Any RadBurro owners here?

jhoblo

Member
I have a number of questions about how to maintain this bike smarter, rather than work harder as I normally do...
I work witbout help, and this trike will make that challenging. Changing a tire, for one. Can a jack stand be used to do the front tire, and where would you place it not to smash wires?
Stuff like that.
Also, what are your pedal assist capbabilities? My trike may have problems here, but I can’t diagnose them until I replace a console that some @#$%^&*()(*&^% stole the first day I had it parked. The throttle is very powerful.
 

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vilago

New Member
Hi there, don't mean to revive an old post, but you seem to be the only one who has a Radburro for consumer use and doing maintenance solo. Do you have any pointers or suggestions after 2 years of use? I was thinking about getting one of these but worried about changing flats out on the road, and for vandalism/theft as you experienced.

FYI to answer your question on changing the front tire if you never came up with a solution, a motorcycle front stand should work perfectly. Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...&pf_rd_p=edaba0ee-c2fe-4124-9f5d-b31d6b1bfbee

It basically props up the front end underneath the fork.

For the Radburro it seems you have to think "motorcycle" rather than "bicycle" when planning out how you do maintenance...
 

nc1

New Member
BUMP anyone out there have one of these?
Hi, I sold a first edition of the RadBurro this year. The most scary thing about it was its width in traffic- 43”! If you live in an area where this isn’t a problem, then it’s a great way to haul big things around, especially if you don’t have significant hills. It’s fun to ride (IMHO) and you will be noticed! I had one other concern, which was why I ultimately sold it. I bought 2 batteries, and initially the only battery charger available was the one on the trike, and I had to switch these batteries frequently. This meant tipping the cargo box, and although I never had much weight in it the welded part, which attached the box to the trike broke. Tipping the box to access the batteries isn’t a very good design, but again, I was doing it way too often. I thought about buying another box or the pickup style bed to replace the broken box, but I moved to an area with significant hills and cold temps, so I sold it instead. Oh- I used a bottle jack and rv jack stands to work on the brakes, etc. I never had a flat, and that was significant because I was in goathead thorn heaven. Those scooter tires were great! I had no complaints with the Bafang motor, either.
 
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vilago

New Member
Thanks for this! Good to hear you weren't changing flats out on the road. did you ever feel like it was risky to lock up and leave places while going into the store etc? It's got a motorcycle style fork lock but i can't imagine U locking this thing is very practical. Any other pointers/tips? How was visibility with the cargo box etc?
 

nc1

New Member
Sorry for the belated response, I‘ve been out of wifi signal areas trying to avoid severe wildfire smoke. At first I was very worried about someone stealing the RadBurro, but I kept it where it was fairly safe, although it did attract a lot of attention and one questioner even pointed out that I had four beefy locks on it... Yeah, I used a u lock on the frame, and a couple on the rear wheels, and a strong cable on the front wheel. I had limited visibility of traffic behind me with mirrors I added, but I also put vinyl reflective sheets on the cargo box, so it stood out pretty well even after dark! The thing is, it weighed over 300 lbs, so the only way anyone could steal it without everybody seeing it would be to roll it into a truck. The only pointer I could provide offhand is not to remove your battery too often because the welds on the box parts that bolt to the trike aren’t that strong. Also, I hope that RadPower has added front turn signals because it is difficult to brake, change gears, and hand signal your direction especially on a downhill. This is an important safety consideration, as most drivers don’t know what it is and how to deal with It out in traffic.
 

vilago

New Member
Sorry to hear that. I hope you're staying safe from the wildfires. Thanks for that clarity and the tips. I plan on trying motorcycle disc locks on one or both rear wheels to see how that goes. I don't think they added front turn signals but that's a good point and reflectors are a great idea! I guess there's only so much you can do. I don't plan on removing the battery much if at all but that's good to know. Any other pointers? did you ever carry super heavy loads near max capacity or try any other accessories such as the pedicab?