Allant 7

damage

New Member
Region
USA
Hi All,

Just bought a new Allant 7 recently and wanted to share that so far the bike's been great except for 2 very tiny nitpicky details.

1) I noticed others have mentioned this but not sure if it's the *exact* same issue as I'm getting. When shifting up gears, there's a definite type of vibration or feeling of the gears in the motor box that lasts anywhere from 5 to maybe over 10 seconds. I can feel the sensation of 2 gears mashing and rolling against each other right after a gear change. I'm assuming that's the "vibration" others are feeling. It's definitely not coming from the chain. It's the teeth from 2 gears. I'm also assuming that as I change gears, the Bosch motor is also changing gears inside its gearbox to handle the difference in torque/speed?

2) This bike is pretty damn heavy. My wife recently bought a Specialized Turbo Como 3.0 and it's about 10lbs lighter and you can feel the difference when you lift it and move it around. I'm thinking of ways to lighten this.

I looked at removing the rear rack but saw that the light is screwed to it and also the wiring goes underneath the fender. Has anyone attempted to remove the whole rack and fender and rewire the light to mount somewhere else?

Also I think I'll swap out the front suspension forks for regular ones, maybe carbon ones to really shed significant weight. What size, spec should I look for in a replacement?

Lastly, maybe get carbon wheels with more road type of tires. I don't need nobby tires as this will be all ridden on paved roads.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
Cables stretch out on new bikes for a while and then stabilize. You probably need to turn the barrel adjuster at the shifter to tighten the cable running back to the derailleur. Check out a video on derailleur adjustment before you do anything. There are lots of good videos on youtube where you can learn to adjust the derailleur yourself or you can take the bike back to the shop to get it done.

 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Cables stretch out on new bikes for a while and then stabilize. You probably need to turn the barrel adjuster at the shifter to tighten the cable running back to the derailleur. Check out a video on derailleur adjustment before you do anything. There are lots of good videos on youtube where you can learn to adjust the derailleur yourself or you can take the bike back to the shop to get it done.

Welcome!
Bikes are always at their worst for the first three weeks as parts break in. Cable stretch is just one example. It is a big pain and part of owning a beautiful new bike. The rack is nothing on this bike, very light. Now the fork! That will be a big payoff. I rode one last week. These Allant 7's are front heavy. See if you can go with a chromoly steel bikepacking fork. These forks are light and have vibration dampening with flex. They are intended for day long rides on mountain trails with heavy bikes. It is not tire width that is the problem, it is tread design. Super Moto-X tires can come E50 rated and they fly. Aerothan tubes give weight and feel similar to tubeless yet offer added protection over regular tubes, without the catastrophic risks associated with tubeless failure.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
The +7 is a bit heavy but it’s relative. If it’s too heavy for you to ride or if thats something that will continuously bother you, I’d trade it in now. I certainly wouldn’t attempt to make it lighter by removing the rack. If it’s heavier than your wife’s bike, I’d just learn to live with that as it’s nowhere close to the heaviest bike in its class.
As for the minor vibration, I do feel it a little now and then but I’m not bothered by it.
Best of luck with your +7...I love mine with 1300 miles on it!
 

damage

New Member
Region
USA
Thanks for the tips regarding the rear derailer. I'll see if that's the cause for this pedal feedback/vibration I'm feeling. I was really thinking it's coming from the Bosch motor unit.

Regards to weight, I bought an e-bike thinking it could just really help me ride farther as I wanted to get back into shape. The weight at over 50lbs feels like I could've just bought a regular lightweight road bike for a whole lot less money and probably be able to ride just as far. Hopefully battery technology improves soon so these things don't need to carry a massive amount of cells.

Does anyone know what spec fork I need to look for if I want a non-suspension fork to replace the OEM one with?
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the tips regarding the rear derailer. I'll see if that's the cause for this pedal feedback/vibration I'm feeling. I was really thinking it's coming from the Bosch motor unit.

Regards to weight, I bought an e-bike thinking it could just really help me ride farther as I wanted to get back into shape. The weight at over 50lbs feels like I could've just bought a regular lightweight road bike for a whole lot less money and probably be able to ride just as far. Hopefully battery technology improves soon so these things don't need to carry a massive amount of cells.

Does anyone know what spec fork I need to look for if I want a non-suspension fork to replace the OEM one with?
2 very tiny nit picky details, yet you’re wanting to remove/replace the rack/rear fender and the front fork? Carbon wheels? 😂
Did you even test ride the Allant before you bought it? How many miles have you put on it? I really think you need to trade it in on your wife’s bike.
 

damage

New Member
Region
USA
2 very tiny nit picky details, yet you’re wanting to remove/replace the rack/rear fender and the front fork? Carbon wheels? 😂
Did you even test ride the Allant before you bought it? How many miles have you put on it? I really think you need to trade it in on your wife’s bike.

Yes I did a test ride. Has no one ever formed more opinions after a short test ride?

So getting this thread back to being useful, what non suspension fork options do I have? I guess I need to look for same length, support disc brake mounting, and head tube type/size?
 

jpa2825

Member
If you're discussing weight for riding, that's one thing. If you're discussing weight for putting in / out of car or on a hook or something, I always advise to take the battery out before such moves. Keeps it in a safe place and makes both of my e-bikes easier to get in and out of the car.
 

MartsEbike

Active Member
Region
United Kingdom
I'm also assuming that as I change gears, the Bosch motor is also changing gears inside its gearbox to handle the difference in torque/speed?
There is no extra gearbox in the motor.
 
