Any RadMini people out there

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Fortunately I had a 5mm spacer in my bike box, so I had a good ride to work and back today, which is 2.5mi each way, for a little while. Tonight I went out on the gravel next to the paved bike trail and I got a flat. I was not prepared with a patch and pump, and it was getting dark. I was only 2 miles from home, and my wife didn't pick up. So I called an uber and folded the bike up for the first time! $9 dollar ride home. I took the battery out and carried it and the bike short distances without a problem. Now I remember why I got the mini. Autopsy at home - the tire and tube were pierced with a half inch gash. Tube and tire were not super thick or high quality, but ok. Something sharp went through there. I immediately ordered some Mr. Tuffy tire liners. It was surprisingly easy to get the rear wheel off, using a stand, but would be a pain on the road. The tire is super easy to get off the wheel. I also ordered a spare tube, but am going to patch this one too. The tubes are like $15.
While you're preparing, you might want to consider getting some tire boots. Really cheap, easy to carry and use. Perfect for larger mishaps. Nice to have the Uber option though! http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-TB-...&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s01

 

mbirds

Member
Thanks JR! Great advice. I was thinking its going to take a long time to inflate one of these with a hand pump so I definitely want to avoid flats whenever possible. With my road bikes its getting enough pressure, with these it's the volume...

I also ordered two Vee Tire Co 20x4 120tpi "Speedster" road tires, I'm sure the stock tires have a pretty low TPI. They have a Memorial Day coupon MEM2016, total cost for two tires shipped was $96. I'll let you guys know how they are.
 

mbirds

Member
Man, it is so hard to get the rear axle back in with the derailleur, chain and disc brakess combined with the weight of the wheel. After researching a bit this problem is not unique to the radmini, but many rear hubmotors. This would be nearly impossible on the side of the road. Even using my bike stand it's difficult. Any tips I'm missing?
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Man, it is so hard to get the rear axle back in with the derailleur, chain and disc brakess combined with the weight of the wheel. After researching a bit this problem is not unique to the radmini, but many rear hubmotors. This would be nearly impossible on the side of the road. Even using my bike stand it's difficult. Any tips I'm missing?
My direct drive hub bike is much heavier than my geared hub bike, so I always break the chain on the former at the master/missing link. It's so much easier without the tension of the derailleur. Make sure you have latex gloves in your road/trail kit, you don't want to be cleaning your hands on your clothes:eek:
 

Tara D.

Active Member
@J.R. bad luck = a crazy redneck in a dragon t shirt with a bb gun and a knife... and takes your beer (the worst part) Nice video thanks for sharing very informative!
 

J.R.

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
@J.R. bad luck = a crazy redneck in a dragon t shirt with a bb gun and a knife... and takes your beer (the worst part) Nice video thanks for sharing very informative!
I like the guy with his Red Ryder BB-Gun, the biker should have said: You'll shoot your eye out! Western Bike Works has some great videos, they use those canned hams to seriously test the durability of the various bags available. They have videos of repair, parts and accessories as well.
 

mbirds

Member
Well, the chain doesn't seem to have a quick link so I ordered a few. Great advice. I've already added latex gloves to my kit. So I'm also waiting on new tires, Mr. Tuffys, and a tube (couldn't get the punctured one to hold a patch). Also ordered some foam blocks to protect the display and controls when the bike is flipped upside-down; I will carry these under the front rack or something. Even with a stand available, upside down low to the ground seems the way to go. At that point, with a breakable chain and protected bars, I think that repairing the rear tire on the side of the road will be theoretically possible. I have changed plenty of rear tires on non-e bikes, but this is a whole other ballgame with this heavy, tight-fitting wheel assembly. But I feel better that a solution is in my grasp. I'll post my impressions of the hopefully stouter tires once I get them. I am not a huge fan of the stock tires now that I have seen them up close; my sense is they are suceptible to flats. I'm not going to complain because there's a reason this bike was so affordable. But disregard my comments about the brakes; the rear tire might be most valuable upgrade. There are not many available, but in addition to the tires I purchased, Specialized makes a 60tpi Ground Control in 20x4. I had never heard of Vee Tire, but I found some reviews of their larger tires and they appear to have a pretty good reputation with mountain bikes.
 

