Anyone add a suspension fork on Como?

Mr. Breeze

New Member
Has anyone retro-fitted their ridged Como fork with a suspension front fork?

I ride a Turbo Levo full suspension MTB, but I picked up a couple 2020 Como's for my wife and myself. (didn't go with the Vado as she didn't care for the riding position as much as the Como)
Many of the trails we ride aren't paved, and while aren't MTB single track, they can be rough. I have installed Kinekt suspension post on both, which helps the comfort a great deal, but would also like to fit a suspension fork and was curious if anyone has done this? Did you go with the same SunTour Mobie or NEX-E as used on the Vado or something else?

Thanks!
Scott in Scottsdale
 

Teddcl

Member
Hi Scott, I put a Redshift stem on my Como and it works great. Much simpler than swapping out the fork IMG_20200705_132859329_kindlephoto-530731611.jpg.

Tedd in the twin cities
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Did you go with the same SunTour Mobie
It is not available aftermarket. I wouldn't replace the Como fork. It is hard to find a good and matching replacement fork for that e-bike. Not having the front shock also makes the bike more lightweight. The universal advice: inflate your Como tyres just to 50 psi (55 max) and you are well-off on the gravel. I know better as my specific Vado model came with the rigid fork and I can live with it easily.

You might replace the handlebars with the Baramind BAM Trek, the shock absorbing ones. Also, consider replacing the grips with Ergon GP3. The beauty of these grips is you can hold the bars by bar-ends as if you were driving a car. The hold can be very delicate and it makes the ride very easy on hands, arms, and head (hardly any vibration experienced). Since I ride long trips with such a configuration, you can trust me. (With speed bumps it is better to stand on pedals for awhile).

Stefan in Brwinów at the Podkowa Leśna border :)
 

Mr. Breeze

New Member
Thanks for the suggestions with regard to stems and bars. (BTW Tedd, I'm originally from the Twin Cities - moved to AZ 14 years ago)
My concern was less about comfort and more about control on rough, rocky, rutted, loose desert trails that a suspension fork will provide. My wife doesn't care for the riding position of a mountain bike, otherwise I'd switch her to a Levo. So like the Vado (and some Como's sold in the UK) I thought a fork change would be an option for her to keep the upright riding position, but yet better control on the rougher trails. I have changed the tires to the Schwalbe Marathon Plus - they have a center spine for easy rolling and more aggressive tread for better grip in the loose.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Don't make a mistake Scott. Have you replaced the 2.3" with equally thick Marathons? I can tell you I can ride my Vado with 2" tyres in pretty rough terrain and don't feel I have no control. The only situation when I feel some stability issues is at speed exceeding 28 mph on descents (asphalt).

P. S. Marathon e-Plus have stability issues on paving.
 

Mr. Breeze

New Member
Thanks Stefan. Yes, the Marathon Plus 486 smart guards are 2.25" so nearly identical width to the stock Nimbus II Sport Reflect's. I've been running them on my Como and while they aren't as grippy on the desert loose gravel as the Maxxis Aggressors/Minion's I run on my Levo, they are far better than the Nimbus II Sport Reflects when it comes to anything more than asphalt. I run them on the lower end of the recommended pressure as I'm less concerned with rolling resistance (it's an e-bike after all) and more with some shock absorbing. I run Ergon grips on all - they are the best!
 

Mr. Breeze

New Member
Well, it looks like I may be alone in looking to put a suspension front fork on the Como. It may be simpler to sell the Como's and buy a Vado's.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Well, it looks like I may be alone in looking to put a suspension front fork on the Como. It may be simpler to sell the Como's and buy a Vado's.
You're not alone. Don't think the Mobie front fork in Vado is any good... And that is non-replaceable either. If you need a bike that has a good sus fork, buy an e-MTB...
 

Mr. Breeze

New Member
You're not alone. Don't think the Mobie front fork in Vado is any good... And that is non-replaceable either. If you need a bike that has a good sus fork, buy an e-MTB...
That's why I have a Levo - full suspension e-MTB, but my bride doesn't like the riding position of a MTB - thus, I got us Como's for when we ride together. They are fine on smooth paved roads/trails, we do take them on some mild single track and could use some suspension to aid in bike control. The suspension seat post does well in providing comfort, but doesn't do anything with regard to bike control.
 

