An Electric Bike buying tip that might help...

Hey guys,

Hope my personal experience might help a few people...
When I bought my first electric bike, I was lucky, because I had so many different experiences on rental e bikes. I was so often told that I’d enjoy a 40km or 70km range, and in truth that must have related to a very downhill journey, because not one’ lived up to the stores’ claims…

There is a very simple, yet little known formula, which helped me, and might help you, to figure out a bit more about the potential of an e bike (or e-scooter) before buying it.

Average e-bikes with 400-500W batteries may well travel up to 100-120 km on one charge, but the reality is ‘ta lot don’t,,, and on such an unlikely occasion, you certainly might not be calling for much battery assistance.

The current longest range of the most powerful electric bicycles can be 350-400 km on one charge. The reality of this is, that most such e-bikes could be powered by 3000 watts…. 3 kilo watt batteries.

So here we go...

The highest number on the battery does NOT mean that it lasts longer, goes faster, or goes further.

Volts (V) describe how quickly electrons can jump around inside your battery.

The higher the (V) the faster your eBike can go. A 48v eBike should go faster than 36v eBike etc.

But just because your battery can sprint, does not, unfortunately, mean it can last for a marathon or even get you up a hill.

Therefore, you should NOT make a buying decision based ONLY on Volts.

Amps are a measure of Force.

Amp Hours (Ah) tells you how many Amps a battery can maintain the force of, For One Hour. This is a super important feature that you need to note when considering your purchase. Most e-Bike batteries are either remarked as 10 Amp hours or 20 Amp hours (Ah).

Amp Hours (Ah) needs to be multiplied by one other battery measure, and THAT sum will enable you to figure out whether it will be a great or an average battery.

Please read the examples after you’ve read the formula, so you absolutely understand why the formula is so critically important to your buying decision, and the advertising might never trick you again.

The multiplication of Volts by Amp Hours gives you Watt Hours (Wh) and this is the number to look out for, in e-Bike descriptions. The formula is (v X ah = wh)

If Watt Hours (Wh) are not shown in battery spec, it could be because the battery is Not great, but knowing this formula, you can now very quickly discover it for any battery.

A practical real-life example….

Let’s say a battery is advertised as having 36 Volts (36v) and with 10 Amp Hours (10 Ah)

The simple formula of multiplying Volts by Amp Hours will give you 10 X 36 = 360-watt hours.

That will give you 360 watts of energy for one full hour…. (Batteries are generally rounded to numbers like ; 250w, 350w, 500w, 1000w etc.. so this one would be a 350w).

But what the hell, or where the hell, does 350w get me, I hear you ask ?

So, the battery can deliver 350 watts for 1 hour. That means you could be nicely cruising on your e bike, and probably calling constantly for a mid-level of assistance from your battery for one hour, before it starts to weaken.

Now let’s say you want to give it a lash, with you barely turning the pedals yourself. The battery could deliver you its highest level of assistance with a burst of twice the wattage but for half the time…. So you might enjoy the quick hit of super powers of 700 watts, but only for 30 mins, before it starts to weaken.

And finally if you’re out for a spin, pedaling a little bit harder, and calling for a very low level of assistance from that battery, it could be giving you love in the form of only 175w of assistance, but that love could give you a comfy feeling for 2 hours.

This is the reality of e bike and e scooter batteries today. On a personal note, you may be surprised or relieved, to learn that I actually have an e Bike, and I absolutely love it.

Please feel free to send / share this with your friends, and with my compliments.

Best regards,
Eddie.
Gifts4cyclists.com
 

Ebiker01

Well-Known Member
he battery can deliver 350 watts for 1 hour.

Wrong. You're assuming all riders have the same weight , same wind , same terrain.

Keep in mind the US almost 60% of adults are obese !

Real test: Try to put a 350 pound rider on a inclined road with 20mph wind ,30mph wind gusts and she or he will get 10-12minutes of riding before all of those 10amps are gone... and also it depends on the Pas level. But anywhere from 8min to 12min. for those variables.
 