grench

Well-Known Member
Well, the chain doesn't seem to have a quick link so I ordered a few. Great advice. I've already added latex gloves to my kit. So I'm also waiting on new tires, Mr. Tuffys, and a tube (couldn't get the punctured one to hold a patch). Also ordered some foam blocks to protect the display and controls when the bike is flipped upside-down; I will carry these under the front rack or something. Even with a stand available, upside down low to the ground seems the way to go. At that point, with a breakable chain and protected bars, I think that repairing the rear tire on the side of the road will be theoretically possible. I have changed plenty of rear tires on non-e bikes, but this is a whole other ballgame with this heavy, tight-fitting wheel assembly. But I feel better that a solution is in my grasp. I'll post my impressions of the hopefully stouter tires once I get them. I am not a huge fan of the stock tires now that I have seen them up close; my sense is they are suceptible to flats. I'm not going to complain because there's a reason this bike was so affordable. But disregard my comments about the brakes; the rear tire might be most valuable upgrade. There are not many available, but in addition to the tires I purchased, Specialized makes a 60tpi Ground Control in 20x4. I had never heard of Vee Tire, but I found some reviews of their larger tires and they appear to have a pretty good reputation with mountain bikes.
Don't know if you follow some of the other threads but the Gaadi Tube makes for a good temporary solution. Here is a thread where it is discussed.
https://electricbikereview.com/community/threads/must-buy-accessories-items-for-st1.2370/#post-30536
 

mbirds

Member
I wish they made those in this size! So my parts are starting to come in. Here's my plan for the rear wheel:

1. 11T Freewheel to pedal assist at higher speeds
2. Name brand tires
3. Mr Tuffy (8 more oz on the wheel)
4. Better tubes!

The tubes that came on the bike are garbage. Hardest to patch I've ever seen, thin, weird feeling material. My patch still had a slow leak since it wouldn't accept the adhesive, at least that's my theory. Now, I have the Sunlite tube from amazon. It weighs almost 50% more(14.5 oz vs 10oz) and feels like a bike tube should. On it's way is a specialized tube with presta which is hopefully even better. Front wheel will get just a new tube and tire for now. Even though the bike will be maybe a pound heavier, the slick tires may add efficiency... and quieter I imagine.

Some coroplast/zip tie fenders and this thing will be ready to rock and roll :)
 
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NinjaNick

Member
So I have gotten to put 2 long rides on the mini now. First ride was 20 miles and the mini handled it very nicely no issues. The second ride had more up hills and bumps was a bit longer and more taxing on the battery. That ride went awesome as well.

I am confident that it was a faulty controller and after testing out other bikes I feel like the Mini was a great buy!

The tire issue has been on my mind since I bought the bike. Multiple sources confirm thin side walls and low quality tubes. I plan to install new tubes, tires, and rim strips.

Tires (Front & Back):
http://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Cruis...&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00

Tubes:
http://www.amazon.com/Kenda-HEAVY-D...&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00

Rim Strips:
http://www.amazon.com/Sunlite-Rim-S...&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00

Hopefully my replacement spacer is in today so that I can get it installed and not cause a failure. Here is a pick of me and my dog on our ride!

Safe Riding Guys!

Nick
 

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mbirds

Member
Nice pic! I like the baskets. Was the 20 miles mostly battery? Curious about your speeds and level of pedal assist. I got less than 30 miles total on multiple top-offs before my rude wake-up call. Glad you're back on the road. My Vee Tire Speedsters shipped today, so hopefully by next weekend I'll get back out there. Please let us know how the Sunlite tires fit; I was a little concerned that they were 4.25" width, but I imagine they'll fit ok and be even more cushiony.
 

NinjaNick

Member
The reviews for the tires state that 20x4 should work fine with extra inflation and planning for the rim strips. Those specialized tires, look really high quality and nice. Would love an update on that when you can! Also found this crazy rear tire, was thinking about trying it......

http://www.bikemania.biz/tires/chopper/innova-fat-cat-chopper-rear-bicycle-tire-20-x-4-1-4.html

I installed the spacer and took the mini for a short ride and it definitely made a huge difference in squeaking noises produced by the handlebars. This and the warranty on the controller that failed on me, makes me really glad I paid extra to go with a company made bike that is supported and getting recall parts.

