Atlas first impressions

username00101

Member
Region
USA
So far 45 miles on the Atlas.

The only range test I did so far is on 2 major 15% hills, many other 5%+ hills, mostly on PA5. I got home with about 15% battery remaining after 20 miles.


I find the bike pretty big, especially with a suspension seatpost - and I'm 5'10. I definitely need to lean the bike to one side, and time it right to get into position so as soon as I hit the peddle, the motor helps move me.

What I really like is how responsive the motor is from a standstill. As soon as it hit the peddle, off the motor goes and it makes the process very easy.
 
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KnobbyGuy

New Member
Region
USA
FIRST POST! [Owner of Aurora LE since Feb 2021 that was ordered Nov 2020].
Just received my new Atlas on Aug 9th and feel it's going to work well for me. Really like the Bafang drive and display/controller since it has more features and settings than the current Dapu display (had the Bafang setup on a Biktrix model and really missed the PAS selection of 3,5, or 9 levels). Added the 'optional' throttle but locating and accessing the harness connector was a serious challenge! Power and delivery is quite similar to the Aurora but the bigger wheels and higher top speed are killer! The manually controlled Enviolo hub dictates that the rider has more involvement in the cycling process, but it’s second nature to anyone with derailleur experience. I was surprised that the hub does not like to change ratios while pedaling under load but easily shifts with a slight ‘let up’ of pedal pressure. The Atlas feels lighter than the Aurora LE but my bathroom scales indicate a similar weight at 64 lbs. Battery weight is 8.4 lbs (vs 7.6 for the Aurora) and looks to provide an impressive range. I put 40 miles on the first full charge and the battery was still showing over 40% (on flat paved Rails to Trails). Motor noise could be described as a light whine (think of a tiny turbine engine). Not annoying but certainly obvious to those riding close by. The supplied seat is not comfy, same as the Aurora, so I changed it out immediately. A rear cargo rack is not included (bummer) so I’m currently installing a ‘universal fit’ model that is $120 cheaper than the custom Evelo unit. (although I’ll need a 12 dollar, 2 pin Julet ‘extension’ cord for the rear tail light). Not crazy about losing my name brand Tektro hydraulic brakes but I guess the supply chain problem necessitated a switch to the ‘no name’ Zoom brakes with pressed steel levers (another bummer).
 

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keithj69

Member
Region
USA
FIRST POST! [Owner of Aurora LE since Feb 2021 that was ordered Nov 2020].
Just received my new Atlas on Aug 9th and feel it's going to work well for me. Really like the Bafang drive and display/controller since it has more features and settings than the current Dapu display (had the Bafang setup on a Biktrix model and really missed the PAS selection of 3,5, or 9 levels). Added the 'optional' throttle but locating and accessing the harness connector was a serious challenge! Power and delivery is quite similar to the Aurora but the bigger wheels and higher top speed are killer! The manually controlled Enviolo hub dictates that the rider has more involvement in the cycling process, but it’s second nature to anyone with derailleur experience. I was surprised that the hub does not like to change ratios while pedaling under load but easily shifts with a slight ‘let up’ of pedal pressure. The Atlas feels lighter than the Aurora LE but my bathroom scales indicate a similar weight at 64 lbs. Battery weight is 8.4 lbs (vs 7.6 for the Aurora) and looks to provide an impressive range. I put 40 miles on the first full charge and the battery was still showing over 40% (on flat paved Rails to Trails). Motor noise could be described as a light whine (think of a tiny turbine engine). Not annoying but certainly obvious to those riding close by. The supplied seat is not comfy, same as the Aurora, so I changed it out immediately. A rear cargo rack is not included (bummer) so I’m currently installing a ‘universal fit’ model that is $120 cheaper than the custom Evelo unit. (although I’ll need a 12 dollar, 2 pin Julet ‘extension’ cord for the rear tail light). Not crazy about losing my name brand Tektro hydraulic brakes but I guess the supply chain problem necessitated a switch to the ‘no name’ Zoom brakes with pressed steel levers (another bummer).
Thank you for your review. If you ever do a range test, please report and with your battery setup. I am eyeing the atlas vs Aurora and any real world reports is much welcomed.
 

