Any Nuvinci failures here?

MLB

Well-Known Member
When Nuvinci first came out they were very fragile and couldn't take a lot of torque (even leg power alone!) and there were seemingly quite a few failures. 5 years ago or so.
But it was a new design, new technology in effect. Other internal hubs WERE also more "fragile" than solid and cheap cassette setups. Besides being much more expensive.
For Regular bikes they make tremendous sense, the difference in being able to stay in the PERFECT GEAR FOR YOU is just huge given our puny power output peddling alone. Almost hard to explain how much stronger that makes you. Less advatages on an electric bike since the motor lets gear selection be much much much less critical to your comfort and range.
Now they seem to be becoming very popular with new Ebikes. Several generations of models have passed and so I'm wondering how they are holding up?
 

Matt A

Member
When Nuvinci first came out they were very fragile and couldn't take a lot of torque (even leg power alone!) and there were seemingly quite a few failures. 5 years ago or so.
But it was a new design, new technology in effect. Other internal hubs WERE also more "fragile" than solid and cheap cassette setups. Besides being much more expensive.
For Regular bikes they make tremendous sense, the difference in being able to stay in the PERFECT GEAR FOR YOU is just huge given our puny power output peddling alone. Almost hard to explain how much stronger that makes you. Less advatages on an electric bike since the motor lets gear selection be much much much less critical to your comfort and range.
Now they seem to be becoming very popular with new Ebikes. Several generations of models have passed and so I'm wondering how they are holding up?
I know this is older and no one ever responded, but I bought an ebike with the NuVinci about a month ago. I definitely like it, but obviously can't comment yet on durability. In the future if you are still wondering you can message me and I will let you know! I do put a lot of miles on, I will be at 10,000 by the time my bike is a year old.
 

Al P

Active Member
Two years and 1700 miles on my N360 and it is working as new. I will say that motor torque makes downshifting on a hill nearly impossible. It feels like you could possibly force it to downshift and break something. The work-around is to stop pedaling briefly and it will easily downshift, or, downshift before starting the climb.