Brendon@TBSM

Well-Known Member
That's why I have a Levo - full suspension e-MTB, but my bride doesn't like the riding position of a MTB - thus, I got us Como's for when we ride together. They are fine on smooth paved roads/trails, we do take them on some mild single track and could use some suspension to aid in bike control. The suspension seat post does well in providing comfort, but doesn't do anything with regard to bike control.

A couple thoughts having swapped forks on one of our shop Vado's.

Make sure to measure the axle to crown as well as the offset of the fork. If those aren't on the money the bike ride will suffer which is one of the things that makes the Specialized bikes known for what they are.

I might make more sense to get Vado's and match the upright fit and bars to the Como. Can be done no prob. On my shop Vado 5.0 I run Como bars because I like the sweep. You might need to run longer hoses/shift cable, but that's not that big of a deal. Also of note, the Como has a very different ride due to the larger tire, the Vado uses a larger but smaller tire. A more sporting ride but you will probably want a suspension seatpost like a Thudbuster or something to chill out the shock through the saddle.
 

Mr. Breeze

New Member
A couple thoughts having swapped forks on one of our shop Vado's.

Make sure to measure the axle to crown as well as the offset of the fork. If those aren't on the money the bike ride will suffer which is one of the things that makes the Specialized bikes known for what they are.

I might make more sense to get Vado's and match the upright fit and bars to the Como. Can be done no prob. On my shop Vado 5.0 I run Como bars because I like the sweep. You might need to run longer hoses/shift cable, but that's not that big of a deal. Also of note, the Como has a very different ride due to the larger tire, the Vado uses a larger but smaller tire. A more sporting ride but you will probably want a suspension seatpost like a Thudbuster or something to chill out the shock through the saddle.

Thanks for the comments Brendon. More to consider!
 

SoCalDave

Member
Don't make a mistake Scott. Have you replaced the 2.3" with equally thick Marathons? I can tell you I can ride my Vado with 2" tyres in pretty rough terrain and don't feel I have no control. The only situation when I feel some stability issues is at speed exceeding 28 mph on descents (asphalt).

P. S. Marathon e-Plus have stability issues on paving.
What are the Marathon E-Plus stability issues on paving? I am thinking of buying some when my current tires wear out.
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
What are the Marathon E-Plus stability issues on paving? I am thinking of buying some when my current tires wear out.
I can only say something about the 42-622 size. When that size Marathons e-Plus (inflated almost to the max allowable pressure) ride paving made of concrete blocks, these tyres behave in a weird way, like they were unstable. Deflate to mid pressure and everything is OK.
 

Mr. Breeze

New Member
What are the Marathon E-Plus stability issues on paving? I am thinking of buying some when my current tires wear out.
I run mine at 30psi - no problems with grip although I live in the desert so no experience in the rain. There are many reviews of them out there on the interweb.
 

BarryS

Active Member
IMO Front shocks are over rated : On Mountain Bikes yeah : But on Urban Hybrids :It's the Butt that takes the Beating : If you're hitting holes in the road that require suspension : Maybe you need an MTB My Dual Sport Suspention works great But does create Drag. The best Upgrade I have ever made was the Redshift Sports Seat Post : Bulky Padded shorts no need no more
 

dlee

Member
After riding a Como for 3K miles and contending with the stiffest frame I've ever ridden, then getting the front shock of the new Vado dialed in, my vote is for the Vado ride.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Very cool. I expected the Vado to be the stiffer, judging by the threads about an uncomfortable Vado ride and the weight forward ? geometry.
 

Brendon@TBSM

Well-Known Member
Very cool. I expected the Vado to be the stiffer, judging by the threads about an uncomfortable Vado ride and the weight forward ? geometry.

Stiffness between the Como and Vado are the same but the Como has a more relaxed geometry thus feeling more compliant. Both benefit from a suspension seatpost from what I can tell based on what our clients want. The Vado is more "bike" like versus the Como being more "cruiser" like, more upright, etc. That said both can be fitted for a variety of riders. The larger wheels of the Vado is what wins over lots of folks, the larger tires of the Como offer others the compliance they want.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
After riding a Como for 3K miles and contending with the stiffest frame I've ever ridden, then getting the front shock of the new Vado dialed in, my vote is for the Vado ride.
How did dialed in work out for you...and am I correct that you're a rather lightweight rider?