Allant Battery Issue

GuruUno

Active Member
For the love of God! Just wait until there is a full moon, low tide, and a small tremor in the earths crust. THEN try to do what the F!$%%^you are supposed to do!
The freaking point is it sSHOULD BE a no brainer.
HELLLLLLLOOOOOOOOOOOO TREK!
 

Over50

Well-Known Member
This response from the fellas' dealer is what I would have expected to do. IME latching mechanisms and their associated parts are often unobtanium for many battery packs. I would have always unlocked and inserted and tested the firmness.
But, again, only because any failures on my bikes are my fault.

Is there a technique that solves the problem?
Sorry but was this a question for me? I don't know if it is a technique that solves the problem but the only technique that works on my Allant is to open the lock with the key, seat the battery with the key inserted/while holding the mechanism open, and then turn the key to re-lock. And this was per my LBS instructions when they did the initial walk-through with me. That is in contrast to my other Bosch bikes with the older Powerpack design wherein I can pop the battery into place without using the key. And I've been meaning to re-watch some of Court's reviews on Bosch Powertube bikes to see if he mentions this - just haven't had time. I've only ridden 120 miles some of which were on the crappiest roads in my area. My battery hasn't gone flying yet - but given the reported incidents, I'm adding the velcro zip-tie/strap going forward.
 

Alaskan

Well-Known Member
The Bosch power tube mechanism on my Homage requires me to use the key to open the lock when I insert the battery and then push it in until it snaps into place. Good thing I read the manual first, as my older bike with a power pack just needed a firm push till it clicked, no key needed. Puzzling to me how people fail to read the manual on new equipment and then blame manufacturers for faulty design.
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Puzzling to me how people fail to read the manual on new equipment and then blame manufacturers for faulty design.
Spot on! This is so common! The most brilliant of customers can be befuddled by an issue addressed in the manual.

What does the manual say in this case?
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
So, reading the manual indicates there is a "prefright" battery check. And it takes paying attention to the process or the battery can fall out. I called my Trek dealer buddy, he thinks his customers with an issue didn't pay attention to the instructions and confirm the battery was fully seated or locked. Now before anyone goes off. I'm looking at a demo so my interest is peaked. My experience with Trek goes all the way back to the first store. While the new corporate monster is more difficult to penetrate I've managed to get them to step up and make good on any issue. Although they dumbed down the flat foot frames by giving up the Pure and it's predecessors and buying Electra. One way to settle a patent infringement...


I'M NOT SUGGESTING IS IT THE CASE HERE but it's clear there is room for operator error

But the manual does say,

 Always check that the battery pack is locked in
place. To do this, pull on the battery pack (after the key has been removed).


Are posters saying this a design error?


In order for the battery pack to be inserted, the key 5 must be inserted into the lock 6 and the lock must be unlocked.

 To insert the PowerTube battery, 15 place it so that its
contacts are in the lower bracket of the frame.

 Push the battery upwards until it is held by the safety
restraint 14.

 Press the battery upwards until you hear it engage.
Check that the battery is secure.

 Always secure the battery by closing the lock 6 – other-
wise, the lock may open and the battery may fall out of the bracket.

 Always check that the battery pack is locked in place. To do this, pull on the battery pack (after the key has been removed).
After locking, always remove the key 5 from the lock 6. This prevents the key from falling out and the battery pack from being removed by unauthorized persons when the eBike is parked.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
The Bosch power tube mechanism on my Homage requires me to use the key to open the lock when I insert the battery and then push it in until it snaps into place. Good thing I read the manual first, as my older bike with a power pack just needed a firm push till it clicked, no key needed. Puzzling to me how people fail to read the manual on new equipment and then blame manufacturers for faulty design.
WELL, MAYBE the LBS did not clearly identify it for those of us who had/have the problem, ya think?
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
Robnj...a country with shoddy workmanship? You mean the country that lied about their diesel emissions thus hurting everyone? Or check out the fine German reliability of VW, Mercedes, Audi or BMW compared to much less expensive Japanese or Korean cars in consumer's report. Fine German engineering is basically Kool Aid when you start comparing their products to the better made Asian units.
I suggest you Google Cummins Diesel in Bloomington, Indiana to see that Diesel engine manufacturers all over the world did the same thing. Cummins was fined and had a major recall. Volkswagen just had the deep pockets and were an easy target. Here’s a list of manufacturers besides Cummins. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_emissions_scandal
 
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steve mercier

Well-Known Member
New models come with glitches. It is incumbent upon Trek to make it right and I am sure they will. Nevertheless your patience will be tested. That is why I am waiting for more feedback on the new Bosch engines to make sure they get all the gremlins out before I will leap to buy one.
 
