speed for each power level, because it feels like I'm dragging and anchor when I do. But, when I tried it once today, the motor was still getting 40-60 watts when I exceeded 15.5 mph in level five. So it doesn't cut off entirely, but 50 watts isn't going to do much more than counter the extra weight of the bike.

Overall, when it comes to the motor, I prefer the feel of the Limited. I like the torque sensor feel over the cadence sensor. However, I like the stronger surge I get from the 700 series when I goose the throttle over the more gentle surge I get from the Limited. A nice thing about the Limited is that it is much easier to hold higher speeds - like 25-30 mph - than it is on the 700, which stops assisting at 25 mph on my bike.

Hope this help you in your decision. And, if you are looking at the 700 and Limited, don't forget to look at the Rize bike (not the fat tire bike). It is very similar to a Limited, but has a rack, fenders, light, adjustable stem and comes in $100 cheaper. I have no idea if it really weighs 59 pounds like the website says, but if it does, that is probably about what a Limited would weigh with the extras on it. Plus the Rize has a 17 aH battery, which probably accounts for any last difference in weight.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Hope this help you in your decision. And, if you are looking at the 700 and Limited, don't forget to look at the Rize bike (not the fat tire bike). It is very similar to a Limited, but has a rack, fenders, light, adjustable stem and comes in $100 cheaper. I have no idea if it really weighs 59 pounds like the website says, but if it does, that is probably about what a Limited would weigh with the extras on it. Plus the Rize has a 17 aH battery, which probably accounts for any last difference in weight.
I ended up finalizing my decision and ordering the 700 a few days ago. It's in route and is estimated to arrive Friday.

I had considered the Rize when I was looking last year. There used to be a cadence sensor version of the Rize with a smaller battery back then, in addition to the torque sensor model with the larger battery.

Thanks for doing those tests and reporting back. Your test confirms what I was speculating earlier - that your 700 is using a speed based cadence sensor PAS system. It's dropping power way down when exceeding a set speed, just like the Espin Sport. Based on Kevin's interview above, the current 700's should work differently, maintaining a current output for a given PAS level rather than it varying the power in attempting to maintain a specific speed like a cruise control as you are experiencing. I'll be able to test that myself soon to see if that is indeed the case.

I've read reviews/comments from people saying they could ride 28 miles per hour, so I'll check that out also. That could be another difference with the newer electronics/software.
 
Glad that you made your decision and hope that your bike is shipped soon.

Yes, it does seem to target a set speed for each level. It is the main reason that it will be left in my condo in FL - in NC I have to adjust the assist level a lot more on our rolling hills than I have to in FL. The torque sensor Limited is much more useable here in NC. From what you describe about the new 700, it sounds like it would work better on hilly areas than my June 2020 shipment bike.

On my 700 the maximum supported speed in the menu is 25mph/40kph. The motor feels strong enough to easily handle 28 or 31 mph. If only I could jailbreak it!
 

GenXrider

Active Member
Thanks. Early this morning, it had already completed shipping half way across the country to a neighboring state and is still on track for a Friday delivery, but no guarantee.

I'll confirm if it works the way I understand it should work in the current generation and check the top speed. Someone on FB just posted that he got this 700 up to 28.5 mph max, but he said he was putting in a "solid effort" although not "everything he had". He posted a photo of his display showing "MAX mph" of 28.5.

Edit: I received my 700 this afternoon (Friday, March 5). I hope to have it together and working tomorrow afternoon.
 
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Jimmy666

Member
Thanks. Early this morning, it had already completed shipping half way across the country to a neighboring state and is still on track for a Friday delivery, but no guarantee.

I'll confirm if it works the way I understand it should work in the current generation and check the top speed. Someone on FB just posted that he got this 700 up to 28.5 mph max, but he said he was putting in a "solid effort" although not "everything he had". He posted a photo of his display showing "MAX mph" of 28.5.

Edit: I received my 700 this afternoon (Friday, March 5). I hope to have it together and working tomorrow afternoon.
So How was the first ride?
 

GenXrider

Active Member
So How was the first ride?
I put it together yesterday, but waited until today to ride it due to about 10 degree warmer temps today. I took a lot of little rides, but by late afternoon, I had put 21 miles on it. I spent some time just taking short rides getting the handlebars, grips, and saddle adjusted to my liking and spending some time seeing how it rides with zero assist before I ever used power. After that, I kept the assistance low most of the time running no more than 50 watts most of time, but I did a few throttle tests and did a short test stretch in each of the 9 assist levels as well as going up and down a few hills bumping up to about 110 watts assist. I rode my standard bike some also, and since I haven't been riding all winter, my legs are feeling a little worn down. I haven't charged the battery at all - it's still at 50% from the charge it came with, based on the default voltage settings, which are close to what Kevin from Ride1Up had posted on the FB group page before.

It certainly handles the bumps better than my Trek standard bike's 35c tires, but I think I would still like a suspension seat post like a Suntour. My standard bike has a factory one that isn't that good but probably helps a little. Anyway, after not riding in a while, I'm feeling a little sore from sitting on the bike.

I felt like my riding was more just testing, adjusting, and seeing how everything works and performs rather than just enjoying a ride, but my experience with the bike is pretty positive.

