Anyone Own Como 4 or Como 5

Rick53

Active Member
I am debating on whether I need a class 3 Bike or Not : There's no place anywhere near to me (within 100 miles) for me to test ride one. I've looked at Verve Plus from Trek , At the Vado and The Como : Can anyone give me personal experience .

Maybe where you have Class 1 and wish it was Class 3 or even Visa Versa

Videos don't reveal how much effort it takes to get past 20MPH on flats : I am wondering if a Class 1 would be a waste of Money : I am currently using a Regular Non E-bike Verve 3 . With teh right conditions on Flats I can maintain 14 MPH fairly easily :

So thinking a Class 1 just won't be any fun .

Last thing to mention : I ride for pleasure : Live in the country with miles of Open rode and various terrains : ON country Graveled Blacktop Going 14 MPH takes more effort . I have gotten My none electric Verve 3 with dual chairing up to 18MPH on flats : But this is just a speed I can take off and peek at .

For those with the Class 3 Como's : Is 25-28 MPH average Speed un-realistic ?

Just trying to get an idea of the effort it takes to maintain over 20MPH speeds : On group rides with NON Electrics on a 20-30 mile round Trip > It always says I averaged around 9.9 MPH >

Averages when I ride alone are 11-13 MPH.

So who has good experience with Class 1 or Class 3 or maybe Both :
 

wallrich525

New Member
I just learned today that a national seashore near me only allows Class 1 bikes on its trails. That’s a real issue for me since that would take away one of my reasons for an ebike. It might be worth sacrificing a few extra miles. Most people enjoy the spedelec just to comfortably get to 22-23 mph. Getting to 28 mph is often a real stretch.
 

Rick53

Active Member
I just learned today that a national seashore near me only allows Class 1 bikes on its trails. That’s a real issue for me since that would take away one of my reasons for an ebike. It might be worth sacrificing a few extra miles. Most people enjoy the spedelec just to comfortably get to 22-23 mph. Getting to 28 mph is often a real stretch.
How do you know it's a stretch? This is what is frustrating by not having anywhere to go test one out. It may be I would find to get to even 24-25 would require peak effort I suppose it depends on the Bike : Most of My interest would be in what we'd call Hybrid in a Regular Bike
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
For those with the Class 3 Como's : Is 25-28 MPH average Speed un-realistic ?
From Vado 5.0 user's experience:
Depending on how strong your legs are. Regarding instantaneous speed, up to 24 mph is doable with low effort. Above, you need to try harder or go into Turbo mode that drains your battery fast. The average speed is always lower that the instant speed unless you can ride really long road stretches without slowing down or stopping.


How do you know it's a stretch?
There is a certain number of watts necessary to be at given speed, taking all other parameters such as wind, terrain inclination, face area of the rider/bike etc as constant. 250 watts allows you to achieve certain speed with your symbolic leg power input such as 50 W and the motor does the rest. Unluckily, the faster you need to ride, the power demand grows in cubic power. Above certain speed, let us say 24 mph all that makes it possible to get to 28 mph is maximum motor support plus your own legs. That is why @wallrich525 wrote what he wrote. His observation is correct.
 
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Rick53

Active Member
From Vado 5.0 user's experience:
Depending on how strong your legs are. Regarding instantaneous speed, up to 24 mph is doable with low effort. Above, you need to try harder or go into Turbo mode that drains your battery fast. The average speed is always lower that the instant speed unless you can ride really long road stretches without slowing down or stopping.



There is a certain number of watts necessary to be at given speed, taking all other parameters such as wind, terrain inclination, face area of the rider/bike etc as constant. 250 watts allows you to achieve certain speed with your symbolic leg power input such as 50 W and the motor does the rest. Unluckily, the faster you need to ride, the power demand grows in cubic power. Above certain speed, let us say 24 mph all that makes it possible to get to 28 mph is maximum motor support plus your own legs. That is why @wallrich525 wrote what he wrote. His observation is correct.
So essentially what you are saying : All dependent on My strength : Class one maintaining 17-18 MPH if relatively easy would translate to 23-24 MPH in Class 3/ NM of torque translates to How speedy I could get up to top speed and then slow back down to maintaining an average Speed

SO were I to by a Verve plus : Considering I can average say 11-12MPH on a NON_E Verve 3. I could increase that by 5-6 MPH with the same effort with power : ON a Como or Vado Class 3 : I could comfortably Double that Speed All in consideration of your info.

