Any hub motor e-bike recs for my farm?

Matto

New Member
Hello! Thanks in advance for your advice. I'm looking for an e-bike for use at our steep farm as a quieter alternative to our gas UTV when not needing to haul or tow. I know a mid-drive will suit my needs but are there geared-hub motor models out there that fit the following bill:
  • Fat tire
  • Capable of throttle-only hill starts and ascents up to 15% and 3/8 mile dirt and grass trails, occasionally steeper at times.
  • Under $2,500
  • Range not a big factor, all rides less than 10 miles, most less than 5.
  • Pedaling will be limited.
Thanks again!
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Not going to get brand specific. There's just too many variables. In my mind though, the winner here is going to be a geared rear hub with the biggest (highest wattage) motor. One other variable might be tire diameter. The smaller diameter (20-24") tires are going to provide additional leverage for the motor when compared to a 26" (all else being equal). The downside of smaller tires will be their ability to roll over rough terrain - like you might find riding across fields with no trail for instance.

The reason the mid drives might work out better is their advantage when it come to gearing. They can get away with a much smaller motor because of that.
 

Matto

New Member
Thank you for some great information. I don't want to start a debate but some model recommendations from those with experience in similar settings would be very helpful. I'd hate to fork out the money for one that sounds good on paper but can't actually do what I need it to. Thanks in advance, again.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Might help to know if you will be riding mostly single track trails on your property, or "cross country" through fields?
 

Matto

New Member
Mostly dirt or tall-mowed grass ridge roads/trails used by UTV and mid-sized tractor, but often steep. Occasional gravel roads, no pavement. Very little cross country use across tall vegetation. One bike under $2500 that comes to mind, outside mid-drive, is Ariel Class D. Looking for additional recommendations. Thanks!
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
OK, so you aren't thinking of a standard 26" bike then.

Are you OK doing any work that might be required on this new bike in person, or will you be relying on a bike shop/dealer?

Check out the Rad's. They have a couple that might interest you - including their new cargo bike.
You won't beat RAD from an available on line support standpoint
 

Matto

New Member
I'm OK with some work myself and not ruling out 26". Concern with the Rads was if they would have the torque needed on my hills for throttle-only starts and ascents.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Are you looking at the direct drive rear hub that comes with the 'City, or the gear driven rear hubs that come with the rest of the line up?
 

Matto

New Member
Really wasn't looking at any of the Rads as I had understood they were underpowered for my needs.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure what you were looking at, but thinking there might be some confusion or bad info involved.

No, not the most powerful available, but I would not count them out completely....
 

Tars Tarkas

Active Member
15% grade isn't much. As for a throttle start, a lot will depend on how much you weigh and what other load you might be carrying. Between me and what I normally haul around, I put about 200 lbs on my Rad Rover and it will do what you're talking about.

I see what AHicks is saying about smaller tires, and that makes sense.

TT
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Yes, for sure! The smaller tires will be an advantage, especially from a standing start!

Another thought. Throttle availability. Will the pedals have to be turning prior to the throttle being available? Some do. They don't allow the throttle to be used if the pedals haven't been turned, so it's not really available from the start. Silly logic behind that for me, but it makes sense to somebody....
 

FlatSix911

Well-Known Member
Hello! Thanks in advance for your advice. I'm looking for an e-bike for use at our steep farm as a quieter alternative to our gas UTV when not needing to haul or tow. I know a mid-drive will suit my needs but are there geared-hub motor models out there that fit the following bill:
  • Fat tire
  • Capable of throttle-only hill starts and ascents up to 15% and 3/8 mile dirt and grass trails, occasionally steeper at times.
  • Under $2,500
  • Range not a big factor, all rides less than 10 miles, most less than 5.
  • Pedaling will be limited.
Thanks again!

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Lumr

New Member
I would strongly recommend keeping cost down by going with an older, used 26" hard tail (front suspension) bike and go with large knobby tires aka 2.25x26" and disc brakes. You can probably pick up a used bike on eBay for under $500 and add on a Bafang BBSHD (this is the better motor as far as reliability) but also at 1000W with tons of torque which will easily pull up steeper inclines. Paired with a 48V/13Ah battery for 10 mile rides should fill the bill. Bike and Bafang with battery will be under $2,000. This is not a geared hub setup but if you program the Bafang correctly with something like JPLabs el settings, you can get away with staying in one mid-range gear on your rear cassette and just use the thumb switch to shift between PAS levels. I chose the JPLabs setting because some of the other popular settings will tend to pull wheelies too easily. With JPLab settings, just press buttons to get more power while climbing. I use a 42T front chainring and 10 speed 11-34 rear cassette. Here is the scenario: when I get to an incline, I downshift the rear to a mid-gear and as I start climbing and the hill gets steeper, I do not downshift...I just increase the PAS level going from 3 to 4 to 5 to 6 and up. This is a sweet setup. I have this setup on my full suspension bike and recumbent trike now and riding them is really enjoyable. May not be what you listed as your requirements but definitely a doable and workable solution at a decent price.
 

JoeVirginia

New Member
Your post caught my eye, since it is similar to my situation. I live on a 50ac horse farm in VA. Have some low grade hills and originally wanted to stay around $2,500 for something to have fun around the farm on my woods trails and mowed grass fields. Would also use on our stone road that goes out to our paved neighborhood roads. Leaning towards the Biktrix ultra 1000 due to the mid-drive and probably put on the 27.5 3” tires. That will land me a little north of $2,700. Anyone have thoughts on this? I ride a mountain bike around property now and will probably just stick mostly to the PAS, but like that this one has the throttle if needed.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
If you want it right away, go with the Wallke X3 for 1800 delivered next week and if you want to wait a bit, look at Sonders or Frey...


 

Thomas Jaszewski

Well-Known Member
I'd be looking at 2wd similar to these.
 

Taylor57

Well-Known Member
I'd be looking at 2wd similar to these.

He did mention his budget was 2500
 

Lumr

New Member
Just to be sure...I mention an older 26" bike because the bottom bracket is located up front more than the newer bikes. The BB0S2 or BBSHD can than be installed a little higher for ground clearancen as it will be raised a bit. Price will easily be under $2,000.