Comfortably Numb

Active Member
Real test: Try to put a 350 pound rider on a inclined road with 20mph wind ,30mph wind gusts and she or he will get 10-12minutes of riding before all of those 10amps are gone... and also it depends on the Pas level. But anywhere from 8min to 12min. for those variables.
Think of the Wh as battery capacity. It has nothing to do with the person riding the bike. If your riding happens to use the volume up quicker, like in the example you give above, of course it won't last long, but that has no bearing on the 'volume' or capacity of the battery.
 

Comfortably Numb

Active Member
Hey guys,

Hope my personal experience might help a few people...
When I bought my first electric bike, I was lucky, because I had so many different experiences on rental e bikes. I was so often told that I’d enjoy a 40km or 70km range, and in truth that must have related to a very downhill journey, because not one’ lived up to the stores’ claims…

There is a very simple, yet little known formula, which helped me, and might help you, to figure out a bit more about the potential of an e bike (or e-scooter) before buying it.

Average e-bikes with 400-500W batteries may well travel up to 100-120 km on one charge, but the reality is ‘ta lot don’t,,, and on such an unlikely occasion, you certainly might not be calling for much battery assistance.

The current longest range of the most powerful electric bicycles can be 350-400 km on one charge. The reality of this is, that most such e-bikes could be powered by 3000 watts…. 3 kilo watt batteries.

So here we go...

The highest number on the battery does NOT mean that it lasts longer, goes faster, or goes further.

Volts (V) describe how quickly electrons can jump around inside your battery.

The higher the (V) the faster your eBike can go. A 48v eBike should go faster than 36v eBike etc.

But just because your battery can sprint, does not, unfortunately, mean it can last for a marathon or even get you up a hill.

Therefore, you should NOT make a buying decision based ONLY on Volts.

Amps are a measure of Force.

Amp Hours (Ah) tells you how many Amps a battery can maintain the force of, For One Hour. This is a super important feature that you need to note when considering your purchase. Most e-Bike batteries are either remarked as 10 Amp hours or 20 Amp hours (Ah).

Amp Hours (Ah) needs to be multiplied by one other battery measure, and THAT sum will enable you to figure out whether it will be a great or an average battery.

Please read the examples after you’ve read the formula, so you absolutely understand why the formula is so critically important to your buying decision, and the advertising might never trick you again.

The multiplication of Volts by Amp Hours gives you Watt Hours (Wh) and this is the number to look out for, in e-Bike descriptions. The formula is (v X ah = wh)

If Watt Hours (Wh) are not shown in battery spec, it could be because the battery is Not great, but knowing this formula, you can now very quickly discover it for any battery.

A practical real-life example….

Let’s say a battery is advertised as having 36 Volts (36v) and with 10 Amp Hours (10 Ah)

The simple formula of multiplying Volts by Amp Hours will give you 10 X 36 = 360-watt hours.

That will give you 360 watts of energy for one full hour…. (Batteries are generally rounded to numbers like ; 250w, 350w, 500w, 1000w etc.. so this one would be a 350w).

But what the hell, or where the hell, does 350w get me, I hear you ask ?

So, the battery can deliver 350 watts for 1 hour. That means you could be nicely cruising on your e bike, and probably calling constantly for a mid-level of assistance from your battery for one hour, before it starts to weaken.

Now let’s say you want to give it a lash, with you barely turning the pedals yourself. The battery could deliver you its highest level of assistance with a burst of twice the wattage but for half the time…. So you might enjoy the quick hit of super powers of 700 watts, but only for 30 mins, before it starts to weaken.

And finally if you’re out for a spin, pedaling a little bit harder, and calling for a very low level of assistance from that battery, it could be giving you love in the form of only 175w of assistance, but that love could give you a comfy feeling for 2 hours.

This is the reality of e bike and e scooter batteries today. On a personal note, you may be surprised or relieved, to learn that I actually have an e Bike, and I absolutely love it.

Please feel free to send / share this with your friends, and with my compliments.

Best regards,
Eddie.
Gifts4cyclists.com
Voltage equates to Force. (Let's say, Head Pressure)
Amperage equates to Rate of Flow.