I did speak with a Sales Rep Who has Both Trek and Specialized : He tells me he has ridden a Como 2 and the 2019 Verve + > He says the COMO 2 was easier to maintain close to 20 Where as the Verve Seems to fight you a little past 17 Miles per hour : He offered to let me Ride his Como 2 When the weather breaks and the snow is off the roads.

IN his opinion he told me Unless I am riding a Longer stretch of Open Road I'll never miss Not having a Class 3 . On trails I see his point :

Curious is the main difference between a Vado 4 and 5 Top Speed Torque ? I realize nicer display etc : But not really concerned with that : I'll likely even take the Fenders off anything I buy :
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Your understanding is basically correct.
Considering my ill legs, I could do about 11-12 mph on my "acoustic" bike and I was very tired after riding 13 miles. My Lovelec e-bike (unrestricted Class 1) can do what a restricted U.S. Class 1 e-bike can do. Normal summer speed on a good road would be up to 19 mph although 17-18 mph is effortless (PAS Level 1). Riding Vado 5 means effortless 22 mph and the 24 mph requires more cadence. Riding Vado at these speeds requires (in my case) the Sport mode, that is, PAS Level 2.

Interestingly, I feel riding the Sport mode appears necessary for speed and comfort on the Vado. The Eco mode feels somewhat sluggish and you start wondering if you have chosen the right e-bike. The Sport mode makes Vado agile, fast accelerating and maintaining good speed; and riding is fun.

Regarding the fenders: the front fender on Specialized e-bikes keeps you dry even during heavy rain. Specialized put a lot of effort into the design of Drytech fenders. The rear fender holds the rear light and the registration plate on speed e-bikes. Just for your information.
 

Rick53

Active Member
Your understanding is basically correct.
Considering my ill legs, I could do about 11-12 mph on my "acoustic" bike and I was very tired after riding 13 miles. My Lovelec e-bike (unrestricted Class 1) can do what a restricted U.S. Class 1 e-bike can do. Normal summer speed on a good road would be up to 19 mph although 17-18 mph is effortless (PAS Level 1). Riding Vado 5 means effortless 22 mph and the 24 mph requires more cadence. Riding Vado at these speeds requires (in my case) the Sport mode, that is, PAS Level 2.

Interestingly, I feel riding the Sport mode appears necessary for speed and comfort on the Vado. The Eco mode feels somewhat sluggish and you start wondering if you have chosen the right e-bike. The Sport mode makes Vado agile, fast accelerating and maintaining good speed; and riding is fun.

Regarding the fenders: the front fender on Specialized e-bikes keeps you dry even during heavy rain. Specialized put a lot of effort into the design of Drytech fenders. The rear fender holds the rear light and the registration plate on speed e-bikes. Just for your information.
It sounds like you may need a stent in your leg somewhere : I had to have that done 8 months ago : It's like I have legs of a 30 year old. I appreciate the Info Curious about the eco mode comment Thanks for you responses
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
It sounds like you may need a stent in your leg somewhere
Unluckily the situation is rather hopeless. I had the stent for a year until it broke. Then I had a grafting surgery. Now, the left leg is bad and the right one is not good. But I can ride electric bikes though ;)
 

Rick53

Active Member
Unluckily the situation is rather hopeless. I had the stent for a year until it broke. Then I had a grafting surgery. Now, the left leg is bad and the right one is not good. But I can ride electric bikes though ;)
WOW sorry to hear that : Mine was actually needed due to an accident : So maybe in a different boat : Also at 6' I am a fairly fit 175lbs : That may also help : Hopefully they can resolve it for u