Aloha from Minnesota

007vsMagua

New Member
I just turned 65 and live in Southern Minnesota. I've owned many bikes over the years, but over the last ten years I've gotten away from bike riding. Over a month ago I caught a video at YouTube reviewing the RadWagon and I thought it was the cats meow because it was the first introduction I had to commercial electric bikes. My knees are not what they used to be and the idea of an electric bike could be a reasonable way for me to get some moderate exercise. My future will include solar panels and the idea of being able to have a form of transport that should be more earth friendly seems doable.

Actually, about two years ago I was downtown and talked to a rider who was riding a homemade electric bike and he was very happy to talk to me. He mentioned he had to be careful around the police when it came to his speed. I really liked what he did and the concept made a lot of sense to me.

Since my first video introduction to the commercial (cottage?) industry, I've been doing a lot more digging and research about eBikes. I joined this forum to be able to learn more and will soon be asking questions. It seems the industry is still in the beginning stage of development with the wheat being separated from the chaff.

It will probably be a year before I will be able to afford the eBike type that I like...hint ST1.

Will be hearing from me soon enough.

Dennis
 

James Kohls

Active Member
Hello, fellow Minnesotan! The RadWagon is pretty great looking. If I could afford to have multiple e-bikes, I would love to have one of those for shopping. Regarding the police, in Minnesota laws are 20MPH max assistance and brakes with motor cutoffs. My bike doesn't meet either of those requirements, but I haven't had any run-ins with the police yet. I'm guessing the homemade e-bike you saw wasn't speed limited like a commercial model would be.

It is never too early to start researching. Bike prices keep falling as the market gets more and more saturated. That being said, my Specialized Turbo X was $1400 lower being a previous model year bike. So looking at last years models where available is a good way to save some money!
 

007vsMagua

New Member
Hello, fellow Minnesotan! The RadWagon is pretty great looking. If I could afford to have multiple e-bikes, I would love to have one of those for shopping. Regarding the police, in Minnesota laws are 20MPH max assistance and brakes with motor cutoffs. My bike doesn't meet either of those requirements, but I haven't had any run-ins with the police yet. I'm guessing the homemade e-bike you saw wasn't speed limited like a commercial model would be.

It is never too early to start researching. Bike prices keep falling as the market gets more and more saturated. That being said, my Specialized Turbo X was $1400 lower being a previous model year bike. So looking at last years models where available is a good way to save some money!

Yeah, the RadWagon is a great concept, but I'd like a bike that is more fun, faster, lighter, handles different road and trail types with a good sized tire, and has a well designed rear rack that is attached to the frame beneath the seat using a floating attachment with two strong supports going to the rear axle that have built-in shock absorbers, and of course a nice rear light. I have no idea why rear racks are being attached to the fenders? ...bad idea. (The concept of that rear bike rake just came to me as I was writing this reply)

I'll be going down the road at 20 mph in traffic and be passed by all kinds of bikes going faster. I have no idea why they picked 20mph as the limit. I kind of like the idea of having both brakes with motor cutoffs.

I went to YouTube and watched Court's year old review of the Specialized Turbo X and the Turbo X comes very close to the ST1. The down tube battery placement is perfect. I just went to the Specialized web site to look at their latest Turbo X but was somewhat disappointed that more specific information on the motor type and battery specifications were lacking. I'm assuming that the motor is brushless and gearless. I also noticed at their website they had no direct link to Support for downloading information. I really like the front fork and the newer design has suspension under the seat. I also really like their kickstand.

So, how long James have you owned your Turbo X? Do you use it for commuting, recreation, or both? Is it pretty easy to maintain? Has it been reliable?

It was chilly last night and the furnace kicked in for the first time this year.
 

James Kohls

Active Member
The Turbo X is very similar. In fact for the few months I spent researching bikes I went back and fourth between the Turbo line and Stromer line. I finally settled on the 2015 Turbo X because it had reduced in price from $4,000 to $2600. I think the Stromers are very nice too. There are lots of people here to love them.

The kickstand is a mixed blessing. It looks more stable than it really it and I've actually knocked by bike on the ground twice—damaging it both times. A 50 pound bike falls really really fast. It is really nice for changing a tire tho. Having suspension is very nice. Really helps with man hole covers and smoothing out bumps. The seatpost suspension on the 2016 Turbo X is a nice addition. I may add one aftermarket to mine. The motors on most bikes, including the Turbos are brushless. The Turbos are all gearless and silent, which I love. The only noise you hear is the wind and the tires, depending on pavement type.

I've owned my turbo for going on 4 months now, if memory serves correct. It has been very reliable and I'm fairly experienced with bike maintenance, so I've taken care of all my own maintenance. I post most of my experience to my review thread in the Specialized forum. LINK!

My furnace should kick in tonight, going to be down in the 40's! Eek. Still riding my bike tho.
 

007vsMagua

New Member
Hey Jim, still online?

It's been over a year since I started thinking about e-bikes. My finances have improved so I'm almost ready to climb onboard. I have a new favorite bike: the RadCity. With Winter coming, I'm tempted to order one now and just have it in my living room with flashing Christmas lights hanging on it until Spring. But then again, the current RadCity is well over a year old and considering Rad Power Bikes advancement I suspect a new model should be on the horizon. My gut tells me to wait. (See: RadRhino-Europe _ YouTube)

There are other considerations like: Helmet; Tool Kit; Bags; Spare Inner Tube; Water Bottle; Cell Phone; Better Lighting?

I could think of all those other items as stocking stuffers:)

PS_ Cort, Maybe you could head back to Seattle and take a RadCity on a 20 mile off-road minor mountain bike trail and share your thoughts.
 

rich c

Well-Known Member
I wouldn't suggest a RadCity for mountain bike trails that have much for roots, rocks, steep descents, and jumps. That upright riding position, rear hub motor, and fenders are features that could cause issues. I ride two styles of Haibikes for different styles of riding. A trekking for pavement and a full suspension bike for mountain biking. I'm also 65 and love the full suspension when going off road. I need the lower handle bar for keeping balanced and making controlled descents. The mid drive also balances the bike and also really helps for tight switchbacks during descent.