Anyone put a bigger chainring on their Rover?

Lost

Active Member
I find I am in hi gear almost all the time. Would like to go a little higher at times, just wondering if anyone has done this already. Maybe 46 tooth?
 

windmill

Active Member
I find I am in hi gear almost all the time. Would like to go a little higher at times, just wondering if anyone has done this already. Maybe 46 tooth?
It's a standard square taper bottom bracket, no reason why you couldn't. A freewheel with an 11t low gear is another option.
 

Lost

Active Member
What do we have for a cassette now? With the wire coming out of the hub, I have seen some folks have issues removing the cassette - having to cut the tool in half to get er done. I did see a video where you can change the chainring without taking the BB apart, so there's that.
 

windmill

Active Member
Can someone in the know explain this?
https://www.amazon.com/Sram-Chainring-Force-Rival-Apex/dp/B005ELUNHK/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1489510232&sr=8-3&keywords=46+tooth+chainring&th=1&psc=1
You can chose different chainrings in the drop down. Why does it seem like you can different teeth counts with the same diameter? 130mm with all sorts of different teeth counts. Is the 130mm the mounting pattern?
Yes that is correct, the 130mm is the mounting diameter.

Here's all you'll need to know to make an informed choice. https://www.sheldonbrown.com/cribsheet-bcd.html
 

windmill

Active Member
What do we have for a cassette now? With the wire coming out of the hub, I have seen some folks have issues removing the cassette - having to cut the tool in half to get er done. I did see a video where you can change the chainring without taking the BB apart, so there's that.
I have a Radwagon, so I didn't have any problem as it's wire doesn't exit the axle, can't help you there,, but the tool is fairly cheap if you do need to cut it. Park tool FR-1
https://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-Fr...qid=1489543492&sr=8-2&keywords=park+tool+fr+1

The OE freewheel is a 14-28, Here's an 11-28 freewheel https://www.amazon.com/DNP-Epoch-Fr...id=1489543616&sr=1-1&keywords=11+28+freewheel

It needs a deep well tool to remove it, https://www.amazon.com/DNP-Freewhee...coding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=PDTCADGZEX7CK4JQ2041
 

thatdude902

Active Member
Huh. I always thought the oem was a 11-28 freewheel for some reason. But I just counted and you guys are right, it's a 14-28 freewheel. No wonder I'm always on the highest gear.

So replacing the freewheel is the best option, though replacing the chainring is less work. Btw, the chainring on the rover is 104mm four bolts one. Problem is you need spacers (and maybe new bolts) for a new chainring (bigger ones are usually flat) as the stock chainring is offset a few mm, unless you get rid of the stock bashguard/chainguard.
 

windmill

Active Member
Something you need to check, if the Rover is like the Wagon, the chain ring is riveted to the crank, therefore it would be best to get a new crankset with bolted chain ring.
 

windmill

Active Member
Freewheel it is then. Not looking forward to takng that apart though!
FYI, when I removed the OE freewheel it took major effort to break it free as the factory didn't grease the threads. It may be wise to hit it with some commercial quality penetrating lube the day before.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
The freewheel on the Rover is tricky, I think it's the same situation on the mini also. The wire for the motor comes out of middle of the hub there and is connected to the controller via a connector. The tricky part is getting freewheel tool pass that connector to get to the freewheel. I measured that connector at 18mm diameter.

I've seen people talk about splitting the freewheel tool, others talk about using method that destroys the old freewheel as seen on youtube. What I have in mind is making the hole in the freewheel tool bigger. That DNP freewheel tool linked above is supposed to have a 14mm hole. I should be able to take a small round grinding stone on a dremel tool and take it up to 18mm. It's going to be time consuming. But I think splitting a freewheel tool would be time consuming also.
 

windmill

Active Member
The opening in my Park tool is 20mm in the body, and 10mm in the hex head for a depth of 10mm. 18mm is equivalent to a 11/16 drill bit.

If you know somebody with a drill press, or milling machine, that is probably the best way to go as it is heat treated tool steel, and its likely the DNP tool is too. Having it done shouldn't cost much at a fabrication, or machine shop, and would be a worthwhile investment as the freewheel is a wear item that will eventually need to be replaced.

I have read that the opening in the DNP tool might actually close to 19mm, but there is conflicting claims too.
 
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triggeraa

New Member
42T Shimano chainring.
 

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The freewheel on the Rover is tricky, I think it's the same situation on the mini also. The wire for the motor comes out of middle of the hub there and is connected to the controller via a connector. The tricky part is getting freewheel tool pass that connector to get to the freewheel. I measured that connector at 18mm diameter.

I've seen people talk about splitting the freewheel tool, others talk about using method that destroys the old freewheel as seen on youtube. What I have in mind is making the hole in the freewheel tool bigger. That DNP freewheel tool linked above is supposed to have a 14mm hole. I should be able to take a small round grinding stone on a dremel tool and take it up to 18mm. It's going to be time consuming. But I think splitting a freewheel tool would be time consuming also.


Cassette removal tool I just remembered I had in the bottom of my bike tools
http://www.woollypigs.com/2011/10/meet-the-hypercracker/

I've used it on my older bikes, wondering how it would work on the RadRover & RadMini...

hypercracker2.jpg



From the article, it looks like there are a few other touring style freewheel lockring removal tools:

Found one on Amazon: Stein Mini Cassette Lockring driver 30+ bucks


Sang
 

windmill

Active Member
Cassette removal tool I just remembered I had in the bottom of my bike tools
http://www.woollypigs.com/2011/10/meet-the-hypercracker/

I've used it on my older bikes, wondering how it would work on the RadRover & RadMini...

View attachment 15849


From the article, it looks like there are a few other touring style freewheel lockring removal tools:

Found one on Amazon: Stein Mini Cassette Lockring driver 30+ bucks


Sang
Damn, I totally forgot about those types of tools. Just the ticket for those with the wire in the axle. Well done!
 

Lost

Active Member
Is it a cassette or a freewheel? I was under the impression it was a freewheel. Would the cassette tool be a help?
 

windmill

Active Member
Is it a cassette or a freewheel? I was under the impression it was a freewheel. Would the cassette tool be a help?
Shimano cassettes and freewheels use the same tool. It would be a matter of finding one of the older style tools that go deep enough to engage the splines of a freewheel. This type of tool has been used for a long time by touring cyclists.
 

thatdude902

Active Member
For future reference, when others start contemplating swapping out the freewheels on their Radrover, Radmini or other electric bikes with similar wiring. On the left is an old Shimano freewheel tool I got years ago with a 10mm opening (same as Park), and on the right is the DNP epoch tool with an ~18.5mm opening. So no drilling or grinding necessary to get around the wheel hub motor wire connector. Thanks for finding it.

2017-03-22 19.06.44.jpg

Edit: Oh shi.... still isn't going to work. Here's something I totally forgot to account for, the nut that's holding the wheel to the frame. That nut is also in the way like the connector. At the widest point, it's 20.5 mm so there is no way to pass through that freewheel tool. Maybe with some strategic grinding on the tool for 6 corners of the nut, and a little touchup on corners of the nut itself (about .5mm). Still might be possible.

Ok, I ended up splitting the tool. Wasn't too bad with a Dremel tool plus fiber reinforced-cutoff-wheel. At least the DNP tool is easier to split than the Park tool, thinner walls. I'll see how it goes this weekend when I take off the rear wheel from the bike.
 
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