Advice for older man wanting to get back on the trails

phoenixtoohot

Active Member
Both look like great tires, probably can't go wrong with either for all terrain. It does look like the Smart Sam has a single, continuous bead around the middle, which makes me think it might be a bit better on pavement than the Smart Plus where the center is more of an s pattern ?

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GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
Assuming your just wanting a single track experience at brisk hiking speeds or even 7-8mph, my $800 Ecotric 26" fattie works fine. I air down if its really rutted out. @richc is right about slow handling, even more so if you add suspension forks that effect rake and trail ( the add-on forks are forward of the stem). You mentioned maybe 200 miles a year of "trail". As far as start stop lag or jolt, due to hub drive, it's nothing in PAS1. The perfect mode for single track in 6th and 7th gear. Range 25+ on a 36v 500w setup. I think my battery is 13.5 AH. I have also considered another acoustic bike (gravel) because riding my eBike has actually increased my stamina and I want to do some "bikepacking" without the hassel of charging. Anyway good luck on finding a nice trailbike
 

phoenixtoohot

Active Member
Well, as the OP, I wanted to thank each of you for the comments and suggestions, and perhaps close out this thread. I rented a non-electric MTB today for $30, and tried it out on my usual fitness loop. At the first hill, I realized why I sold all my regular bikes and purchased an e-bike, LOL. I have to say that, for me, the acoustic MTB took all the fun out of my ride, and made me realize how much fun the e-bikes are.

Anyway, I ordered Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB tires and some larger platform pedals that I will install on my Ride1up 500. I think these changes, along with lowering the tire pressure, will suit me just fine for some easier trail riding that I want to do. p.s., Stefan, I looked for the Schwalbe Smart Sams, but could find none for sale here in the U.S.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Well, as the OP, I wanted to thank each of you for the comments and suggestions, and perhaps close out this thread. I rented a non-electric MTB today for $30, and tried it out on my usual fitness loop. At the first hill, I realized why I sold all my regular bikes and purchased an e-bike, LOL. I have to say that, for me, the acoustic MTB took all the fun out of my ride, and made me realize how much fun the e-bikes are.

Anyway, I ordered Schwalbe Marathon Plus MTB tires and some larger platform pedals that I will install on my Ride1up 500. I think these changes, along with lowering the tire pressure, will suit me just fine for some easier trail riding that I want to do. p.s., Stefan, I looked for the Schwalbe Smart Sams, but could find none for sale here in the U.S.

Let us know how the 500 does in those conditions!
 

phoenixtoohot

Active Member
The all terrain tires (Schwab Marathon Plus 27.5x2.25) and larger platform pedals made the difference for me. 🙂 I was able to do the trail shown below, which I was not comfortable with before the changes. (The Kenda Kwick Seven.5 (27.5"x2.2) tires that came with my Ride1up 500 look smaller in the picture than they are because they are not inflated. The Kenda's are great, and I have 1100 miles on them, with no flats, but I wanted to do some easy trails.)

I could not tell any change on pavement with the Marathons, which is a good thing, because the Kenda's are great on pavement and hard pack. In loose sand over packed dirt I could feel much better traction, and on the trails, I am happy with the change. P.S. This is the first time I removed the rear wheel on an e-bike. Getting if off was easy, getting it back on was a challenge !

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GypsyTreker

Well-Known Member
Great that the tires and platforms ( have a similar pair on my fattie) saved you the $ a new bike would have cost. In fact improving the bike one already owns might be the cheaper, more pragmatic solution.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Regarding the rear tire swap, reintalling that hub motor will get easier and easier each time you do it. Congrats on having the wherewithal to give it a shot.... -Al
 

ned37

New Member
the wife and i did the prescott peavine trail on 10/3. i was on my diy 1000w hub motor converted '96 proflex mtb,
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and she was on her ride1up core5. she didn't want to do the smaller hiking trails since it was her first time off asphalt. maybe next time. i was struck by how "unfriendly" people on the trail were. i waved or nodded to everybody walking or riding (we were the only ebikes i saw), and only two people waved back.??
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
The all terrain tires (Schwab Marathon Plus 27.5x2.25) and larger platform pedals made the difference for me. 🙂 I was able to do the trail shown below, which I was not comfortable with before the changes. (The Kenda Kwick Seven.5 (27.5"x2.2) tires that came with my Ride1up 500 look smaller in the picture than they are because they are not inflated. The Kenda's are great, and I have 1100 miles on them, with no flats, but I wanted to do some easy trails.)

I could not tell any change on pavement with the Marathons, which is a good thing, because the Kenda's are great on pavement and hard pack. In loose sand over packed dirt I could feel much better traction, and on the trails, I am happy with the change. P.S. This is the first time I removed the rear wheel on an e-bike. Getting if off was easy, getting it back on was a challenge !

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Congratulations on the new shoes! ;)

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phoenixtoohot

Active Member
the wife and i did the prescott peavine trail on 10/3. i was on my diy 1000w hub motor converted '96 proflex mtb, View attachment 69299 and she was on her ride1up core5. she didn't want to do the smaller hiking trails since it was her first time off asphalt. maybe next time. i was struck by how "unfriendly" people on the trail were. i waved or nodded to everybody walking or riding (we were the only ebikes i saw), and only two people waved back.??
I ride that trail 3 to 4 times per week as part of a 15 mile fitness loop. I notice that a lot of people don't seem very friendly either. I think a lot of the bikers are perhaps preoccupied with their ride, and don't think to be friendly. Just keep saying hello with a smile and they will come around. The hikers seem generally friendly to me, just be polite and slow down approaching or call out "biker back" when overtaking. I've seen a fair amount of e-bikes on the trail, but they are usually in clusters. The biggest grin I ever saw on this trail was an older guy riding an Lectric XP, probably new to him. :)
 
To the OP, be sure to have a pump so that you can air down somewhat for the trail then air back up when you are on pavement. To Ned37, perhaps the other bikers were going fast enough they did not feel safe taking a hand from their grips or diverting their concentration.

Boy, the trails sure look different out there than in NC. Almost all of our riding is under the tree canopy, the trails are anywhere from 1-2 feet wide and you can't go more than ten feet without hitting a root or rock.
 

ned37

New Member
perhaps the other bikers were going fast enough they did not feel safe taking a hand from their grips or diverting their concentration
the people on bikes who didn't seem friendly didn;t even look in my direction. the one that did wave was truckin', and just lifted a couple fingers. the disappointing ones were the walkers. prob 2 out of 50 responded and one who did gave me a "slow down" motion. (i was doing 12.5 mph)
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
the people on bikes who didn't seem friendly didn;t even look in my direction. the one that did wave was truckin', and just lifted a couple fingers. the disappointing ones were the walkers. prob 2 out of 50 responded and one who did gave me a "slow down" motion. (i was doing 12.5 mph)
You have as much a right to be there as anyone else does - including walkers. Don't let them screw up your day. If they want to be nice, or just another blob on the planet, let them! You aren't doing anything wrong by being there. Enjoy yourself! You may notice, after riding that section of trail regularly, you'll start seeing familiar faces - and those faces are way more likely to give you a nod or a wave than they would a stranger.