A tale of woe on a rainy day...

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
Well, I've been running on Schwalbe Hurricane tires these last two months, and have about 1400 miles on them. About two weeks ago I started developing a very slow leak in the rear tire. Again, this was a very slow leak and basically meant I had to pump up the tire (from about 30 psi to 40psi) every three or four days.

Well, yesterday it was a rainy day and I decided to heck with it I might as well fix the damned thing and see why it is leaking.

Boy was that a mistake. Getting the rear wheel off was easy-peasy (although slightly complicated by the fact that the quick release and rohloff cable retention bolt were very tight). However, after about 45 minutes of struggle I wasn't having any luck getting the bike tire off! It was wicked tight, in fact so tight I suspect that the reason the leak was so slow was that the tire was holding air even without the tube.

So I threw it in the back of my truck and drove to the LBS. They took one look at it and set it on the ground and stepped on the tire and the bead popped off.

After that it was again easy-peasy getting the tube out, replacing it, and popping the tire back on. In fact the tire bead easily made it over the rim on the first try (usually for these tight tires it takes me five or six tries to get the tire back on). Pumped it up and I was good to go.

So the lesson here is that these newfangled tires are wicked tight and you need to stand on the tire to get it off the rim, usually with quite a bit of leverage.

Seems like the Tubolito tube was leaking at the valve stem. The leak is extremely slow.
 

john peck

Well-Known Member
Well, I've been running on Schwalbe Hurricane tires these last two months, and have about 1400 miles on them. About two weeks ago I started developing a very slow leak in the rear tire. Again, this was a very slow leak and basically meant I had to pump up the tire (from about 30 psi to 40psi) every three or four days.

Well, yesterday it was a rainy day and I decided to heck with it I might as well fix the damned thing and see why it is leaking.

Boy was that a mistake. Getting the rear wheel off was easy-peasy (although slightly complicated by the fact that the quick release and rohloff cable retention bolt were very tight). However, after about 45 minutes of struggle I wasn't having any luck getting the bike tire off! It was wicked tight, in fact so tight I suspect that the reason the leak was so slow was that the tire was holding air even without the tube.

So I threw it in the back of my truck and drove to the LBS. They took one look at it and set it on the ground and stepped on the tire and the bead popped off.

After that it was again easy-peasy getting the tube out, replacing it, and popping the tire back on. In fact the tire bead easily made it over the rim on the first try (usually for these tight tires it takes me five or six tries to get the tire back on). Pumped it up and I was good to go.

So the lesson here is that these newfangled tires are wicked tight and you need to stand on the tire to get it off the rim, usually with quite a bit of leverage.

Seems like the Tubolito tube was leaking at the valve stem. The leak is extremely slow.
Have had similar experience with ´valve bleed´, that nebulous leak you can never find. Some valve cores can be microscopically
deformed. I pull the core & replace it with one from an old tube & crank it home with just a dab of Threadlock blue.
 

indianajo

Well-Known Member
Well, I've been running on Schwalbe Hurricane tires these last two month

the LBS. They took one look at it and set it on the ground and stepped on the tire and the bead popped off.

So the lesson here is that these newfangled tires are wicked tight and you need to stand on the tire to get it off the rim, usually with quite a bit of leverage.
A tire that I can't change by the side of the road in the pouring rain is less than useless. It's a 15 mile walk from the middle of my commute to either end, and 4 more miles to the LBS from only the city end. Else 34 miles from the summer camp end. I can walk the 4 city miles faster than the bus can get me there. 2 transfers.
 

Mr. Coffee

Well-Known Member
A tire that I can't change by the side of the road in the pouring rain is less than useless. It's a 15 mile walk from the middle of my commute to either end, and 4 more miles to the LBS from only the city end. Else 34 miles from the summer camp end. I can walk the 4 city miles faster than the bus can get me there. 2 transfers.

I worked out how to get the tire off, so all is well. Just something to watch out for.