I always pedal especially uphills and try to stay conciseness of them so i can get max speed to carry me up. I average about 12-14 MPH on pedal assist 3 which seems to be the one I use most. When I have clear and open space, I will change it to assist 5 and utilize the throttle for tough control situations. My hilly ride was 10 miles one way and I was at about half way with lots of throttle and pedal assist 5. I did not risk trying to get back with out topping off at my friends BBQ. The way home I had way more then half with less hills to climb. At pedal assist 5 I can reach speeds of 19 MPH pretty easy, throttle still offers slightly more speed and will get me to 21 MPH and crush climbs when needed.

On a trip totaling 20 miles with only 285 ft of elevation changes, limited throttle (biking with a person that had no e power!), stayed at pedal assist 3 for the whole way to let my buddy keep up. I had 2 bars left and probably could have done over 30 miles.

Just as a side note, in thinking about upgrading the performance of this bike especially with the battery. I have found similar bikes that use the same style battery....So I am thinking this is a standard type like a dolphin or shark pack. That makes me want to upgrade even sooner! 52v 20AH is mighty tempting!


Rider Weight: 145 lbs
Dog Weight: 9 lbs
Racks: 3 total, 10 lbs
Tools, lock, spare tube: 15 lbs
Water, tarp, food for people and dog: 10 lbs
 

mbirds

Member
Thanks for the info! This shape of battery is known as the "Silver Fish" if you are looking at replacements.

On my rides I've been a lot heavier on the throttle than you, I think. On my 11 mile ride I had 3/5 bars remaining after the battery settled. I averaged 14-15mph on hills and 20 on the flats... I'm really looking forward to having two higher gears on the new freewheel to assist more.

For those who are new to ebikes, the power bars will drop when you apply throttle, even on a full charge. To gauge the remaining power, you have to let it settle and read it when the battery's at rest.

All of my wheel parts are supposed to arrive Thurs, hope to find the time to get it all installed quickly. I miss my evening rides.

here's the tires I ordered:

(Link Removed - No Longer Exists)

and the freewheel ($$$)

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007A8RPUS/ref=s9_dcbhz_bw_g468_i4_sh
 

mbirds

Member
I'm about 90 percent certain, but can confirm probably tomorrow night... The main issue is if the axle or cords get in the way of freewheel removal, but I took a close look at everything before I ordered and it looked OK. The smallest cog on the stock freewheel is 14T, this one has an 11T and a 13T, and the largest is the same as stock. They have ones with lower gears (30, 32T)as well but I didn't think it would be that useful. I ordered the freewheel removal tool from the same manufacturer. The splines look to be a match for the existing freewheel and it is deep.
 

JoePah

Well-Known Member
This Rad mini has 20" tires right?

If you're looking for a practical option to those giant tires, replace with 16" Moped tires.. Moped tires are sized based on rim diameter, and bicycle tires are sized based on tire diameter.

I've used these Shinko tires on my A2B Metro and they fit just fine, they are extremely tough (DOT rated for 75 mph) and are inexpensive.

Would suggest a tire width of 2.5" to 2.75". It might not look as cool but these moped tires will ride smoother, quieter and will be MUCH more reliable than those thin walled fat tires.

https://www.amazon.com/Shinko-SR714...qid=1464788917&sr=1-14&keywords=moped+tire+16
 

mbirds

Member
I will definitely consider that if I get another flat too soon after the upgrades. Those are heavy, but I would consider especially for rear-only. Thanks for posting, I didn't realize people had successfully used scooter tires on a 20" ebike.

Are there other forums where Radmini owners are posting?
 

George S.

Well-Known Member
Court and a shop owner were talking about moped tires on 20 inch bikes during the Juiced ODK video.

 

mbirds

Member
Everything came today. Installed specialized tube and Vee tires, and also a Mr. Tuffy on the back. Unfortunately the freewheel removal tool wouldn't fit over the big axle nut, and the nut won't fit over the plug! So I will have to cut and then re-solder the motor plug and didn't feel like doing it today.

The new tires are nice. They inflate a little narrower but are "taller" effectively increasing the diameter a little bit. The motor is not so bad to install when you open up the chain. Test ride tonight.

IMG_20160602_185113462.jpg IMG_20160602_183403916.jpg
 

Scottv

New Member
Hi Mbirds,

Instead of cutting wires coming out of the motor I would recommend cutting the freewheel removal tool in half. This way you won't have to risk harming any of the electronics on the bike.
 

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