A Road-Cyclist Thoughts On E-Bikes

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
My brother and I spoke with road-cyclist Marcin we made friends with on a long and steep mountain ride. Marcin expressed his thoughts on e-bikes:
  1. Many people just can't ride traditional bikes. E-bikes gave them a new life;
  2. Wifes often don't ride together with their husbands because they feel weaker physically. Once the husband bought an e-bike to his wife, he often considers e-bike purchase for himself.
  3. And when someone has spent money that could buy a car instead, it's such a waste not to ride the e-bike! As it is so much fun, e-bikes are ridden more frequently than traditional bikes.
Notice these words were expressed by a road cyclist who might be upset we were overtaking him uphill regularly. Yet the guy was reasonable, pleasant, and thinking. He didn't mind someone else having fun from riding just different type of bike. And he was completely unbiased.

My brother (who actually needs no e-bike but rides them anyway) told me later:
— The whole fun of mountain road-cycling is the downhill ride. Why to suffer on the ascent at all?!

Thoughts?
 

Grabags

New Member
I’m pleased that everyone puts in some pedal power here in the UK, with no throttles. I prefer to feel like I’ve put in the effort on my rides, using the gears efficiently before calling on the added Bosch assistance greater than Eco.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
I would consider myself a bit more of a traditional cyclist than an ebiker. I would say I'm both, but I have not ridden either of my electric bikes in roughly a month. I have been riding my mountain bike, Rocky Mountain Altitude, and my carbon road, Cervelo exclusively recently.

Perhaps my perspective is different than other road cyclists because I own two electric bikes. But obviously I'm fine with them. In our riding group, one of the fellows has an electric hybrid and it allows him to join us. If he didn't have the motor assistance he doesn't think he'd keep up with our group. So obviously it's a great thing that allows him to join us.

Having said that I don't like the scooters that have non-functional pedals on them. I don't like how people sit there not pedaling but use the bike lanes. If they want to use them to get around then fine, but I just don't think they should be permitted to use the bike lane.
 

WattsUpDude

Active Member
I'm of the mentality that "one less car" is better. And I actually like to drive...just not for my commute. I'm pretty welcoming to all the alternatives to cars whether they be analog bikes, ebikes or dorky escooters. They take up much less space and are all less likely to kill me if I'm hit by them. As long as I get overtaken with a nice 3 foot distance, I'm not going to be annoyed at all.
 

Roxlimn

Member
My main problem with ebikes is road ebikes. And my main problem with road ebikes is that they haven't made one that would cater to me personally, yet. I'm glad the road ebikes right now are apparently catering to the needs and wants of many people, but I'm still waiting on that elusive one.

I don't need an assist up to 25 kph. I can ride that fast already, even up slight inclines. Most of my time riding is spent upwards of 25 kph up to about 45 kph. I want a bike that will feel "normal" from 25-45 kph but will also help me up hills because sometimes I hate climbing. And yes, I'd like a bit of suspension and storage on the bike - fenders, too.

I already have an EMTB. I would just like the stuff I like on my EMTB on a fast roadie.

I believe this sentiment has also been voiced by riders on GCN - even up to 20 mph would be reasonable to get that ebike in as a commuter vehicle. Indeed, my own EMTB does 20 kph and it's great for that. But I still want a an electric roadie with all the trimmings. I'm okay with registration and licensing.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
My main problem with ebikes is road ebikes. And my main problem with road ebikes is that they haven't made one that would cater to me personally, yet. I'm glad the road ebikes right now are apparently catering to the needs and wants of many people, but I'm still waiting on that elusive one.

I don't need an assist up to 25 kph. I can ride that fast already, even up slight inclines. Most of my time riding is spent upwards of 25 kph up to about 45 kph. I want a bike that will feel "normal" from 25-45 kph but will also help me up hills because sometimes I hate climbing. And yes, I'd like a bit of suspension and storage on the bike - fenders, too.

I already have an EMTB. I would just like the stuff I like on my EMTB on a fast roadie.

