Are we doing it Wrong with High Rise stems or Adjustable

Cramer Long

Active Member
Region
USA
This is on a Vado 5 with the Headlight off the stem :

Reading all the threads and taking what I learned to purchase Stems . I bought a Stem Riser /Adjustable . Along with a Steering tube extension . It raised everything fine. I did however notice in order to get the handle bars closer . Which was my main goal in the first place . They ended up father away .

SO on the advice of buddies who do the MTB thing . I kept the extender , but used a 50MM 0 degree MTB Stem . First in looked badass. More importantly it brought my handle bars in considerably more then a 100 MM stem set at 60 Degrees . I also tried this Short flat stem with no steering tube riser and a Set of 50mm Riser Bars .

Yeah I know a Longer high angled stem does place you higher . To move your bars closer you'd have to adjust the Stem almost to 90 Degrees . Which would not only be way to high > It looks stupid LOL

Sadly My Vado has the Stem mounted light . I can't find a mount to use on the Fender . Which is really poor service on Specialized part . From pictures it looks like it would attach to any of their Fenders .

I'll likely settle for the 50MM Handle bars and call it good for now .
 

RunForTheHills

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
An adjustable stem can be useful for finding the right position, but I always replace it with a fixed position stem after I think I have it dialed in. I don't think high-rise stems are wrong, but too much stem can look kind of goofy. You can get the same amount of rise with a combination of handlebars with rise built in and a mid-rise stem. If you are not talking about drop handlebars, you can also get your hands closer to your body with swept back handlebars instead of flat bars.
 

TNC

Member
Region
USA
Cramer, since that's mainly a cruiser style bike, I think the ergonomics are the sole goal for how you set up the bar, stem, and other adjustments to fit you. As long as the components are of a level of quality that are within safety issues, you set it up the way that fits you. When one considers hardcore road bikes for speed and mountain bikes used aggressively, you sometimes have to compromise a little comfort for performance. And while looks might be an issue for some, that's something one personally has to weigh against comfort, enjoyment, and fit.
 

smorgasbord

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
There are a combination of factors at play:

• Since the steerer tube is at an angle towards the rider, as you raise the bars via extension tube they also move closer horizontally. This could be part of the reason why extension tubes are so popular.
• Longer angled stems, as you point out, move bars up and away.
• You do need to be careful about going to too short a stem, as that can make the steering twitchy and even dangerous.
• Risers will increase leverage on the steerer tube, which may be more dangerous, particularly if that tube is carbon fiber. In general I've found some adjustable stems to be rock solid while risers always seem a mixed bag, particularly if they're very long. YMMV.

The two successful handlebar raises I've done both involved replacing the handlebars themselves as well with versions that sweep back towards the rider - in one case a little bit (16 degrees), and a lot in the other case (Jones bar).

EDIT: changed first point to be accurate, as I had it exactly backwards.
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I used these on my latest build (comfortable street cruiser for 70 year old upright 6'2" rider). Works great, would do it the same way if needed to do it again.

Stem-

handlebars-
 

Cramer Long

Active Member
Region
USA
Cramer, since that's mainly a cruiser style bike, I think the ergonomics are the sole goal for how you set up the bar, stem, and other adjustments to fit you. As long as the components are of a level of quality that are within safety issues, you set it up the way that fits you. When one considers hardcore road bikes for speed and mountain bikes used aggressively, you sometimes have to compromise a little comfort for performance. And while looks might be an issue for some, that's something one personally has to weigh against comfort, enjoyment, and fit.
I agree. After posting this I road it that way . Almost to responsive for turns