Allant Battery Issue

GuruUno

Active Member
Let's revisit this for a moment.
I did not purchase a $600 bike, I purchased a $6,000 bike.
I should not have to have concerns of a design deficiency that needs to be taught to me, the consumer/purchaser of my "luxury" item, because it was discovered that there are multiple incidents resulting from the original product design.
If remembered, prior to this post, there were a few others, and one of them was mine that I had shared that LBS employees were "concerned" and delaying the Allant because of "L" bracket problems for the battery.
So, we can beat this back and forth like a dead hors.
This bike, although very nice, was a failure on the part of the Research and Development department of Trek.
How long did they "beta test" or how many bikes were part of that test?
Only after initial shipping and delivery these deficiencies came to light?
The BEST part of dealing with a company like Trek is that they take care of their customers and solve their problems.
I'd not consider any other.
But that does not excuse them from the poor judgements and decisions that are shown by this problem.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
A young friend ( who is a mechanical engineer) bought a BMW Z4. It kept letting him down so he sold it and bought a Mazda MX5. The Z4 cost much more than the Miata. High sticker price does not always guarantee perfection.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
I too have had similar experiences, owning over 80 cars, trucks, motorcycles, e-bikes.
I've had good and bad experiences.
However, let's not deviate from the point here: Who was asleep at the wheel? How could THIS defect be allowed into production? What does that say for the long term trust that Trek is working hard to build?
Everyone is entitled to make a mistake. But if I was the design engineer who created this battery lock mechanism, and it was allowed to propagate into the real world, I'd have been fired.
This is the point.
Who is minding the ship?
Todays economy has lots and lots of marketing and sales, support is considered secondary, and it is realized very simply by daily experiences with almost any product or vendor.
Being Trek is stepping things up with a nationwide dealer network and highly competitive products, one has to wonder how this was overlooked, that is the only point I wish to emphasize here.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I too have had similar experiences, owning over 80 cars, trucks, motorcycles, e-bikes.
I've had good and bad experiences.
However, let's not deviate from the point here: Who was asleep at the wheel? How could THIS defect be allowed into production? What does that say for the long term trust that Trek is working hard to build?
Everyone is entitled to make a mistake. But if I was the design engineer who created this battery lock mechanism, and it was allowed to propagate into the real world, I'd have been fired.
This is the point.
Who is minding the ship?
Todays economy has lots and lots of marketing and sales, support is considered secondary, and it is realized very simply by daily experiences with almost any product or vendor.
Being Trek is stepping things up with a nationwide dealer network and highly competitive products, one has to wonder how this was overlooked, that is the only point I wish to emphasize here.
You have a valid point of view for sure. I just cannot help thinking of common examples of this corporate behaviour. Microsoft Windows comes foremost to mind. They sell it first and patch it later. Does anybody get fired ? That is why I will not buy a Bosch Gen 4 motor until I am sure it has no big issues.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I learned decades ago to not buy first year major design model changes. I think the last straw for me was a turbocharged 1979 Ford Mustang. Miserable damned car! I carry that knowledge today. You’re living in a fantasy world if you think major companies should have extensive long term testing of product lines. They use finite element analysis and other computer simulations to predict failures. They aren’t going to put riders on saddles for 6 months of testing before releasing. Technology moves too quickly to allow Beta testing.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
I too have had similar experiences, owning over 80 cars, trucks, motorcycles, e-bikes.
I've had good and bad experiences.
However, let's not deviate from the point here: Who was asleep at the wheel? How could THIS defect be allowed into production? What does that say for the long term trust that Trek is working hard to build?
Everyone is entitled to make a mistake. But if I was the design engineer who created this battery lock mechanism, and it was allowed to propagate into the real world, I'd have been fired.
This is the point.
Who is minding the ship?
Todays economy has lots and lots of marketing and sales, support is considered secondary, and it is realized very simply by daily experiences with almost any product or vendor.
Being Trek is stepping things up with a nationwide dealer network and highly competitive products, one has to wonder how this was overlooked, that is the only point I wish to emphasize here.
Wow so many cars? Are you Jay Leno ? How come so many?
 

GuruUno

Active Member
Wheels, Work, Wine, WWW, in that order. When the new car smell starts to fade, time for a renewed odor.
 
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Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
one has to wonder how this was overlooked, that is the only point I wish to emphasize here.
It looks like they kind of rushed to bring this ebike to the market. Most companies are bringing the new ones in February/March.

It was the same with the EV cars- The Tesla model 3 had many issues in the beginning , actually most of the 1st year.

Just put it togheter, ship it and make the sale !! We worry about problems later...

Haibike- The Flyon models are not available yet for 2020.
Stromer - no new 2020 yet
BH- March/April for tHE US models.
 

GuruUno

Active Member
RE: "It was the same with the EV cars"
I had a 2013 Ford Focus Electric, I was an "early adopter"
However, I'm under an NDA, I cannot discuss.
So yes, just like Microsoft introducing Windows 98 at the Las Vegas Comdex in 1998 ( https://www.itprotoday.com/windows-8/windows-98-crashes-during-gates-demo ), the world has learned; Introduce the product, flaws, bugs, problems, generate enough revenue, fix the problems as we make more money. This is the business model that the would has adopted and yearned to follow, and why the 'Streets Are Paved With Gold'.
I sometimes wish I could get away with what things others do and retire a billionaire. But that is not in my DNA.
Seems to be the way it is.
 

Oberst

Member
This is somewhat off topic ... call me a Ludite but I prefer the powerpacks. I would have to figure out a new way to carry extra powertubes ,which I suppose would not be that difficult but I like the handle on the powerpack. I know they will be phased out since the powertubes can already hold 625 but if I have to switch batteries anyways I might switch over to a Shimano powered bike when the time comes.
Well, my Trek bike is the Cross-Rip E with 2 powerpacks. Right now it is set up without fenders or rack and 700 x 40 gravel tires. Come spring, the road tires will go back on and the rack for long trips and need for a spare battery so I prefer the powerpack as well. I think it adds more versatility to the bike.
 

Solom01

Active Member
I suggest you Google Cummins Diesel in Bloomington, Indiana to see that Diesel engine manufacturers all over the world did the same thing. Cummins was fined and had a major recall. Volkswagen just had the deep pockets and were an easy target. Here’s a list of manufacturers besides Cummins. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_emissions_scandal
Thus reinforcing what I said - there is no good or bad product based on country of origin. By the way, a lot of the Germans are in jail for these violations, I don't recall anyone else doing jail time. Every other car - not truck - manufacturer had to use bluetech additive to achieve emissions goals, only the Germans sold cars in the US without it which they claimed was due to their advanced technical prowess - which I guess is true, no other manufacturer was as good at cheating.