I believe this sentiment has also been voiced by riders on GCN - even up to 20 mph would be reasonable to get that ebike in as a commuter vehicle. Indeed, my own EMTB does 20 kph and it's great for that. But I still want a an electric roadie with all the trimmings. I'm okay with registration and licensing.
I can perfectly understand your feelings!
 

WattsUpDude

Active Member
My main problem with ebikes is road ebikes. And my main problem with road ebikes is that they haven't made one that would cater to me personally, yet. I'm glad the road ebikes right now are apparently catering to the needs and wants of many people, but I'm still waiting on that elusive one.

I don't need an assist up to 25 kph. I can ride that fast already, even up slight inclines. Most of my time riding is spent upwards of 25 kph up to about 45 kph. I want a bike that will feel "normal" from 25-45 kph but will also help me up hills because sometimes I hate climbing. And yes, I'd like a bit of suspension and storage on the bike - fenders, too.

I already have an EMTB. I would just like the stuff I like on my EMTB on a fast roadie.

I believe this sentiment has also been voiced by riders on GCN - even up to 20 mph would be reasonable to get that ebike in as a commuter vehicle. Indeed, my own EMTB does 20 kph and it's great for that. But I still want a an electric roadie with all the trimmings. I'm okay with registration and licensing.


Have you met Cannondale Topstone Neo Lefty? Definitely one of my dream bikes. It comes very close to what you want. The only thing that I find missing is class 3 speeds from the motor.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
I've had my Creo for half a year now and I've enjoyed it, but I've actually gone back to riding my Cervelo most of the time. Nothing wrong with the Creo, I just felt like I wasn't getting the workout I wanted on the Creo. Sure you can push yourself on the Creo just as hard, but when your ride companions are on regular bikes that doesn't work or you're riding by yourself. But the Creo has that tiny bit of suspension built into the stem, has provisions for a rack and fenders.

I thought range might be an issue with such a small battery but it hasn't. In fact I've never even come close to using a full charge, even on a 122 km ride. It has been great and delivered on all its' promises, but I am actually thinking of selling it.

The group I ride with is pretty social and we ride slowly. There's really no need for a motor on these rides and my Cervelo rides slightly nicer but more importantly is an older bike not worth that much. So when we stop to eat I don't really worry about my Cervelo getting stolen. I've gotten lots of use out of it, not worth a ton. Of course I don't want it getting stolen, but if it did well I'd just buy a new bike. The Creo OTOH is worth a lot more and I worry about it a lot more.
 

Captain Slow

Well-Known Member
Deacon, I forgot to comment. So you finally pulled the trigger. Congratulations, I'm sure you'll have a lot of fun on the bike. Whenever the pandemic ends, I'd love to try and ride together if I get over to the island.
 

Deacon Blues

Well-Known Member
Deacon, I forgot to comment. So you finally pulled the trigger. Congratulations, I'm sure you'll have a lot of fun on the bike. Whenever the pandemic ends, I'd love to try and ride together if I get over to the island.

We were RVing in Victoria last week and I made the mistake of visiting a bike store that sold Cannondale and happened to have a Lefty 3 in stock. It was too big for me (large, while I ride a medium), but I they put the seat down and I went for a ride anyways. After some wheeling and dealing (got both taxes taken off) I ordered the bike.
 

Roxlimn

Member
Have you met Cannondale Topstone Neo Lefty? Definitely one of my dream bikes. It comes very close to what you want. The only thing that I find missing is class 3 speeds from the motor.

I'm definitely keeping an eye on the space and the Topstone is very close. I'm hoping the new Revolt E 2021 line from Giant will have a speed pedelec version that I can acquire. That would be the thing - not as much suspension, but more assist on the top end where it really matters. But really, I'd love for Niner to put an assistive motor on an MCR. That feels like it'd work so well. Availability is key as well. We get Giant ebikes in Manila, but Cannondale doesn't seem to want to put in ebikes here. And $9000 is a bit out of my budget, haha.
 