KnobbyGuy

New Member
Region
USA
Sure, really looking forward to testing out the range, which I think will be stellar. I was out of town last week so didn't get a chance to run it. I had the Aurora for 1.5 yrs and 1,500 miles and it would go about 30 miles and show about 1 bar left (although the display would usually indicate less juice than the indicator on the battery itself). The step-thru frame of the Aurora is certainly a factor if you have trouble getting a leg over a 'boys' bike. I think the Aurora is probably a better value for the money since you're getting the Automatiq Enviolo hub, the rear rack, and throttle. I really liked my Aurora with the Harmony control because you could switch from manual to automatic with a simple button press (but Evelo doesn't offer that system anymore). Both these models have a solid, stable feel and handle well. I like the wider tires for the rare times we're on gravel, sand, or unpaved surfaces.
 

username00101

Member
Region
USA
the atlas is designed to be used with the dual battery, not the rear rack w/o the battery. Sure one can just use a back rack, but that defeats the purpose of having the integrated dual battery hookup in the frame.

There's an electronic port cable already pre-installed right into the frame for the 2nd battery + rack.

Once one battery runs out of juice, it automatically just shifts to the other one.

The dual battery ships next month, I was informed.
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
I'm at 45 miles on my 10 day old Atlas as well. Results so far are good, but I would prefer to go a bit longer prior to saying a lot about it.

Regarding the M600 motor noise, that's pretty subjective, but I'll go out on a limb and say there's nothing objectionable about it. Yes, there's a "whir" to it, but nothing that should be considered a deal breaker. They've done something different as compared to the earlier M600's that ran with a pretty significant noise level, but I have no idea what.

I did note it does not have the brute power to accelerate hard in the higher ranges of the CVT like the M610/Ultra does. If you're faced with crossing a busy road for instance, you need to be conscious of what to expect according to what part of the CVT range is currently selected. Also, regarding the CVT, it takes a pretty healthy grip to twist that shifter (something I notice anyway). In that regard, one of the reasons my bike doesn't have more miles on it is because I thought the force to turn the shifter might be excessive. I did some close checking, which led to re-routing the shift cables - and that did involve pulling the motor. That led to the existing length of the cables being long, so those needed to be cut and redone. THAT operation not for the faint of heart, but I do feel there was a slight reduction in the required effort to shift. Enough to go through what I did? Maybe not....

Support, including the answer to the "where does the throttle plug in" question, has been pretty incredible since my earliest inquiries months ago. Generally no more than an hour for a response, and that's not some auto generated note saying they received your question. That 1 hour (or less) response will contain experienced answers/guidance. This support is on a whole new level, way above anything I've ever experienced before - on any product. I really hope they can maintain this into the future. On a 1-10 level, I would rate it as a very solid 10. If they can maintain it, I'll go ahead and predict this company is going to be a game changer on the consumer direct scene....
 

username00101

Member
Region
USA
Also, regarding the CVT, it takes a pretty healthy grip to twist that shifter (something I notice anyway).

I'm not sure about a healthy grip as much as it just tends to not twist under circumstances. Definitely do not force it whatever one does.

I'd definitely not want to have to take the motor off and cut the cables on something like the Atlas. Sounds like you're pretty darn experienced with an e-bike!

Once one figures out the twisting, this is a solid bike from my very limited experience.
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Also, regarding the CVT, it takes a pretty healthy grip to twist that shifter (something I notice anyway).

I'm not sure about a healthy grip as much as it just tends to not twist under circumstances. Definitely do not force it whatever one does.

I'd definitely not want to have to take the motor off and cut the cables on something like the Atlas. Sounds like you're pretty darn experienced with an e-bike!

Once one figures out the twisting, this is a solid bike from my very limited experience.
Yes, experienced, but more, willing to ask questions and learn as required. Lucky that way, as it comes easily. Evelo says "substantial effort" should be expected. That said, the difficulty to turn the shifter is still in focus. Not going to be happy until I've done everything I can think of to make it easier. Will report back with anything I find. Kinda why I'm holding off on my ride impressions. -Al
 

KnobbyGuy

New Member
Region
USA
Normal shifting on my Atlas requires a firm twist but nothing that I perceive as abnormal. But, under load it certainly does not want to twist. And yes, you are best to gear down at any stop if you anticipate a quick getaway. In the lower gear ratios, acceleration is pretty good when using the throttle. Something I kinda miss from the Aurora in the automatic mode because it would automatically gear down at stops and lower speeds in order to quickly get you back up to your desired cadence!

However, I just noticed that I cannot shift completely from HI to LO (or vis-versa) at a dead stop! I need to rotate the crank slightly to get the full range. Can anyone else confirm this on their Atlas?
 
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username00101

Member
Region
USA
If you're at a dead stop, and shift to the upper hill thing, and hit the peddle the bike takes right off. The responsiveness to the peddle assist is in my opinion the best part of the bike and it works incredibly well.

