Any red flags?

Entropy

New Member
TL;DR I'm on $3500 budget shopping for a fairly capiable e-mtb. Found a company called Nireeka, Seems kinda sketch. Any thoughts? Other options that I could go with?

Hullo,

I've been shopping around for an ebike for around or under $3500, that provides a large battery, powerful motor, ect. ect. What I came up with that fit approximately what I wanted was the Nireeka Prime- A supposed spec monster. I was elated at first, but now that I look into it, It doesn't seem that legitimate. So, I wanted to ask if anybody Has experience with their bikes, and what you guys here think of it.

Website: https://nireeka.com/

After some closer inspection, and some questions, I've found a few sketchy things, starting with what I beileve to be 'meh' and going up from there:

-No irl locations to "test drive" the bikes. As most manufactures, say 'that's to lower costs,' but still.

-Sales last forever. They say they're on sale, they aren't. I questioned staff multiple times on when they would end, they touted a time, the sales didn't disappear

-No reviews, or Media coverage. So far after... like 2 months of on-and-off research, I've only found three reviews of ANY nireeka bike, and one of those reviewers may very well be sponsored or "employed" by Nireeka...

-The prices. They charge seemingly ridiculously low prices for what they provide. 840Wh (17.5ah 48v) battery? $500, and supposedly manufactured by lg. Bangfang 1000w motor? $600. Air Magnesium Suspension Fork? $249. Carbon Fiber Prime frame? $699. Seems pretty low compared other ebike manufacturers/brands.

-Shipping times. The Expected shipping time is 2-3 months, which is longer than the allotted time for you to dispute a charge on your credit card if a product isn't as it was supposed to be.

Does anybody have any thoughts on these observations? Would you still reccomend going with these bikes? Are there some other options out there that can compete?

Thanks.
 

Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
TL;DR I'm on $3500 budget shopping for a fairly capiable e-mtb. Found a company called Nireeka, Seems kinda sketch. Any thoughts? Other options that I could go with?

Hullo,

I've been shopping around for an ebike for around or under $3500, that provides a large battery, powerful motor, ect. ect. What I came up with that fit approximately what I wanted was the Nireeka Prime- A supposed spec monster. I was elated at first, but now that I look into it, It doesn't seem that legitimate. So, I wanted to ask if anybody Has experience with their bikes, and what you guys here think of it.

Website: https://nireeka.com/

After some closer inspection, and some questions, I've found a few sketchy things, starting with what I beileve to be 'meh' and going up from there:

-No irl locations to "test drive" the bikes. As most manufactures, say 'that's to lower costs,' but still.

-Sales last forever. They say they're on sale, they aren't. I questioned staff multiple times on when they would end, they touted a time, the sales didn't disappear

-No reviews, or Media coverage. So far after... like 2 months of on-and-off research, I've only found three reviews of ANY nireeka bike, and one of those reviewers may very well be sponsored or "employed" by Nireeka...

-The prices. They charge seemingly ridiculously low prices for what they provide. 840Wh (17.5ah 48v) battery? $500, and supposedly manufactured by lg. Bangfang 1000w motor? $600. Air Magnesium Suspension Fork? $249. Carbon Fiber Prime frame? $699. Seems pretty low compared other ebike manufacturers/brands.

-Shipping times. The Expected shipping time is 2-3 months, which is longer than the allotted time for you to dispute a charge on your credit card if a product isn't as it was supposed to be.

Does anybody have any thoughts on these observations? Would you still reccomend going with these bikes? Are there some other options out there that can compete?

Thanks.
3500$ is a decent sized budget. You would serve yourself well to go check out the offerings from Trek, Specialized and Giant.
 

Dallant

Well-Known Member
IMO the question is how willing and able are you to do most/all of the work on this bike? If you are, go for it but remember getting parts is still part of the equation. If you aren’t, ask some friends/acquaintances who have ebikes or look around where you live for good ebike shops and do your shopping there. Good luck!
 

percymon

Active Member
From what i can see of the company they are entirely internet based, including customer service tickets - they seem to be based in the UAE. I'm guessing they are Chinese made bikes, as are a lot of the 'unknown brand' ebikes - that probably means out there somewhere on alibaba/aliexpress or dhgate there are spares if you needed them. You may wait longer for them via the company than buying yourself,; of course you need to identify what may be at fault and fix yourself, maybe waiting months for parts to arrive. Magnesium air fork for $249 - you pays your money, your choice; theres a reason big branded reputable firms charge %600 plus, and its not just margin and marketing costs.