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damage

New Member
Region
USA
The fork on this bike according to the Suntour website is at least 2000g (or 4 lb). I'm looking at random carbon forks and they're around 500g (or ~1lb).

What's wrong with someone trying to lighten their bike?
 
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damage

New Member
Region
USA
Welcome!
Bikes are always at their worst for the first three weeks as parts break in. Cable stretch is just one example. It is a big pain and part of owning a beautiful new bike. The rack is nothing on this bike, very light. Now the fork! That will be a big payoff. I rode one last week. These Allant 7's are front heavy. See if you can go with a chromoly steel bikepacking fork. These forks are light and have vibration dampening with flex. They are intended for day long rides on mountain trails with heavy bikes. It is not tire width that is the problem, it is tread design. Super Moto-X tires can come E50 rated and they fly. Aerothan tubes give weight and feel similar to tubeless yet offer added protection over regular tubes, without the catastrophic risks associated with tubeless failure.

Thanks for the tips. I found this page that highlights a few bikepacking forks
 
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PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
I never go for stock with my bikes. That is how I act like a dick, screw up and learn new things.
I think your existing fork is the heavy spring loaded one. If it is the air fork, don't bother.
For the dimensions of the fork go here: https://www.srsuntour.com/no/products/fork/MOBIE25-5905.html
But before ordering a new one remove the stem and pull the fork to check the measurements your existing one's neck with digital calipers. The size of the bearings is what you are going for. Also note the type of axle and its dimensions. I think it is the 15mm thru axle.
Those Surly forks are nice. So are SOMA.
 
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Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Hi All,

Just bought a new Allant 7 recently and wanted to share that so far the bike's been great except for 2 very tiny nitpicky details.

1) I noticed others have mentioned this but not sure if it's the *exact* same issue as I'm getting. When shifting up gears, there's a definite type of vibration or feeling of the gears in the motor box that lasts anywhere from 5 to maybe over 10 seconds. I can feel the sensation of 2 gears mashing and rolling against each other right after a gear change. I'm assuming that's the "vibration" others are feeling. It's definitely not coming from the chain. It's the teeth from 2 gears. I'm also assuming that as I change gears, the Bosch motor is also changing gears inside its gearbox to handle the difference in torque/speed?

2) This bike is pretty damn heavy. My wife recently bought a Specialized Turbo Como 3.0 and it's about 10lbs lighter and you can feel the difference when you lift it and move it around. I'm thinking of ways to lighten this.

I looked at removing the rear rack but saw that the light is screwed to it and also the wiring goes underneath the fender. Has anyone attempted to remove the whole rack and fender and rewire the light to mount somewhere else?

Also I think I'll swap out the front suspension forks for regular ones, maybe carbon ones to really shed significant weight. What size, spec should I look for in a replacement?

Lastly, maybe get carbon wheels with more road type of tires. I don't need nobby tires as this will be all ridden on paved roads.
The vibration you’re feeling is normal and is present periodically on my trek allant 8s too. I have no motor problems to report. If your motor was failing you would know it because it would have a soul crushing ride ending sound that is unmistakable.

Most e-bikes are heavy except for a few new emtb models. The allant line is actually lighter than most e-bikes in its class. As for weight savings you would save the most weight switching to a solid carbon fork but I don’t think it’s worth it since the allant is only about 55lbs with the battery.

When carrying/lifting your allant do you remove the battery? The battery is about 8-9 lbs and removing it before carrying it makes all the difference.
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
Most e-bikes are heavy except for a few new emtb models. The allant line is actually lighter than most e-bikes in its class. As for weight savings you would save the most weight switching to a solid carbon fork but I don’t think it’s worth it since the allant is only about 55lbs with the battery.
Is the Allant 8s a little lighter than the Allant 7s? Or with the larger battery and wider tires make up the difference in not having a suspension? Not that it's significant. I already bought a cadence sensor based hub drive bike this year, but I'm just looking ahead a year or so to adding a mid-drive torque sensor bike to my stable. I prefer the longer range battery since I sometimes take long rides over 60 miles, but I'm used to having suspensions. I suppose I should just lock it out and see how much different it rides over some of my bumpy rural roads. I already use a Suntour suspension seat post with a shim that I could move to other bikes.
 
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Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Is the Allant 8s a little lighter than the Allant 7s? Or with the larger battery and wider tires make up the difference in not having a suspension? Not that it's significant. I already bought a cadence sensor based hub drive bike this year, but I'm just looking ahead a year or so to adding a mid-drive torque sensor bike to my stable. I prefer the longer range battery since I sometimes take long rides over 60 miles, but I'm used to having suspensions. I suppose I should just lock it out and see how much different it rides over some of my bumpy rural roads. I already use a Suntour suspension seat post with a shim that I could move to other bikes.
The 8s might be a little lighter due to the solid fork but as you pointed out the battery is bigger and weighs more so it cancels out.

Larger battery is better for longer tours ofcourse but both the allant 8s and 7 are compatible with the dual battery set up. So if you want the suspension fork and extended range the allant 7 would make more sense for you since it can be optioned with the dual battery 2x500wh.
 

GenXrider

Well-Known Member
As for the minor vibration, I do feel it a little now and then but I’m not bothered by it.
Best of luck with your +7...I love mine with 1300 miles on it!
I recall you ordered a spare battery last year, IIRC, that was taking forever to get shipped. Did you ever receive it, yet?