My brother and I spoke with road-cyclist Marcin we made friends with on a long and steep mountain ride. Marcin expressed his thoughts on e-bikes:
  1. Many people just can't ride traditional bikes. E-bikes gave them a new life;
  2. Wifes often don't ride together with their husbands because they feel weaker physically. Once the husband bought an e-bike to his wife, he often considers e-bike purchase for himself.
  3. And when someone has spent money that could buy a car instead, it's such a waste not to ride the e-bike! As it is so much fun, e-bikes are ridden more frequently than traditional bikes.
Notice these words were expressed by a road cyclist who might be upset we were overtaking him uphill regularly. Yet the guy was reasonable, pleasant, and thinking. He didn't mind someone else having fun from riding just different type of bike. And he was completely unbiased.

My brother (who actually needs no e-bike but rides them anyway) told me later:
— The whole fun of mountain road-cycling is the downhill ride. Why to suffer on the ascent at all?!

Thoughts?
No. 2 is definitely me, except it is a bit sexist - my wife bought her own e-bike, I tried it and I loved it so I bought one too! :)
 

DouglasB

Active Member
AT 73 and 69 my wife and I are die hard road cyclists, with a couple of carbon fiber clip in road bikes. We purchased two Canondale ebikes a year and a half ago and although we enjoy riding them, it is hard to find time for them and the road bikes as well. People will say, "you can get just as good of a workout on an ebike by turning the assist level down" but it's not the same. There's also something about being under your own power on an ultra light, fast road bike. Ebikes can be thrilling but not in the same way.
 

AleksR

Active Member
My main problem with ebikes is road ebikes. And my main problem with road ebikes is that they haven't made one that would cater to me personally, yet. I'm glad the road ebikes right now are apparently catering to the needs and wants of many people, but I'm still waiting on that elusive one.

I don't need an assist up to 25 kph. I can ride that fast already, even up slight inclines. Most of my time riding is spent upwards of 25 kph up to about 45 kph. I want a bike that will feel "normal" from 25-45 kph but will also help me up hills because sometimes I hate climbing. And yes, I'd like a bit of suspension and storage on the bike - fenders, too.

I already have an EMTB. I would just like the stuff I like on my EMTB on a fast roadie.

I believe this sentiment has also been voiced by riders on GCN - even up to 20 mph would be reasonable to get that ebike in as a commuter vehicle. Indeed, my own EMTB does 20 kph and it's great for that. But I still want a an electric roadie with all the trimmings. I'm okay with registration and licensing.

You can turn off the assist on the ebike and use it when you need it.
 

Buckdubay

Active Member
I pedaled my road bike 1500 to 2500 miles a year from the time I was 35 yrs until 49 yrs. At 49 I torn my ACL and meniscus, that took all the fun out of road cycling. On a road bike you want to go fast and cover mileage. Puttering around on a road bike ride 10-15 miles slow is not fun and depressing. My gravel ebike has put the fun back in riding. It has the drop handlebars (which I do use as intended) and the add benefit of bigger tires. The tires are more stable, comfortable and give me the ability to ride more terrain. I have not had this much fun on a bike since the mid eighties when I spent 3 paychecks from my summer job on a mountain bike. So I guess I fall into category 1 of the list. However injuries brought me to ebikes, but the versatility of an ebike has opened up many more interesting cycling opportunities for me to experience.
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
For many years i was a racer in Us . I'm still a roadie, an ebiker, escooterer, jetskier, skier, swimmer, runner, diver and a few others...

It mostly has to do with what particular experiences that person has been exposed too. An open minded person digs them and might also have one at home for rest days.

They are using them in the pro teams on recovery days. The Creo\Domane.

I know many cyclists only do cycling , have a compromised immune system most of the year , extremely weak upper body(as in 5-6push ups..) . and bad flexibility. And haven't ridden an ebike and have zero knowledge of what PAS is and how it works. Add to that a big ego and they may not have a positive view towards @Ebiker01 on an ebike or other people ebiking.
 

Roxlimn

Member
You can turn off the assist on the ebike and use it when you need it.

Yes. The main problem with most ebikes (even e-road bikes) is that they DON'T feel normal when the motor is off. They feel sluggish and heavy. This is okay for when you want to go real slow, but not when you just want to ride semi-normally. You want a minimum assist mode that only just compensates for the weight, but also assists me up to the speed I might normally ride (which is higher than 20 mph). It is quite nice to have a bike that rides well unpowered, but that's not the point here.