I've been on a 20% steep slope non-paved surface at a dead stop, shift up to the maximum hill climb, and hit the peddle and off I go.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Normal shifting on my Atlas requires a firm twist but nothing that I perceive as abnormal. But, under load it certainly does not want to twist. And yes, you are best to gear down at any stop if you anticipate a quick getaway. In the lower gear ratios, acceleration is pretty good when using the throttle. Something I kinda miss from the Aurora in the automatic mode because it would automatically gear down at stops and lower speeds in order to quickly get you back up to your desired cadence!

However, I just noticed that I cannot shift completely from HI to LO (or vis-versa) at a dead stop! I need to rotate the crank slightly to get the full range. Can anyone else confirm this on their Atlas?
I can confirm that mine is doing something similar on the bench. I cannot fully shift from one extreme ratio to the other. It's like the last 10% is blocked off until the rear tire (or crank?) gets a spin. Underway, it doesn't seem to be an issue. That's something I learned the hard way when setting up the new cable lengths..... So typical of me to learn stuff the "hard way". But those lessons are generally the permanent ones not forgotten!

I don't notice the difference in shifting effort under a load vs. not under a load, but that could be I'm so used to backing off on the pedal pressure while shifting - 50 years of derailleur equipped bike experience 😁

I'd also confirm it will climb like a homesick angel when set for full "up hill". It's NOT hurting for hill climbing power....
 

KnobbyGuy

New Member
Region
USA
In that regard, one of the reasons my bike doesn't have more miles on it is because I thought the force to turn the shifter might be excessive. I did some close checking, which led to re-routing the shift cables - and that did involve pulling the motor. That led to the existing length of the cables being long, so those needed to be cut and redone. THAT operation not for the faint of heart, but I do feel there was a slight reduction in the required effort to shift. Enough to go through what I did? Maybe not....
AHicks
Just wondering if you were able to confirm that you are getting the full gear range after adjustment? I just took a 14 mile test ride along side my wife and her Aurora LE (Automatiq) and at 20 mph, her cadence was significantly slower than my Atlas at it's highest ratio. I figured the Aurora and Atlas hubs had the same internal ratios, but maybe not??? I would imagine that just because the twist grip indicator is showing 'high gear' that the hub may not actually be actuated to it's extreme limit?
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Not feeling qualified to comment on Aurora vs. Atlas cadence, or automatic vs. manual. About the only thing I can share is that the part the cables engage in the back moves through about 180 degrees of travel. High gear (lowest cadence/hill is flat lined) is full counter clockwise if I remember right.
 

username00101

Member
Region
USA
I've often found that I think I'm in the highest gear, but actually when I twist shift up, there's one more higher gear that's not obvious on the biker with the hill diagram.
 

KnobbyGuy

New Member
Region
USA
I've often found that I think I'm in the highest gear, but actually when I twist shift up, there's one more higher gear that's not obvious on the biker with the hill diagram.
Yes, I've noticed the same thing. It's pretty subtle but worth giving it that extra twist. It is somewhat annoying that you can't get that thing to shift from LO to HI with a single twist. Not sure if that action will improve during break-in!
 

username00101

Member
Region
USA
The twist shifter is actually a pretty simple device on the atlas, it's not electronic or anything - just a typical cable shifter with a pretty diagram.

I feel very confident that if someone was familiar with shifters on e-bikes that it'd be possible to swap it out for a different shifter. Or any E bike shop could figure that out.
 

AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
Not crazy about the shifter here either. My only thought is that the new shifter is going to need to deal with quite a bit of cable travel, without being too much travel, to the point it overwhelms the shift mechanism in back.

Project will require a lot of messing around with different shifters I think.

Following with interest!

Edit: thinking about it, most shifters use just one cable. You'd have to set up some sort of spring return, increasing the pull required in one direction or the other. Not saying it can't be done, only that it's going to take some creativity... -Al
 
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username00101

Member
Region
USA
If its between an automatic shifter that relies on an app, and is computer controlled. Or a manual shifter thats easy to replace with cables, I'll go with the manual one every time.

I like the fact that its a physical adjust, and not an electronic adjust. Why? Less can go wrong, and I'm more in control.
 
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AHicks

Well-Known Member
Region
USA
City
Snow Bird - Summer S.E. Michigan, Winter Gulf Coast North Central Fl.
If its between an automatic shifter that relies on an app, and is computer controlled. Or a manual shifter thats easy to replace with cables, I'll go with the manual one every time.

I like the fact that its a physical adjust, and not an electronic adjust. Why? Less can go wrong, and I'm more in control.
I'll add another reason for going with the manual, maintaining my ability to repair it! Not so sure the auto contains "user serviceable parts" inside.

I'm fine with the manual shift, just curious/interested in how to allow "easy as possible" shifting. I have the time and the patience to see how well I can make it....