There weren't any big disappointments - pretty much as expected. One odd thing, which I had seen someone post a video of his LMTD display doing this on the FB page last year, is that if I adjust the current setting to a maximum of 18 for any PAS level, then exit out, change to another PAS level and back to the same PAS level again, then go back to the advanced settings, it shows the default current level for the PAS level again rather than what I set. So it looks like that's no longer adjustable in my version. Not a big deal for me as I think they are fine. The highest amp setting was 18, and it showed that high only in level 9. The power levels adjust and keep the settings I make, which is what really matters. Based on some other posts, I was expecting that throttle-only would get me up to about 20 to 22 mph before it cuts out, but I was getting up around 27, 28 mph with throttle only, not moving the pedals. Not something that matters to me as I expect to use throttle & PAS power minimally, mostly to help with hills and headwinds, and I ride closer to 15 mph average since I'm just riding for exercise, not in a hurry to get anywhere. I want my battery to last as I sometimes take some pretty long rides, taking some over 60 miles last year on my Trek standard hybrid bike.
 
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GenXrider

Active Member
Level five (of nine) wants to push me at about 15.5 mph. (If the battery were fully charged, it would probably push me to about 17.5 mph.) Even with the battery over 50% depleted, if I had slowed down for an intersection (say 7-8 mph) and I were in level 5 and start pedaling the watt meter would should a quick blip to over 700 watts, then drop quickly to about 500 watts, then drop more as the speed increased. Once at 15.5 mph, the motor would be drawing about 150 watts as I pedaled and maintained that speed on level ground. Going down a hill it would drop to as little as 40 watts (as I exceeded 15.5 mph) and going up a hill it would start giving me 450-550 watts to try to maintain the 15.5 speed.

I rarely try to go faster than this native speed for each power level, because it feels like I'm dragging and anchor when I do. But, when I tried it once today, the motor was still getting 40-60 watts when I exceeded 15.5 mph in level five. So it doesn't cut off entirely, but 50 watts isn't going to do much more than counter the extra weight of the bike.
As expected, my new 700 works very differently with its PAS. It doesn't reduce power at a certain speed (except at the legal 28 mph limit), it doesn't decrease power when going down a hill, it doesn't increase power when going up a hill, and there's no blip of higher power when starting out. The power was in a certain range and did not deviate outside of that range under various riding conditions and speeds using a given PAS level. So, it looks like what I'm seeing is exactly the change Kevin of Ride1Up spoke about in the interview regarding moving from a speed to current based PAS.
 

GenXrider

Active Member
On my 700 the maximum supported speed in the menu is 25mph/40kph. The motor feels strong enough to easily handle 28 or 31 mph. If only I could jailbreak it!
On my KD218 display, when I first checked the speed limit, it showed 20 mph, but I changed it to 28. And in my testing I was able to get up to 28 mph before PAS started to drop.

So, for a few of the differences between our 700's of different generations:

You said your amps were set to 22. I can't change my current (amps) higher than 18, and even if I do change it for any PAS level, it ends up setting itself back to the default. For level 9, the setting is 18 amps, and it's something less than that for every other PAS level.

You mentioned that your throttle gave you 999 watts with at least half a charge of the battery. My battery was at about 75%, and my throttle gave about 768 watts. I tried it a couple times, and it was in that range, never near 900.

You mentioned a top speed of 25. Using throttle only, with the pedals stationary, my bike went up to 28 mph and 27 mph in a couple tests performed at different battery levels on somewhat flat roads.

You mentioned a top speed of 25. Using PAS 9 with it set to 100%, and pedaling, my power hit about 992 watts. That's the highest power I saw from it since the throttle didn't go that high. And it would go up to 28 mph. I used it briefly just for testing.

The way the PAS works on this one makes it easier to match speeds riding with someone else because the bike maintains a consistent power while pedaling rather than adjusting its power to try to maintain a predefined speed, although it's not as slick as the LMTD. On my 700, you may need to change your PAS level as well outside of a certain range of speed that you're able to maintain with added muscle power.
 
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Limeybastard

Member
Region
USA
City
Florida Unfortunately.
On my KD218 display, when I first checked the speed limit, it showed 20 mph, but I changed it to 28. And in my testing I was able to get up to 28 mph before PAS started to drop.

So, for a few of the differences between our 700's of different generations:

You said your amps were set to 22. I can't change my current (amps) higher than 18, and even if I do change it for any PAS level, it ends up setting itself back to the default. For level 9, the setting is 18 amps, and it's something less than that for every other PAS level.

You mentioned that your throttle gave you 999 watts with at least half a charge of the battery. My battery was at about 75%, and my throttle gave about 768 watts. I tried it a couple times, and it was in that range, never near 900.

You mentioned a top speed of 25. Using throttle only, with the pedals stationary, my bike went up to 28 mph and 27 mph in a couple tests performed at different battery levels on somewhat flat roads.

You mentioned a top speed of 25. Using PAS 9 with it set to 100%, and pedaling, my power hit about 992 watts. That's the highest power I saw from it since the throttle didn't go that high. And it would go up to 28 mph. I used it briefly just for testing.

The way the PAS works on this one makes it easier to match speeds riding with someone else because the bike maintains a consistent power while pedaling rather than adjusting its power to try to maintain a predefined speed, although it's not as slick as the LMTD. On my 700, you may need to change your PAS level as well outside of a certain range of speed that you're able to maintain with added muscle power.
I am assuming the revisions on the 700 you were riding included those that were listed on the official website, I think the bike stand is also relocated now?
 

GenXrider

Active Member
I am assuming the revisions on the 700 you were riding included those that were listed on the official website, I think the bike stand is also relocated now?
Yes, although they are only selling the current generation unless you buy a used or returned one. Yes, in all new models of the 700 going back well over a month, the kickstand is mounted toward the rear. I received mine over a month ago, and the kickstand is mounted to the rear. I had posted some pictures of the XR and ST in both colors with the rear mounted kickstands in another thread here a while back.
 
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