With your budget just have a look at local shops, if nothing else to see what your money buys in retail shop bikes - they might not have the same spec count, but you'll have local and regional company support. If a frame were to crack or a motor fail, you have a local warranty with local shop support for repair. You might not get a carbon frame or a mega watt motor, but where's the fun in buying a decent priced bike that technically can't perform on woodland trails etc.
 

CodyDog

Well-Known Member
I would be very cautious going in on this bike. The first thing I'll always recommend is buying a bike from a LBS. Unfortunately $3500 is on the low end for a quality EMTB (hard to believe but it is). $5,000 is the starting point for a quality FS EMTB. Now if you are just riding dirt roads and pavement, you can get some life out of a bike with entry level components.

Real mountain biking requires a decent group set, decent suspension, proven mid drive motor, great brakes and very strong battery mount (preferably in the frame) This bike offers none of that.

P.S. The better EMTB motors are rated 250w with a higher torque rating (75-90nm).
 

reed scott

Well-Known Member
I would be very cautious going in on this bike. The first thing I'll always recommend is buying a bike from a LBS. Unfortunately $3500 is on the low end for a quality EMTB (hard to believe but it is). $5,000 is the starting point for a quality FS EMTB. Now if you are just riding dirt roads and pavement, you can get some life out of a bike with entry level components.

Real mountain biking requires a decent group set, decent suspension, proven mid drive motor, great brakes and very strong battery mount (preferably in the frame) This bike offers none of that.

P.S. The better EMTB motors are rated 250w with a higher torque rating (75-90nm).
Good post. I won't really quibble but your last sentence, to my mind, needs a qualifier. Putting together 'Better' and '250 watts' is an oxymoron to many of us. :)
 

percymon

Active Member
Power is nothing without control - it's about useable power and transmitting it efficiently. I think the video review says it all, its capable on fire roads or gravel track / tarmac. Throw some proper muddy mountain trails at it might be a much different story, its got some weight to steer.

Some Giant bikes in your budget range..

Hardtail https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/fathom-eplus-3-power

Full Susp https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/stance-eplus-2-power or https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/stance-eplus-2-2021


Trek only really have one model around budget (3 different colours).. https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/...ail/powerfly-4/p/32844/?colorCode=orange_grey



Your biggest issue, even with the big brands, will be finding stock(s), but if nothing else you should be able to find a few dealers within an hours drive that have some models/frames that you can at least try out for size/fit/geometry etc.
 
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Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
IMO the question is how willing and able are you to do most/all of the work on this bike? If you are, go for it but remember getting parts is still part of the equation. If you aren’t, ask some friends/acquaintances who have ebikes or look around where you live for good ebike shops and do your shopping there. Good luck!
Exactly this , the big three Trek, specialized and Giant have tremendous buying power so they get first dibs on all components and spares compared to small internet ebike companies. And he won’t have to look/beg for shops to work on his ebike when the inevitable happens.

And ofcourse imo they have better ebikes compared to the internet only brands.
 

Sierratim

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Nevada City, CA & Paradise Valley, AZ
Good post. I won't really quibble but your last sentence, to my mind, needs a qualifier. Putting together 'Better' and '250 watts' is an oxymoron to many of us. :)
The 250W rating many mid-drive motors publish is to a Euro standard that, as I understand it, specifies max power at continuous load under a fairly high ambient temp. Some of these same motors have bench test data showing peak power in the 560W range. The Specialized app offers a power meter function. At my peak effort with motor assist at max the power meter reports peak motor power at 800W. Not bad from a 250W rated motor...😎
mceclip10.png
Data published several years ago, some motors have updated performance curves.
 

Entropy

New Member
3500$ is a decent sized budget. You would serve yourself well to go check out the offerings from Trek, Specialized and Giant.
Trek and Specialized are out of budget. for $3500 I'm not even sure if you can get front suspension from Trek, and Unless I go with an Older model or used, the cheapest emtb specialized makes atm is the levo, at $5000. Giant has bikes In my price range, but I'm not totally sure about them Ty for the help though :)
 

Entropy

New Member
I would be very cautious going in on this bike. The first thing I'll always recommend is buying a bike from a LBS. Unfortunately $3500 is on the low end for a quality EMTB (hard to believe but it is). $5,000 is the starting point for a quality FS EMTB. Now if you are just riding dirt roads and pavement, you can get some life out of a bike with entry level components.