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Alaskan

Well-Known Member
WELL, MAYBE the LBS did not clearly identify it for those of us who had/have the problem, ya think?
You asked what I think so here is just what I think based on what I have read thus far.

It is still unclear whether this is an issue of poor design, poor communication, operator error or some combination of the three.

Key questions remain unanswered.

Is it reasonable to expect a young retail floor, LBS employee to provide a new owner with all the information he or she will need to operate a fresh on the market, high tech bike properly, without having to read the manual?

Did you even bother to read the manual and go through the recommended check list before jumping on?

It seems like you are intent on pinning all the blame elsewhere. Expecting a "no brainer" instead of using your brain will almost always lead to trouble. It sounds to me like there is more than enough blame to go around here.

Paying out gobs of money so that you don't have to think or accept any responsibility for failing to do, just cannot be done. It's your ass on the line when you ride a bike.

Take reasonable precautions...like reading the manual, even if you think you know everything there is to know. You just might learn something important that the kid in the shop omitted.

I do not own any Trek bikes so I really have no dog in this fight.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
eh, analogy here, regardless of product, device, anything.
"Hi, welcome to Tesla" (or BMW, or Chevy, or anyone/anything).
"Thanks for purchasing our product, here are your keys, bye"!
eh, more coaching, more training, more education on the part of the representative of the company selling the product, whatever it is.
Sure, RTFM is in order, BUT if there is a CRITICAL, DIFFERENT, PROBLEMATIC, deficiency that is a potential problem, eh, me thinks it needs to be made aware to those who make the buy.
I, as a support engineer for 30+ years can tell you war stories that will make your head spin.
 

barrybenisch

New Member
LBS extremely responsive
Their diagnosis is a loose locking mechanism that has been remedied!
Does the manual address loose locking mechanisms?
Bike pro’s, like those who post here, are quick to blame the simple uneducated consumers who purchase their products like me and not themselves!
Incidentally, I can’t adjust the clutch on my BMW 340 either.....but I’m pretty good at my job!
 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
Bike pro’s, like those who post here, are quick to blame the simple uneducated consumers who purchase their products like me and not themselves!
I think you're misconstruing the reactions. Anyone that spends time here helping other riders has seen hundreds of posts where riders blame the maker for all sorts of issues. After 5 years of customer support, I have some pretty crazy stories. We're ALL glad you resolved the issue. It, however, does remain clear that some riders just never take the time to absorb a manual and blame some young LBS sales guy for not covering every potential issue.

Enjoy the ride, you have a great bike!
 

GuruUno

Active Member
My dealer fixed the flaw too as initially described. Point is R&D should have NEVER let it out the door. Period. Poor design. Much like a recall. Hence class action lawsuits.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
Before or after a serious incident? All is quiet until a catastrophe. Enough complaints then it gets acknowledged.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
The Bosch power tube mechanism on my Homage requires me to use the key to open the lock when I insert the battery and then push it in until it snaps into place. Good thing I read the manual first, as my older bike with a power pack just needed a firm push till it clicked, no key needed. Puzzling to me how people fail to read the manual on new equipment and then blame manufacturers for faulty design.
I plead guilty your honors
 

Oberst

Member
To install the battery on my wifes Powerfly 5 the key must be turned to unlock then locked to remove the key for what its worth
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
To install the battery on my wifes Powerfly 5 the key must be turned to unlock then locked to remove the key for what its worth
This is somewhat off topic ... call me a Ludite but I prefer the powerpacks. I would have to figure out a new way to carry extra powertubes ,which I suppose would not be that difficult but I like the handle on the powerpack. I know they will be phased out since the powertubes can already hold 625 but if I have to switch batteries anyways I might switch over to a Shimano powered bike when the time comes.
 
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