A continuing Saga with a defective SRAM fork, a new Como 5.0, and zero progress

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
True, but it is something that has to be "authorized" by Specialized, as it is not an item that is covered by them, so they say. It rests with SRAM to resolve, I am told.
surely you can pay for a fork in order to have your bike working for the next 6-9 months? then sell it once the warranty fix comes in, it’ll be a loss of $100 or something.
 

GuruUno

Well-Known Member
surely you can pay for a fork in order to have your bike working for the next 6-9 months?
Absolutely. But why should I have to?
I have a 2022 Vado 5.0 that I absolutely love. I got it shortly after I got the Como.
I don't really care about the Como (my donor bike) and would like to sell it (it is for sale). It was an experiment for me and I decided I'd rather have a Vado.
However, it is not "saleable" in its original form without its OEM fork, and any potential purchaser would surely question the validity of the issue or offer me next to nothing with non-standard replacement parts that I'm not able to procure via the SRAM or Specialized people.
So, just because I don't use the bike, and allowed it to be a donor for the fork to be put into my wife's bike so she would not be bikeless doesn't mean that there is no urgency or that I should invest more money to have it be saleable.
So, if a replacement fork was available for my wife's Medium Como, and my Large Como fork was returned to my bike, it would be whole again, and I could sell it without issue.
And it's my fork, in her bike, my bike without a fork, my bike I don't need, her bike she loves and wants to keep.
You can see the complexity here, right?
It is a tough situation, especially when you look at the Specialized website and there are zero Como's available, but in stock at some bike shops in the country.
Some have suggested that I should buy one, swap the fork, and then give it back and say I don't want it or like it (30-day return policy).
Of course, I would not do that, but the ridiculousness of this saga is Specialized gives 2 shixs and SRAM has no idea if/when any parts will ever be available.
SRAM has hinted that after 6 months they may offer to "buy me out" after I suggested that, but it's a nobody knows game as far as I can tell.
The end story is hey, anyone buying a Specialized bike with them offloading responsibility to 3rd party suppliers is a problematic issue, especially if legal avenues wish to be taken (no lawsuits permitted, only 'arbitration', and we all know how that works).
The BIG PICTURE is....what about all the poor souls who have Como's, Vado's with no parts available, and possibly for the long term/foreseeable future? What does THAT say about a company's reputation to resolve things of this nature in difficult times like this?
It's not about the money, it's all about the lack of caring by the parties that make the bikes and supply the parts.
Then think of this. Say a new fork is finally procured say in 6-7 months, and the bikes are put back to normal. What kind of nightmare rectification procedure is it going to take to get the original warranties extended while it sat for 1/2 a year or more, or will they say go scrub a rubber duck? Not to mention the value. Or possibly the discontinuance of the product making it a 1-year white elephant.
Lots and lots and lots of real issues, questions, etc., that can all be easily solved if somebody in executive management would step up to the plate and own it.
 

mschwett

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Absolutely. But why should I have to?
….

because you bought a bike (like any bike) which has third party components warranted by the third party, and we’re 2.5 years into a global pandemic which has disrupted supply and production around the world, and the manufacturer isn’t obligated to force SRAM to give you a new fork faster, and you haven’t built a positive enough relationship with your LBS that they’ll give you an interim solution gratis.

i bought an s-works aethos a while back, right when 12 speed dura-ace became available. had a minor issue with the rear caliper. brought it in, was very worried the solution would require a new rear shimano dura ace 12 speed caliper, which was/is unobtanium in any reasonable time frame. shop told me “do not worry, we will get your bike working, maybe we’ll have to temporarily swap another type of caliper or repair this one with adapted parts or replace seals with seals from another one.” they went above and beyond because i treat them well, understand that “perfection” is not the standard of care in ANY industry, and am always open and honest with them.

or, i could have immediately started ranted and firing off nasty emails, phone calls, forum posts, epithets about “rider care” because my brand new $$,$$$ bike HAD A PROBLEM and they couldn’t guarantee an instant perfect fix.
 

GuruUno

Well-Known Member
SRAM specs for the Como/Vado fork are:
WHEEL SIZE27.5"
TRAVEL (MM)80mm
STEERER1.5" Tapered
AXLE15x110mm BOOST™
FORK OFFSET42mm (27.5")
FENDER COMPATIBILITY

FULL 3 POINT MOUNT

MOST IMPORTANT SPEC IS FULL 3 POINT MOUNT
 

GuruUno

Well-Known Member
The specs for the shock in the link above are:
TRAVEL (MM)100mm, 120mm, 130mm, 140mm, 150mm
Compared to:
2022 Vado 5.0 SR Suntour NCX E25, 50mm of travel
I was informed by SRAM that Specialized has "OK'ed" a maximum of 100mm from the OEM 80mm as maximum, without it affecting the geometry of the Como.
 
Why don’t you just sue the LBS that sold you the defective product? They are liable as a product seller. Let them fight it out with the manufacture and SRAM. They have insurance for this. You have been more than reasonable.