Real mountain biking requires a decent group set, decent suspension, proven mid drive motor, great brakes and very strong battery mount (preferably in the frame) This bike offers none of that.

P.S. The better EMTB motors are rated 250w with a higher torque rating (75-90nm).
Well what do you define as 'real?' Downhill? (lol) Trails? Can you be specific?

Hmm... In that case what do you think about the trek powerfly fs5 and the specialized levo (base)?
 

Akrotiri

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
Trek and Specialized are out of budget. for $3500 I'm not even sure if you can get front suspension from Trek, and Unless I go with an Older model or used, the cheapest emtb specialized makes atm is the levo, at $5000. Giant has bikes In my price range, but I'm not totally sure about them Ty for the help though :)
I think the powerfly4 falls around 3500$ and it has quality front suspension, Bosch motor and battery, Trek support and good looks.

Why risk purchasing an ebike which will have abysmal build quality, awkward looks and zero support and is being sold by a fly by night company based in Dubai that will be non-existent after they ( or just he ) rid all their existing bike stock, make a tidy profit and move on to the next business venture.


 
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Nova Haibike

Well-Known Member
Giant has bikes In my price range, but I'm not totally sure about them
As someone who has worked on bikes professionally for decades, I scratch my head and sometimes curse design choices made by Giant. But I can say that about any company, really. One thing I am sure of though is that Giant builds a quality product second to none. While most brands contract with producers in China to build their frames, Giant manufactures their own product, all the way down to smelting of ore into alloys and making the tubes, or rolling their own carbon fiber sheets. They have complete control over their frames and I think they make an excellent product.
 

CodyDog

Well-Known Member
Well what do you define as 'real?' Downhill? (lol) Trails? Can you be specific?
Drops, jumps, roots, rock gardens and such are what I would expect as defining criteria for "real" mountain biking. All of these things transmit a shock load to group sets, suspensions, battery mounts and other components. Lower end components don't do well with constant hits and shocks. I know from experience.

My first ebike purchase was just under $2K and I was extremely disappointed for use on trails. It has now become my in town bike. My second mountain bike (not an ebike but analog)) was a Rocky Mountain Altitude that cost $3,400 which was considered just mid level for an analog MTB. Where I'm going with this is how can a manufacture offer an electric mountain bike for $2K under a mid level analog MTB?

A lot of these companies represent their budget bikes as mountain bikes with powerful motors and full suspension. They're typically heavy, use heavy sprig shocks, entry level group sets (that should be used for casual street riding), low end brakes (all hydraulic disc brakes are not equal), Cheep wheel sets, hub motors, etc....


Hmm... In that case what do you think about the trek powerfly fs5 and the specialized levo (base)?
Both have worthy components, group sets and suspensions. Both are good mountain bikes. I ride a Specialized Levo Comp.
 
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CodyDog

Well-Known Member
Good post. I won't really quibble but your last sentence, to my mind, needs a qualifier. Putting together 'Better' and '250 watts' is an oxymoron to many of us. :)
I should have been more specific. Most of the mid to upper end EMTB's our out fitted with a 250 watt rated motors My Levo Comp has a Bosch 250 rated motor and I climb a lot of steep rocky trails and it delivers plenty of power. I would argue that it is one of the best mid drive motors on the market. My wife's Como 3.0 has the Bosch 1.2 and delivers plenty of power as for riding on the street ( 28 mph )

The point I was attempting to make was don't get caught up with the larger 500 and 740 watt motors.
 

steve mercier

Well-Known Member
As someone who has worked on bikes professionally for decades, I scratch my head and sometimes curse design choices made by Giant. But I can say that about any company, really. One thing I am sure of though is that Giant builds a quality product second to none. While most brands contract with producers in China to build their frames, Giant manufactures their own product, all the way down to smelting of ore into alloys and making the tubes, or rolling their own carbon fiber sheets. They have complete control over their frames and I think they make an excellent product.
Agreed, but where they choose to cut corners in order to to keep the price down is sometimes questionable. For example on the Explore 2 and the Liv Amiti the control pads could be better and do not like rain. Some of the stock tires are junk. On the other hand the lights are very good and the grips and pedals are more than acceptable which is not always the case even on high priced bikes.