Are there any "high end" ebikes with a 500 watt motor?

Frostybikes

New Member
Region
USA
I'm talking about brands like giant, trek, specialized, etc. An ebike with no throttle but just pedal assist.


It seems like they all have a motor of about 250 watts which is less than the motor on my radmission. That makes me think my radmission is more powerful than those (not sure though since those bikes have gears) while being way cheaper.


So are there any "name brand" ebikes with a motor comparable to my radmission?
 

soyabean

Active Member
Region
Canada
You actually have no idea what a motor's "watt" is, other than that they say it is.

It's usually not the motor. It's the controller that pumps the current into the motor.

I can take a 100w incadensant bulb and pump 150w into it and watch it glow pretty, but I wonder how long it will last.

That's why some bikes will advertise torque in the specs, this is more important.
 

Frostybikes

New Member
Region
USA
You actually have no idea what a motor's "watt" is, other than that they say it is.

It's usually not the motor. It's the controller that pumps the current into the motor.

I can take a 100w incadensant bulb and pump 150w into it and watch it glow pretty, but I wonder how long it will last.

That's why some bikes will advertise torque in the specs, this is more important.
Thanks.


My google search says the radmission has 50 nm of torque, while an ebike from trek (it didn't say which one) has 40 nm of torque.


How would the power on those bikes compare to my radmission (since those have gears while my bike doesn't)?
 

soyabean

Active Member
Region
Canada
The biggest enemy to a motor is heat, and more current means more heat.

You'll see a lot of mid drives at 250W which is plenty, and that motor will never overheat no matter what you put it thru.

Sure you can drive 500W thru that same motor, just like you can inject NOS has into your 4-cylinder...
 

Frostybikes

New Member
Region
USA
The biggest enemy to a motor is heat, and more current means more heat.

You'll see a lot of mid drives at 250W which is plenty, and that motor will never overheat no matter what you put it thru.

Sure you can drive 500W thru that same motor, just like you can inject NOS has into your 4-cylinder...
Thanks. As long as the bike feels the same, I wouldn't mind a 250 watt motor.

I just want the pedalling to be just as easy and fun as it is on my radmission. Plus the ease of going up hills.
 

soyabean

Active Member
Region
Canada
It seems like they all have a motor of about 250 watts
The point I'm trying to get across is that their motors are so optimized, they only need 250W of power to run them. This implies a lot of other important things, like lifespan longevity and battery consumption.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I'm talking about brands like giant, trek, specialized, etc. An ebike with no throttle but just pedal assist.


It seems like they all have a motor of about 250 watts which is less than the motor on my radmission. That makes me think my radmission is more powerful than those (not sure though since those bikes have gears) while being way cheaper.


So are there any "name brand" ebikes with a motor comparable to my radmission?
Most middrive motors are rated at 250 nomimal watts because that is the maximum legal power in Europe where most of their sales are.
For example, Specialized rates all the Como and Vado motors the same but the 5 motor series can put out 2 to 3 times the power of my 3 series ( 500 to 700 watts ) and maintain their high output for a long time while climbing mountains. Long enough to probably burn up your Rad's hub motor.
 

fooferdoggie

Well-Known Member
only the bottom of the line bosch has 40nm most have about 80 but the mid drive uses your drive train and that makes all the difference.
A rad would run home crying with this hill no problem on my bosch powered bike.
IMG_1242.jpeg
 

Stefan Mikes

Well-Known Member
Region
Europe
City
Brwinów (PL)
Thanks.


My google search says the radmission has 50 nm of torque, while an ebike from trek (it didn't say which one) has 40 nm of torque.


How would the power on those bikes compare to my radmission (since those have gears while my bike doesn't)?
Your Radmission has 50 Nm of torque while my Vado 5.0 (250 W nominal) has 90 Nm.
 

harryS

Well-Known Member
That hill would kill most hubmotors on throttle alone, but could be tackled in partnership with a 34T rear gear and a fit rider putting out 150W?
 

RGVCycling

Active Member
Region
USA
City
Mission
That hill would kill most hubmotors on throttle alone, but could be tackled in partnership with a 34T rear gear and a fit rider putting out 150W?
on my road bike, a hill like that was in the 300+ watts, thank goodness for granny gears!
 

Luto

Active Member
I ride a hill 60% length of that on my daily, but rutted dirt. First 1/3 is fine, Second 1/3 is slow but sure, Last 1/3 is when I am temped to use the motor, but tough it out at a 1:1 crank, wheel turn ratio. I try to keep it under 200 watts human power to keep the "sure" part intact.

Slow but sure is the way to go. Trying to go fast will always end you faster. It is still bike riding. For me it is the highlight of the ride.
 

Art Deco

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Selinsgrove Pennsylvania
I ride a hill 60% length of that on my daily, but rutted dirt. First 1/3 is fine, Second 1/3 is slow but sure, Last 1/3 is when I am temped to use the motor, but tough it out at a 1:1 crank, wheel turn ratio. I try to keep it under 200 watts human power to keep the "sure" part intact.

Slow but sure is the way to go. Trying to go fast will always end you faster. It is still bike riding. For me it is the highlight of the ride.
Getting to the top and still breathing would be the highlight of the ride for me.
 

PedalUma

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
Try to think of nominal watts as nominal power expenditure while just going along. A lower expenditure number can represent higher efficiency. A turkey expends more energy flying than a seagull. Another number to consider is peak power. This greatly influences the feel of a bike. I most enjoy bikes with a lower nominal watt usage that can seamlessly tap into peak power for a burst. Better mountain bikes are like this with smaller lighter motors that can be bursty for technical sections.