Allant 8s Test Ride

rochrunner

Member
I dropped by a local Trek store just wanting to look at an Allant and found that they had just received their first shipment and put together the first 8s. I hadn't been planning on a test ride, but it was an unseasonably warm day for late November and they made the offer, so I took it. Before riding it, I confirmed that the bike I might have been more interested in -- the DualSport+ -- is not being offered for 2020, but maybe an Allant 7s with the suspension fork might be an alternative. The 8s of course has a solid fork, but I could at least get a feel for it.

The ride itself was OK and as a Class 3 bike it certainly has the power to scoot right along, but overall I felt the riding position to be more upright than I'm used to and still felt like I was too close over the front wheel (short wheelbase, maybe?). To be fair, the bike they had was a size Medium where I would normally ride a Large, so the seatpost was pretty much maxed out for my riding position. Even with the solid fork, riding on the bumpy side streets with those big street tires at 40psi it was smooth, but would not do on some of the rough dirt roads that I sometimes like to use out where I live.

Other than just being too much of a "commuter bike" in the way it's equipped, I saw two showstoppers that would be hard to fix. One is the rack, which is designed strictly for panniers instead of the rack bags that I'd rather use, and there are no front rack mount points to make replacing it easy (I don't like seatpost-mounted racks). The other issue is that the standard display is rather small and minimal in functionality and you pretty much have to mount your smartphone on the bars to get much functionality. Sorry, I just don't want to do this for several reasons (and I hope there's a way to plug the phone in to charge it while riding).

So in summary, while it's a great-looking bike and would be quite suitable if I were to use it mainly around town for running errands and sticking to bike lanes and multi-use paths, I want something that is better suited for multi-surface riding and rougher terrain.
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
I dropped by a local Trek store just wanting to look at an Allant and found that they had just received their first shipment and put together the first 8s... The ride itself was OK and as a Class 3 bike it certainly has the power to scoot right along, but overall I felt the riding position to be more upright than I'm used to and still felt like I was too close over the front wheel (short wheelbase, maybe?). To be fair, the bike they had was a size Medium where I would normally ride a Large, so the seatpost was pretty much maxed out for my riding position. Even with the solid fork, riding on the bumpy side streets with those big street tires at 40psi it was smooth, but would not do on some of the rough dirt roads that I sometimes like to use out where I live...Other than just being too much of a "commuter bike" in the way it's equipped, I saw two showstoppers that would be hard to fix. One is the rack, which is designed strictly for panniers instead of the rack bags that I'd rather use, and there are no front rack mount points to make replacing it easy (I don't like seatpost-mounted racks). The other issue is that the standard display is rather small and minimal in functionality and you pretty much have to mount your smartphone on the bars to get much functionality. Sorry, I just don't want to do this for several reasons (and I hope there's a way to plug the phone in to charge it while riding).

So in summary, while it's a great-looking bike and would be quite suitable if I were to use it mainly around town for running errands and sticking to bike lanes and multi-use paths, I want something that is better suited for multi-surface riding and rougher terrain.
I agree with most of this. If the 8s geometry is the same as the 9s it is a shorter wheelbase and the rider is over the front wheel. For me, it is a bit more aero than my other bikes but I am on the medium (correct size for me). It is definitely designed and marketed as being in the 'city', 'urban' and 'commuter' categories therefore having a lighter, minimalist pannier rack and rigid fork options is consistent with that. The primary display is intended to be the rider's smartphone.
 

Rick53

Active Member
I dropped by a local Trek store just wanting to look at an Allant and found that they had just received their first shipment and put together the first 8s. I hadn't been planning on a test ride, but it was an unseasonably warm day for late November and they made the offer, so I took it. Before riding it, I confirmed that the bike I might have been more interested in -- the DualSport+ -- is not being offered for 2020, but maybe an Allant 7s with the suspension fork might be an alternative. The 8s of course has a solid fork, but I could at least get a feel for it.

The ride itself was OK and as a Class 3 bike it certainly has the power to scoot right along, but overall I felt the riding position to be more upright than I'm used to and still felt like I was too close over the front wheel (short wheelbase, maybe?). To be fair, the bike they had was a size Medium where I would normally ride a Large, so the seatpost was pretty much maxed out for my riding position. Even with the solid fork, riding on the bumpy side streets with those big street tires at 40psi it was smooth, but would not do on some of the rough dirt roads that I sometimes like to use out where I live.

Other than just being too much of a "commuter bike" in the way it's equipped, I saw two showstoppers that would be hard to fix. One is the rack, which is designed strictly for panniers instead of the rack bags that I'd rather use, and there are no front rack mount points to make replacing it easy (I don't like seatpost-mounted racks). The other issue is that the standard display is rather small and minimal in functionality and you pretty much have to mount your smartphone on the bars to get much functionality. Sorry, I just don't want to do this for several reasons (and I hope there's a way to plug the phone in to charge it while riding).

So in summary, while it's a great-looking bike and would be quite suitable if I were to use it mainly around town for running errands and sticking to bike lanes and multi-use paths, I want something that is better suited for multi-surface riding and rougher terrain.
The Alliants are built like the Trek FX . Your experience sounds like mine. IMO the Trek Alliants are built for someone Smaller . With Shorter arms and Legs : It's not a Tall or Big man's Bike. My Dealer Sells both Trek and Specialized : I am a Trek Fan > Butttt I have to admit The VADO or even teh Como are My geometry preference : The Vado I test Rode was a Woman's Small . But it felt roomier the an Allaint Large
 

rochrunner

Member
The Alliants are built like the Trek FX . Your experience sounds like mine. IMO the Trek Alliants are built for someone Smaller . With Shorter arms and Legs : It's not a Tall or Big man's Bike. My Dealer Sells both Trek and Specialized : I am a Trek Fan > Butttt I have to admit The VADO or even teh Como are My geometry preference : The Vado I test Rode was a Woman's Small . But it felt roomier the an Allaint Large
Interestingly, the Vado is what I had already selected unless something really new pops up in the next few months. My current hybrid-type bike is a Specialized Crosstrail (similar to Trek DualSport) and the Vado is based on the Crosstrail's geometry. I had a Vado on loan for a couple days and felt right at home on it as soon as I got on. The Allant ride was just a lark as I'd already pretty much ruled it out.
 

Rick53

Active Member
Interestingly, the Vado is what I had already selected unless something really new pops up in the next few months. My current hybrid-type bike is a Specialized Crosstrail (similar to Trek DualSport) and the Vado is based on the Crosstrail's geometry. I had a Vado on loan for a couple days and felt right at home on it as soon as I got on. The Allant ride was just a lark as I'd already pretty much ruled it out.
Yeah I've done enough research that will likely go with a Vado 4 or 5 : Waiting until Spring : I live along the shores of Lake Michigan North of Muskegon : It hasn't been warm enough here to do any rides : Plus My LBS only has the Como 2 and a Vado 3 in Stock : Even the rear Rack appears more useful then the Alliants do. If Trek was making a Class 3 Dual Sport but they aren't. Waiting to see this :
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
The Alliants are built like the Trek FX ...
Yes, this nails it. the Allant 9.9s bears a striking resemblance to the FX6. A while back I had the FX6 on my short list of non-electrics I would buy if I were to buy another non-electric.